A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime,

A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime,


A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony [PDF / Epub] ☉ A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony Author Hector Garcia Puigcerver – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk For every fan of manga, anime, J pop, or Zen, A Geek in Japan is a hip, smart and concise guide to the land that is their sourceComprehensive and well informed, it covers a wide array of topics in sho For every fan of manga, anime, J pop, in Japan: PDF/EPUB Ã or Zen, A Geek in Japan is a hip, smart and concise guide to the land that is their sourceComprehensive and well informed, it covers a wide array of topics in short articles accompanied by sidebars and numerous A Geek Kindle - photographs, providing a lively digest of the society and culture of Japan Designed to appeal to the generations of Westerners who grew up on Pokemon, manga and video games, A Geek in Japan reinvents the culture guide for readers in the Internet ageSpotlighting the originality and creativity Geek in Japan: ePUB ☆ of the Japanese, debunking myths about them, and answering nagging questions like why they re so fond of robots, author Hector Garcia has created the perfect book for the growing ranks of Japanophiles in this inspired, insightful and highly informative guide.

  • Paperback
  • 160 pages
  • A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony
  • Hector Garcia Puigcerver
  • English
  • 03 January 2019
  • 4805311290

About the Author: Hector Garcia Puigcerver

I m the author of several Japanese culture in Japan: PDF/EPUB Ã books Ikigai the Japanese Secret for a Long and Happy Life, The Book of Ichigo Ichie, Shinrinyoku, The Ikigai Journey and A Geek in JapanI LOVE reading and writingAutor de los libros sobre cultura japonesa Ikigai, Ichigo Ichie, A Geek Kindle - Shinrinyoku, Un Geek en Jap ntpauthor hectorgarcia.



10 thoughts on “A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony

  1. Sara Sara says:

    This would probably have beenhelpful if I was actually going to Japan I m not anytime soon soyeah Some of the passages were very repetitive I got a weird sense of deja vu about 20 times throughout reading this because some sentences were repeatedthan once It provided a very broad, very brief overview to the complete history and culture of Japan Pretty much everything you can think of is covered, even including brief tourist guides and recommended walks However, I felt at This would probably have beenhelpful if I was actually going to Japan I m not anytime soon soyeah Some of the passages were very repetitive I got a weird sense of deja vu about 20 times throughout reading this because some sentences were repeatedthan once It provided a very broad, very brief overview to the complete history and culture of Japan Pretty much everything you can think of is covered, even including brief tourist guides and recommended walks However, I felt at times it was stereotyping a whole race of people All Japanese are polite and avoid confrontation Well, I beg to differ That s like saying all British people are polite and drink tea I m not either of these things The last chapter with common phrases would be helpful for Japanese tourists I guess I was expecting something other than a glorified travel guide

  2. Nadia King Nadia King says:

    Comprehensive, brilliant book about Japan her culture, her history, her geography, and her people Love this book which I can t seem to shift from my coffee table to the bookshelves because I love it so much.

  3. Yue Yue says:

    Like a geek, I spent my whole weekend reading this wonderful book And I feel like I have been in Japan over the weekend, walking around Tokyo, the stores, the gardens.People who are interested in Japan must read this book I learnt so much It has subjects about everything Japanese customs, a bit of history, places that we must visit manga and anime and so many others There are things that I ve already known because of manga, doramas like stuffs about their school system, food, etc Other t Like a geek, I spent my whole weekend reading this wonderful book And I feel like I have been in Japan over the weekend, walking around Tokyo, the stores, the gardens.People who are interested in Japan must read this book I learnt so much It has subjects about everything Japanese customs, a bit of history, places that we must visit manga and anime and so many others There are things that I ve already known because of manga, doramas like stuffs about their school system, food, etc Other things I am learning just by watching this TV show Cartoon KAT TUN, which is like, the funniest and most entertaining show evah For example, the way they greet people, or why girls cover their mouth when they laugh Or the importance they give to their food Or how polite and respectful they are, and their nice sense of humor.Some things I may have taken for granted, or when I was reading, I was like Oh I noticed that too but never asked myself why are that Japanese people do not use the word iie, no Or that they use the word chotto a lot.A huge positive aspect in this book is that the author shares his own anecdotes with the reader Stories that involve the environment in his work, with his co workers or when he was trying to rent a room in a hotel, or the places he likes the best Stories that make the reader understandand better And most of the photos are from the author himself, not from Internet.Luckily this journey does not end here The author bless his soul has his own blog where he describes and tells usabout this amazing country, Look like GR is not going to be the only website I visit the most

  4. Daniel Doughty Daniel Doughty says:

    A series of short snippets and mundane anecdotes about Japan Informative if you know little about Japan, yet often repetitive A non essential component to visiting the country.

