Paperback ð The Sunbird eBook Þ

Paperback ð The Sunbird eBook Þ

The Sunbird [PDF / Epub] ☉ The Sunbird By Elizabeth Wein – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Eleven year old Telemakos is the grandson of two royal men one African, from the kingdom of Aksum the other Artos, the fallen High King of Britain He is also a remarkable listener and tracker Now his Eleven year old Telemakos is the grandson of two royal men one African, from the kingdom of Aksum the other Artos, the fallen High King of Britain He is also a remarkable listener and tracker Now his country needs his skill Even though there is a quarantine, plague is spreading through Aksum, leaving disease and death in its wake Telemakos is recruited as the emperor s spy He must travel through the brutal desert to the salt mines of Afar there, he needs to discover who has been traitor to the crown This challenge will take all of Telemakos s skill and strength and his ability to stay silent for if he is discovered, there will be no mercy.


About the Author: Elizabeth Wein

Paste Magazine has listed Code Name Verity as the best YA novel of the decade The full list is here.



10 thoughts on “The Sunbird

  1. Sherwood Smith Sherwood Smith says:

    Intense, spare and vivid, this story builds, with subtle characterizations, and some sharply dramatic and painful moments.I ve recommended it to readers who like Megan Whalen Turner s work, and heard back that this was a successful pairing.


  2. Katie Montgomery Katie Montgomery says:

    SERIOUSLY WEIN WHY ARE YOU SUCH A BADASS.


  3. kari kari says:

    It s been weeks since I read it and I am still FURIOUS at Medraut.


  4. Kim (magicsandwiches) Lawyer Kim (magicsandwiches) Lawyer says:

    Megan Whalen Turner was once asked if there was one book she evangelized and she replied, The Sunbird by Elizabeth Wein After reading it, I know why.My favorite of the Lion Hunter s series, The Sunbird is an amazing adventure story told through the eyes of Telemakos, an intelligent and nimble eleven year old boy As a member of the royal household and one who often roams the palace freely, Telemakos fades into the background as a natural part of the landscape Because no one takes notice of h Megan Whalen Turner was once asked if there was one book she evangelized and she replied, The Sunbird by Elizabeth Wein After reading it, I know why.My favorite of the Lion Hunter s series, The Sunbird is an amazing adventure story told through the eyes of Telemakos, an intelligent and nimble eleven year old boy As a member of the royal household and one who often roams the palace freely, Telemakos fades into the background as a natural part of the landscape Because no one takes notice of him, he realizes this makes him invisible and therefore capable of spying on anyone anywhere in the palace When he passes a challenge from the emperor to do just that, he is sent on an important but dangerous mission to discover who is defying the quarantine that should keep Ethiopia safe from the plague that decimated Britain Of course things don t go as planned and Telemakos must use all of his wits, tenacity, and courage to triumph A subplot about family relations ends in a way so satisfying that I just sat there and cried happy tears when I finished the book


  5. TheBookSmugglers TheBookSmugglers says:

    Original review posted on The Book SmugglersThe Sunbird is the third book in Elizabeth Wein s Arthurian Aksumite cycle of stories which follows the descendants of King Artos of Britain and their lives in sixth century Aksum