  5. Marrynka Marrynka says:

    Perfect book to read before traveling to Japan After reading it I feel fully prepared for my trip Book includes a lot of general information written in engaging and concise way which makes it a page turner Book includes chapters about history, traditional arts, Japanese culture and mindset, food, music, anime and manga and waybasically everything there is to know about this fascinating country Last two chapters are aimed specifically at tourist planning their trip, they are packed Perfect book to read before traveling to Japan After reading it I feel fully prepared for my trip Book includes a lot of general information written in engaging and concise way which makes it a page turner Book includes chapters about history, traditional arts, Japanese culture and mindset, food, music, anime and manga and waybasically everything there is to know about this fascinating country Last two chapters are aimed specifically at tourist planning their trip, they are packed with places to visit as well as practical advice

  6. Darjeeling Darjeeling says:

    p26 During the Edo Period, when Japan received almost no influence from foreign cultures, a number of unique arts or disciplines were developed For instance, kabuki theater appeared as a consequence of the need to entertain an increasingly flourishing society withandfree time So much for diversity being a strengthp144 is the start of a chapter on Odaiba, one of Japans many small islands In the top left corner there is a picture of the Statue Of Liberty This confused me at fi p26 During the Edo Period, when Japan received almost no influence from foreign cultures, a number of unique arts or disciplines were developed For instance, kabuki theater appeared as a consequence of the need to entertain an increasingly flourishing society withandfree time So much for diversity being a strengthp144 is the start of a chapter on Odaiba, one of Japans many small islands In the top left corner there is a picture of the Statue Of Liberty This confused me at first Turns out Japan just decided they wanted one too They also have a copy of the Eiffel Tower Talk about cultural appropriation PI found the chapter on Japanese business the most interesting, probably because it was the topic I knew the least about I also learned allot about Confucianism for similar reasons, it s one of the few eastern philosophies I haven t studied yet, and I will add a few books on the topic to my reading list It sounds fascinating, sort of like Plato s Republic which I have managed to read allot about without having actually read That s on my list too except that it actually works It s a heavily collectivist ideology, and not something I would want to live in In fact I would probably feel the need to rebel against it, just as I feel the need to rebel against collectivism in my own culture, and we can see some of the disadvantages to collectivism, as well as the advantages, in Japanese culture, which I have always had a great deal of respect for and still do I m envious of Japans low crime rate, and almost non existent terrorism Japan has a very strict immigration policy , but I also don t want to be forced into a system of mass conformity, where argument from authority is not considered a logical fallacy Sometimes you can t have your cake and eat it I do think there are some aspects of Japanese culture we can and should culturally appropriate, just as they have culturally appropriated many of the best aspects of western culture and integrated them.Peace

  7. Tanya Tosheva Tanya Tosheva says:

    This will not be so much a review of the book as my attempt to remember a gazillion facts and new Japanese words, which overwhelmed me despite already knowing some from anime and manga and being used to the sound of the language.Almost everything below is a quote.History of Japan view spoiler Legend tells that Japan was born of the love between two deities, Izanagi and Izanami These two deities had a daughter, Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her T This will not be so much a review of the book as my attempt to remember a gazillion facts and new Japanese words, which overwhelmed me despite already knowing some from anime and manga and being used to the sound of the language.Almost everything below is a quote.History of Japan view spoiler Legend tells that Japan was born of the love between two deities, Izanagi and Izanami These two deities had a daughter, Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her The first settlers whose archeological remains have been found belong to the Jomon Period,than 8,000 years ago But not until the eighth century CE is there a real Japanese state, with its first capital being Nara Between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, Japan was run as a system of flefs, or local powers subordinate to the shogun, that were always flghting one another Everything changed in the year 1600, when one of the most important events in the history of Japan took place, the battle of Sekigahara The Hideyoshi clan s defeat in this battle meant a new family became paramount, the Tokugawas, who would rule Japan until 1868 The first Tokugawa was Ieyasu, who decided to govern from his castle in Edo, present day Tokyo The period under Tokugawa rule would become known as the Edo Period 1603 1868 In July 1853, an American squadron of warships led by Commodore Matthew Perry entered Tokyo Bay Unsure what to do in the face of American cannons, the shogun, for the first time in six centuries of military power, consulted the emperor about a course of action Without hesitation, the emperor replied that they must drive the Americans away Unfortunately, the shogun didn t have the military might to expel the Americans, and he was forced to sign the agreement After disobeying the emperor, considered a living god by all the Japanese, the last of the Tokugawa shoguns lost the people s trust He had to resign, allowing the triumphal restoration of power to the imperial house hide spoiler Language of Japan view spoiler The Japanese began to develop their own writing system around the flfth century CE, based on Chinese characters called han They used the Chinese symbols to represent their own spoken language graphically, though the Chinese and Japanese grammars have nothing in common.Kanji symbols with from one to several meanings, one to several pronunciations, and can be combined to form new words This last point, while seemingly trivial, gives the greatest headaches to those studying this language and to the Japanese themselves, who must devotethan ten years to learning how to write them There arethan 40,000 kanji, but the Japanese are required to know a list of only 2,136 official kanji, known as the Joyo Kanji.Joyo Kanji A list of only 2,136 official kanji Books and newspapers using kanji that are not on this list must write their transcription in the hiragana syllabic alphabet.Katakana The katakana syllabary is used to write words of foreign origin that have been introduced into Japanese.Hiragana The 46 symbols in the hiragana syllabary represent the 46 possible consonant and vowel combinations in spoken Japanese.Romaji The transcription in Roman alphabet of how a word sounds For example, the word house is pronounced ie in Japanese, and therefore house written in romaji would be ie.A Japanese person reading romaji and this may strike us as amazing will find it difficult to understand what it says Japanese minds are designed to understand symbols and not letters.The Japanese Constitution, created under American supervision after the war, has a version written in romaji because the Americans didn t trust Japanese symbols and wanted a version that they could at least read, even if they couldn t understand it hide spoiler Do view spoiler Do originated in China five or six centuries before Christ It was Laozi or Lao Tzu who developed tao or dao In Japan it s not merely a character but a whole philosophical concept and a way of life that has been deeply rooted in Japanese thinking for centuries The Japanese seek perfection in some tasks kata as a means to acquire spiritual satisfaction in their lives.Basically, the apprenticeship system in any discipline following the Tao Zen philosophy consists of three steps 1 Establishing a series of patterns, models, or forms known as kata.2 Repeating the kata for many years.3 Perfecting and searching for beauty in the kata, joining them in a sort of enlightenment hide spoiler Interesting concepts words view spoiler honne the wishes, opinions, and true feelings every individual has tatemae social obligations and opinions that the individual has adapted to society s.From the Western point of view, concealing the truth may be looked on with disfavor In Japan, however, preserving harmony isimportant, and that s why true thoughts honne are not usually expressed in a straightforward way, for fear of hurting people s feelings We could say tatemae serves as a lubricant in human relationships It is also used in business, where established conventions have to be followed giri the obligation to care about those who have given you something in life so that you are indebted to them.The origin of giri is ancient, but it became widespread through the influence of the samurai class in the feudal era, who would feel giri toward the lord protecting their families Giri forces us to return favors, to preserve harmony in human and social relationships so that some measure of peace is maintained in society There is an extensive tradition of giving presents on special occasions and, if you receive a gift, you must always give something of the same value in return This might seem a matter of common sense in any other culture, but in Japan the amount of gift giving can be extravagant In Japan, gifts are very important within the system, and there is a series of unwritten rules that, when broken, can cause social unease The basic rule is that a gift must be nonor less valuable than the relationship between the two people.omiai arranged marriagesIn the past, it was quite common, and all decisions regarding the marriage were made by the parents on both sides Today, omiai marriages still happen, but there isfreedom Parents simply organize an appointment for their son and daughter and if it works, good, but if they don t suit each other, nothing happens There s usually not much pressure Nevertheless, one out of every ten marriages today is of the omiai kind.sumimasen Of course, it means I m sorry but in Japan it s also used to relax the tension in a conversation it s like a sign that says you understand the other person s feelings.chotto can be translated literally as a little, a minute, a moment Chotto matte kudasai Wait a minute, please However, it s used in a variety of situations to avoid expressing an unpleasant denial.amae used to describe the way we act when we wish to be loved or seek attention, when we want to depend on someone else with a certain sense of submissiveness.A universal example of amae in practice is the boy who carries the girl s books in college She could easily carry them herself, but she likes to be taken care of and the man likes to feel he s taking care of somebody Another manifestation of amae would be when you act capriciously so that your protector will let you get away with something A boy pretends to be tired so that his mother will yield and allow him to go to bed without putting his clothes in the washing machine.uchi people in your family and circle of friendssoto other peopleAt the first uchi level we find our family unit, followed by families connected to us Then, we have friends, followed by our company, and last, we have our country Thus, foreigners in Japan are about as soto as you can get that s why they say that, no matter how long you live there, you will always be treated as a gaijin The Japanese will treat you as soto simply because they unconsciously believe you are some sort of threat to their uchi harmony, and that is one of the reasons Japan is such a closed country But don t misunderstand me being treated as soto doesn t mean they treat you badly They will probably beattentive to you than your Western friends The problem is, you feel as though there is some sort of barrier This also comes through in the use of both verbal and nonverbal cues, which clearly denote whether you re entering their uchi or not.Keiretsu groups of companies that work together, trying not to compete with one another and cooperating in order to makemoney together.Kaizen literally means a change for the better and is used in Japanese business culture to express the need to improve constantly, to do things the best you can, using the fewest resources and creating the highest value.Meishi business cards, but in Japan they are an extremely important element when starting a conversation with a stranger, a client, or another company Because the meishi is so significant, you must treat it with the utmost care, as if it were part of the other person.Nemawashi an essential concept for understanding the Japanese business world It s usually translated as prior consultation To some extent, you could see nemawashi as a sort of democracy taken to the extreme Thanks to this, Japanese companies seldom make mistakes and are always taking steps forward and improving ceaselessly, if slowly.Suppose you have the brilliant idea of eliminating a redundant chip from one of the company products Before making your proposal, you must make sure that all the employees around you agree This consultation yields numerous advantages if all agree with your proposal, you have an almost one hundred percent chance it will be accepted, and if people don t accept your proposal, you can improve it so as to include everybody else s suggestions Also, if your idea is bad one, you won t make a fool of yourself, since you haven t made a formal proposal.The Sony employee will consult all his department coworkers, and, once he has made sure his proposal is accepted by everyone, he will talk with his kakaricho immediate superior His superior will then do a nemawashi among the other department heads, and once they have agreed, the process will continue until the idea reaches the highest spheres at Sony Notice how, if the nemawashi process fails somewhere along the line because someone is totally against it, the idea never flows toward the top of the pyramid.Once the nemawashi process has been completed, the department that initiated it can make a formal proposal in a meeting, where it will obviously be accepted.The Japanese avoid direct confrontation above all Employees simply go to work every day, don t complain, arrive punctually, and never leave on time they always have to work overtime.Making changes in Japan is difficult Everything is slow, there is a lot of paperwork, everybody must agree, and there are tons of meetings But when things are done, they usually work to perfection everything goes well.humility essential value for comporting oneself correctly in Japan.Let s suppose we re giving our boss some cookies At the moment we do, we must say, Sumimasen, tsumaranai mono desu ga This may be translated as, Pardon me for giving you such a petty thing In using this expression, we are praising our boss by making him understand that he really deserves a much better present The same expression would be used the other way around, if our boss gave us a present No matter what one s status, everybody in Japan must be humble to respect their way of being Sometimes it happens that someone is too ambitious and flaunts his power too much, and he ends up being ostracized by his company and society There are books about cases where a person of great promise has ended up cleaning the company bathrooms because he was too ambitious and his superiors got scared the Japanese see ambition as a threat to the inner balance of the system, which might bring them down in the future.sake means alcoholic drink in general Thus, if you drink a beer, you are drinking sake if you drink whiskey, you are drinking sake and if you drink rum, you are drinking sake.nihonshu the alcoholic beverage obtained from rice.hanami an excursion to see flowers, a centuries old tradition in Japan.Today the hanami tradition involves sitting under a sakura tree with your family, your friends, or the people at your company The main problem is the lack of room Ueno and Yoyogi Parks are jam packed, and that s why someone from the company usually goes early to scout out a place and save some room under a tree There are apparently people who will even sleep under a tree that s expected to flower the next day so they ll be able to enjoy it with their colleagues from work.The manji an ancient Buddhist symbol full of spiritual meaning Resembles a swastikas, which shocks many tourists.matsuri festivals celebrating religious mostly Shinto traditions throughout the year.ema wooden plaques with wishes written on them for the god to make come true.Jinja Shinto shrines The easiest way to identify a jinja is to look at the entrance You will almost always find a large red wooden gate marking the entrance to sacred ground In contrast, at the entrance to a Buddhist o tera, there is usually a smaller dark colored gate and walls separating the temple grounds from the outside.Ukiyo e print making art was developed during the Edo Period 1603 1868 Thanks to the ease with which ukiyo e copies could be made, they arrived in the West and influenced painters of the time, such as Vincent Van Gogh and Claude Monet.shunga mass produced ukiyo e prints of scenes of explicit sex May constitute one of the earliest pornographic markets in history onsen geisha prostitute geisha, different from those considered genuine artist geisha.chado the way of tea matcha one of Japan s most appreciated varieties of green tea and is the variety used in the tea ceremony.The main difference between matcha and other types of green tea is that, during the last weeks before harvest, the tea plants are covered so they don t get any sunlight Moreover, only the best shoots are hand picked for the matcha production, and unlike in other teas, they are ground to an extremely flne powder It is very rich in amino acids and antioxidants.Zen koan brief stories in the form of riddles or fables that Zen teachers use to teach lessons to their students According to Zen doctrine, the nature of Zen can t be taught with words, and therefore it is the student who must teach himself.Blood groups In Japan, people ask what your blood group is in the most unexpected situations Sometimes when you meet someone, they ask what your blood group is before asking you how old you are Many people believe in a host of superstitions and pseudoscientific theories that associate blood types with character.LaughterCovering your teeth with your hand is seen as a sign of good manners in Japanese women Shamelessly showing the inside of your mouth when you laugh can be seen as a sign of bad manners hide spoiler There s so muchbut I ll leave it at that For future someday visits to Tokyo I just have to remember to visit the Akihabara district

  8. Sam Still Reading Sam Still Reading says:

    A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have I love Japan and I love to learnabout it A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains muchinformation than you think at first glance Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan It includes history, social structures I learnedfrom this book than I did from six years of Japanese , cult A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have I love Japan and I love to learnabout it A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains muchinformation than you think at first glance Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan It includes history, social structures I learnedfrom this book than I did from six years of Japanese , culture, work life, leisure, anime, cosplay, vending machines, zen, Shinto, Buddhism, temples, shrines and walking tours of various places in Tokyo.What I found very interesting was that according to Hector, the Japanese wish for harmony as a whole over triumph of the individual which is very different to what occurs in the West It was also interesting to see repetition given as a way of learning if you do something hundreds of times, you will end up getting it right The work structures were also very interesting the consultation between many levels with the focus on precision If I wasn t a gaijin, I think I d like this Hector explains things very clearly in the majority of circumstances but occasionally the English sounded a little off to me for example, a lot of use of the word over This is a small thing to get used to.I learnt so much from this book,than I did over a long period of study and a long trip to Japan It clarified a lot of things for me Well done on a great book this would certainly be of use to those going to Japan or just wanting to knowabout it The pictures are excellent too

  9. Jason Keenan Jason Keenan says:

    A Geek in Japan Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony is such a great introduction to Japanese culture and the modern cool Japan we are coming to know as well as the historic Japan.The book is a fun read and may even surprise readers familiar with Japan with a few new explanations of culture and history.Don t let the title fool you A Geek in Japan really offers up a whole lot of quick highlights of what makes up life in Japan It touches on broad topics like tradi A Geek in Japan Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony is such a great introduction to Japanese culture and the modern cool Japan we are coming to know as well as the historic Japan.The book is a fun read and may even surprise readers familiar with Japan with a few new explanations of culture and history.Don t let the title fool you A Geek in Japan really offers up a whole lot of quick highlights of what makes up life in Japan It touches on broad topics like traditional culture, the Japanese character, and daily life All in all it s a wonderful introduction to what makes Japan unique.The book also has a wonderful informal tone which can help anyone planning a trip to map out their plans in a fun way

  10. Annice22 Annice22 says:

    This was very boring.However, I did enjoy seeing all the pictures that were throughout the book but I felt like I would have been better off just searching online and reading general information instead of reading this Because most of this just feels like internet research instead of feeling like a first hand account from someone who was living there.

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10 thoughts on “A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony

  1. Sara Sara says:

    This would probably have beenhelpful if I was actually going to Japan I m not anytime soon soyeah Some of the passages were very repetitive I got a weird sense of deja vu about 20 times throughout reading this because some sentences were repeatedthan once It provided a very broad, very brief overview to the complete history and culture of Japan Pretty much everything you can think of is covered, even including brief tourist guides and recommended walks However, I felt at This would probably have beenhelpful if I was actually going to Japan I m not anytime soon soyeah Some of the passages were very repetitive I got a weird sense of deja vu about 20 times throughout reading this because some sentences were repeatedthan once It provided a very broad, very brief overview to the complete history and culture of Japan Pretty much everything you can think of is covered, even including brief tourist guides and recommended walks However, I felt at times it was stereotyping a whole race of people All Japanese are polite and avoid confrontation Well, I beg to differ That s like saying all British people are polite and drink tea I m not either of these things The last chapter with common phrases would be helpful for Japanese tourists I guess I was expecting something other than a glorified travel guide

  2. Nadia King Nadia King says:

    Comprehensive, brilliant book about Japan her culture, her history, her geography, and her people Love this book which I can t seem to shift from my coffee table to the bookshelves because I love it so much.

  3. Yue Yue says:

    Like a geek, I spent my whole weekend reading this wonderful book And I feel like I have been in Japan over the weekend, walking around Tokyo, the stores, the gardens.People who are interested in Japan must read this book I learnt so much It has subjects about everything Japanese customs, a bit of history, places that we must visit manga and anime and so many others There are things that I ve already known because of manga, doramas like stuffs about their school system, food, etc Other t Like a geek, I spent my whole weekend reading this wonderful book And I feel like I have been in Japan over the weekend, walking around Tokyo, the stores, the gardens.People who are interested in Japan must read this book I learnt so much It has subjects about everything Japanese customs, a bit of history, places that we must visit manga and anime and so many others There are things that I ve already known because of manga, doramas like stuffs about their school system, food, etc Other things I am learning just by watching this TV show Cartoon KAT TUN, which is like, the funniest and most entertaining show evah For example, the way they greet people, or why girls cover their mouth when they laugh Or the importance they give to their food Or how polite and respectful they are, and their nice sense of humor.Some things I may have taken for granted, or when I was reading, I was like Oh I noticed that too but never asked myself why are that Japanese people do not use the word iie, no Or that they use the word chotto a lot.A huge positive aspect in this book is that the author shares his own anecdotes with the reader Stories that involve the environment in his work, with his co workers or when he was trying to rent a room in a hotel, or the places he likes the best Stories that make the reader understandand better And most of the photos are from the author himself, not from Internet.Luckily this journey does not end here The author bless his soul has his own blog where he describes and tells usabout this amazing country, Look like GR is not going to be the only website I visit the most

  4. Daniel Doughty Daniel Doughty says:

    A series of short snippets and mundane anecdotes about Japan Informative if you know little about Japan, yet often repetitive A non essential component to visiting the country.

  5. Marrynka Marrynka says:

    Perfect book to read before traveling to Japan After reading it I feel fully prepared for my trip Book includes a lot of general information written in engaging and concise way which makes it a page turner Book includes chapters about history, traditional arts, Japanese culture and mindset, food, music, anime and manga and waybasically everything there is to know about this fascinating country Last two chapters are aimed specifically at tourist planning their trip, they are packed Perfect book to read before traveling to Japan After reading it I feel fully prepared for my trip Book includes a lot of general information written in engaging and concise way which makes it a page turner Book includes chapters about history, traditional arts, Japanese culture and mindset, food, music, anime and manga and waybasically everything there is to know about this fascinating country Last two chapters are aimed specifically at tourist planning their trip, they are packed with places to visit as well as practical advice

  6. Darjeeling Darjeeling says:

    p26 During the Edo Period, when Japan received almost no influence from foreign cultures, a number of unique arts or disciplines were developed For instance, kabuki theater appeared as a consequence of the need to entertain an increasingly flourishing society withandfree time So much for diversity being a strengthp144 is the start of a chapter on Odaiba, one of Japans many small islands In the top left corner there is a picture of the Statue Of Liberty This confused me at fi p26 During the Edo Period, when Japan received almost no influence from foreign cultures, a number of unique arts or disciplines were developed For instance, kabuki theater appeared as a consequence of the need to entertain an increasingly flourishing society withandfree time So much for diversity being a strengthp144 is the start of a chapter on Odaiba, one of Japans many small islands In the top left corner there is a picture of the Statue Of Liberty This confused me at first Turns out Japan just decided they wanted one too They also have a copy of the Eiffel Tower Talk about cultural appropriation PI found the chapter on Japanese business the most interesting, probably because it was the topic I knew the least about I also learned allot about Confucianism for similar reasons, it s one of the few eastern philosophies I haven t studied yet, and I will add a few books on the topic to my reading list It sounds fascinating, sort of like Plato s Republic which I have managed to read allot about without having actually read That s on my list too except that it actually works It s a heavily collectivist ideology, and not something I would want to live in In fact I would probably feel the need to rebel against it, just as I feel the need to rebel against collectivism in my own culture, and we can see some of the disadvantages to collectivism, as well as the advantages, in Japanese culture, which I have always had a great deal of respect for and still do I m envious of Japans low crime rate, and almost non existent terrorism Japan has a very strict immigration policy , but I also don t want to be forced into a system of mass conformity, where argument from authority is not considered a logical fallacy Sometimes you can t have your cake and eat it I do think there are some aspects of Japanese culture we can and should culturally appropriate, just as they have culturally appropriated many of the best aspects of western culture and integrated them.Peace

  7. Tanya Tosheva Tanya Tosheva says:

    This will not be so much a review of the book as my attempt to remember a gazillion facts and new Japanese words, which overwhelmed me despite already knowing some from anime and manga and being used to the sound of the language.Almost everything below is a quote.History of Japan view spoiler Legend tells that Japan was born of the love between two deities, Izanagi and Izanami These two deities had a daughter, Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her T This will not be so much a review of the book as my attempt to remember a gazillion facts and new Japanese words, which overwhelmed me despite already knowing some from anime and manga and being used to the sound of the language.Almost everything below is a quote.History of Japan view spoiler Legend tells that Japan was born of the love between two deities, Izanagi and Izanami These two deities had a daughter, Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her The first settlers whose archeological remains have been found belong to the Jomon Period,than 8,000 years ago But not until the eighth century CE is there a real Japanese state, with its first capital being Nara Between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, Japan was run as a system of flefs, or local powers subordinate to the shogun, that were always flghting one another Everything changed in the year 1600, when one of the most important events in the history of Japan took place, the battle of Sekigahara The Hideyoshi clan s defeat in this battle meant a new family became paramount, the Tokugawas, who would rule Japan until 1868 The first Tokugawa was Ieyasu, who decided to govern from his castle in Edo, present day Tokyo The period under Tokugawa rule would become known as the Edo Period 1603 1868 In July 1853, an American squadron of warships led by Commodore Matthew Perry entered Tokyo Bay Unsure what to do in the face of American cannons, the shogun, for the first time in six centuries of military power, consulted the emperor about a course of action Without hesitation, the emperor replied that they must drive the Americans away Unfortunately, the shogun didn t have the military might to expel the Americans, and he was forced to sign the agreement After disobeying the emperor, considered a living god by all the Japanese, the last of the Tokugawa shoguns lost the people s trust He had to resign, allowing the triumphal restoration of power to the imperial house hide spoiler Language of Japan view spoiler The Japanese began to develop their own writing system around the flfth century CE, based on Chinese characters called han They used the Chinese symbols to represent their own spoken language graphically, though the Chinese and Japanese grammars have nothing in common.Kanji symbols with from one to several meanings, one to several pronunciations, and can be combined to form new words This last point, while seemingly trivial, gives the greatest headaches to those studying this language and to the Japanese themselves, who must devotethan ten years to learning how to write them There arethan 40,000 kanji, but the Japanese are required to know a list of only 2,136 official kanji, known as the Joyo Kanji.Joyo Kanji A list of only 2,136 official kanji Books and newspapers using kanji that are not on this list must write their transcription in the hiragana syllabic alphabet.Katakana The katakana syllabary is used to write words of foreign origin that have been introduced into Japanese.Hiragana The 46 symbols in the hiragana syllabary represent the 46 possible consonant and vowel combinations in spoken Japanese.Romaji The transcription in Roman alphabet of how a word sounds For example, the word house is pronounced ie in Japanese, and therefore house written in romaji would be ie.A Japanese person reading romaji and this may strike us as amazing will find it difficult to understand what it says Japanese minds are designed to understand symbols and not letters.The Japanese Constitution, created under American supervision after the war, has a version written in romaji because the Americans didn t trust Japanese symbols and wanted a version that they could at least read, even if they couldn t understand it hide spoiler Do view spoiler Do originated in China five or six centuries before Christ It was Laozi or Lao Tzu who developed tao or dao In Japan it s not merely a character but a whole philosophical concept and a way of life that has been deeply rooted in Japanese thinking for centuries The Japanese seek perfection in some tasks kata as a means to acquire spiritual satisfaction in their lives.Basically, the apprenticeship system in any discipline following the Tao Zen philosophy consists of three steps 1 Establishing a series of patterns, models, or forms known as kata.2 Repeating the kata for many years.3 Perfecting and searching for beauty in the kata, joining them in a sort of enlightenment hide spoiler Interesting concepts words view spoiler honne the wishes, opinions, and true feelings every individual has tatemae social obligations and opinions that the individual has adapted to society s.From the Western point of view, concealing the truth may be looked on with disfavor In Japan, however, preserving harmony isimportant, and that s why true thoughts honne are not usually expressed in a straightforward way, for fear of hurting people s feelings We could say tatemae serves as a lubricant in human relationships It is also used in business, where established conventions have to be followed giri the obligation to care about those who have given you something in life so that you are indebted to them.The origin of giri is ancient, but it became widespread through the influence of the samurai class in the feudal era, who would feel giri toward the lord protecting their families Giri forces us to return favors, to preserve harmony in human and social relationships so that some measure of peace is maintained in society There is an extensive tradition of giving presents on special occasions and, if you receive a gift, you must always give something of the same value in return This might seem a matter of common sense in any other culture, but in Japan the amount of gift giving can be extravagant In Japan, gifts are very important within the system, and there is a series of unwritten rules that, when broken, can cause social unease The basic rule is that a gift must be nonor less valuable than the relationship between the two people.omiai arranged marriagesIn the past, it was quite common, and all decisions regarding the marriage were made by the parents on both sides Today, omiai marriages still happen, but there isfreedom Parents simply organize an appointment for their son and daughter and if it works, good, but if they don t suit each other, nothing happens There s usually not much pressure Nevertheless, one out of every ten marriages today is of the omiai kind.sumimasen Of course, it means I m sorry but in Japan it s also used to relax the tension in a conversation it s like a sign that says you understand the other person s feelings.chotto can be translated literally as a little, a minute, a moment Chotto matte kudasai Wait a minute, please However, it s used in a variety of situations to avoid expressing an unpleasant denial.amae used to describe the way we act when we wish to be loved or seek attention, when we want to depend on someone else with a certain sense of submissiveness.A universal example of amae in practice is the boy who carries the girl s books in college She could easily carry them herself, but she likes to be taken care of and the man likes to feel he s taking care of somebody Another manifestation of amae would be when you act capriciously so that your protector will let you get away with something A boy pretends to be tired so that his mother will yield and allow him to go to bed without putting his clothes in the washing machine.uchi people in your family and circle of friendssoto other peopleAt the first uchi level we find our family unit, followed by families connected to us Then, we have friends, followed by our company, and last, we have our country Thus, foreigners in Japan are about as soto as you can get that s why they say that, no matter how long you live there, you will always be treated as a gaijin The Japanese will treat you as soto simply because they unconsciously believe you are some sort of threat to their uchi harmony, and that is one of the reasons Japan is such a closed country But don t misunderstand me being treated as soto doesn t mean they treat you badly They will probably beattentive to you than your Western friends The problem is, you feel as though there is some sort of barrier This also comes through in the use of both verbal and nonverbal cues, which clearly denote whether you re entering their uchi or not.Keiretsu groups of companies that work together, trying not to compete with one another and cooperating in order to makemoney together.Kaizen literally means a change for the better and is used in Japanese business culture to express the need to improve constantly, to do things the best you can, using the fewest resources and creating the highest value.Meishi business cards, but in Japan they are an extremely important element when starting a conversation with a stranger, a client, or another company Because the meishi is so significant, you must treat it with the utmost care, as if it were part of the other person.Nemawashi an essential concept for understanding the Japanese business world It s usually translated as prior consultation To some extent, you could see nemawashi as a sort of democracy taken to the extreme Thanks to this, Japanese companies seldom make mistakes and are always taking steps forward and improving ceaselessly, if slowly.Suppose you have the brilliant idea of eliminating a redundant chip from one of the company products Before making your proposal, you must make sure that all the employees around you agree This consultation yields numerous advantages if all agree with your proposal, you have an almost one hundred percent chance it will be accepted, and if people don t accept your proposal, you can improve it so as to include everybody else s suggestions Also, if your idea is bad one, you won t make a fool of yourself, since you haven t made a formal proposal.The Sony employee will consult all his department coworkers, and, once he has made sure his proposal is accepted by everyone, he will talk with his kakaricho immediate superior His superior will then do a nemawashi among the other department heads, and once they have agreed, the process will continue until the idea reaches the highest spheres at Sony Notice how, if the nemawashi process fails somewhere along the line because someone is totally against it, the idea never flows toward the top of the pyramid.Once the nemawashi process has been completed, the department that initiated it can make a formal proposal in a meeting, where it will obviously be accepted.The Japanese avoid direct confrontation above all Employees simply go to work every day, don t complain, arrive punctually, and never leave on time they always have to work overtime.Making changes in Japan is difficult Everything is slow, there is a lot of paperwork, everybody must agree, and there are tons of meetings But when things are done, they usually work to perfection everything goes well.humility essential value for comporting oneself correctly in Japan.Let s suppose we re giving our boss some cookies At the moment we do, we must say, Sumimasen, tsumaranai mono desu ga This may be translated as, Pardon me for giving you such a petty thing In using this expression, we are praising our boss by making him understand that he really deserves a much better present The same expression would be used the other way around, if our boss gave us a present No matter what one s status, everybody in Japan must be humble to respect their way of being Sometimes it happens that someone is too ambitious and flaunts his power too much, and he ends up being ostracized by his company and society There are books about cases where a person of great promise has ended up cleaning the company bathrooms because he was too ambitious and his superiors got scared the Japanese see ambition as a threat to the inner balance of the system, which might bring them down in the future.sake means alcoholic drink in general Thus, if you drink a beer, you are drinking sake if you drink whiskey, you are drinking sake and if you drink rum, you are drinking sake.nihonshu the alcoholic beverage obtained from rice.hanami an excursion to see flowers, a centuries old tradition in Japan.Today the hanami tradition involves sitting under a sakura tree with your family, your friends, or the people at your company The main problem is the lack of room Ueno and Yoyogi Parks are jam packed, and that s why someone from the company usually goes early to scout out a place and save some room under a tree There are apparently people who will even sleep under a tree that s expected to flower the next day so they ll be able to enjoy it with their colleagues from work.The manji an ancient Buddhist symbol full of spiritual meaning Resembles a swastikas, which shocks many tourists.matsuri festivals celebrating religious mostly Shinto traditions throughout the year.ema wooden plaques with wishes written on them for the god to make come true.Jinja Shinto shrines The easiest way to identify a jinja is to look at the entrance You will almost always find a large red wooden gate marking the entrance to sacred ground In contrast, at the entrance to a Buddhist o tera, there is usually a smaller dark colored gate and walls separating the temple grounds from the outside.Ukiyo e print making art was developed during the Edo Period 1603 1868 Thanks to the ease with which ukiyo e copies could be made, they arrived in the West and influenced painters of the time, such as Vincent Van Gogh and Claude Monet.shunga mass produced ukiyo e prints of scenes of explicit sex May constitute one of the earliest pornographic markets in history onsen geisha prostitute geisha, different from those considered genuine artist geisha.chado the way of tea matcha one of Japan s most appreciated varieties of green tea and is the variety used in the tea ceremony.The main difference between matcha and other types of green tea is that, during the last weeks before harvest, the tea plants are covered so they don t get any sunlight Moreover, only the best shoots are hand picked for the matcha production, and unlike in other teas, they are ground to an extremely flne powder It is very rich in amino acids and antioxidants.Zen koan brief stories in the form of riddles or fables that Zen teachers use to teach lessons to their students According to Zen doctrine, the nature of Zen can t be taught with words, and therefore it is the student who must teach himself.Blood groups In Japan, people ask what your blood group is in the most unexpected situations Sometimes when you meet someone, they ask what your blood group is before asking you how old you are Many people believe in a host of superstitions and pseudoscientific theories that associate blood types with character.LaughterCovering your teeth with your hand is seen as a sign of good manners in Japanese women Shamelessly showing the inside of your mouth when you laugh can be seen as a sign of bad manners hide spoiler There s so muchbut I ll leave it at that For future someday visits to Tokyo I just have to remember to visit the Akihabara district

  8. Sam Still Reading Sam Still Reading says:

    A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have I love Japan and I love to learnabout it A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains muchinformation than you think at first glance Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan It includes history, social structures I learnedfrom this book than I did from six years of Japanese , cult A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have I love Japan and I love to learnabout it A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains muchinformation than you think at first glance Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan It includes history, social structures I learnedfrom this book than I did from six years of Japanese , culture, work life, leisure, anime, cosplay, vending machines, zen, Shinto, Buddhism, temples, shrines and walking tours of various places in Tokyo.What I found very interesting was that according to Hector, the Japanese wish for harmony as a whole over triumph of the individual which is very different to what occurs in the West It was also interesting to see repetition given as a way of learning if you do something hundreds of times, you will end up getting it right The work structures were also very interesting the consultation between many levels with the focus on precision If I wasn t a gaijin, I think I d like this Hector explains things very clearly in the majority of circumstances but occasionally the English sounded a little off to me for example, a lot of use of the word over This is a small thing to get used to.I learnt so much from this book,than I did over a long period of study and a long trip to Japan It clarified a lot of things for me Well done on a great book this would certainly be of use to those going to Japan or just wanting to knowabout it The pictures are excellent too

  9. Jason Keenan Jason Keenan says:

    A Geek in Japan Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony is such a great introduction to Japanese culture and the modern cool Japan we are coming to know as well as the historic Japan.The book is a fun read and may even surprise readers familiar with Japan with a few new explanations of culture and history.Don t let the title fool you A Geek in Japan really offers up a whole lot of quick highlights of what makes up life in Japan It touches on broad topics like tradi A Geek in Japan Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony is such a great introduction to Japanese culture and the modern cool Japan we are coming to know as well as the historic Japan.The book is a fun read and may even surprise readers familiar with Japan with a few new explanations of culture and history.Don t let the title fool you A Geek in Japan really offers up a whole lot of quick highlights of what makes up life in Japan It touches on broad topics like traditional culture, the Japanese character, and daily life All in all it s a wonderful introduction to what makes Japan unique.The book also has a wonderful informal tone which can help anyone planning a trip to map out their plans in a fun way

  10. Annice22 Annice22 says:

    This was very boring.However, I did enjoy seeing all the pictures that were throughout the book but I felt like I would have been better off just searching online and reading general information instead of reading this Because most of this just feels like internet research instead of feeling like a first hand account from someone who was living there.

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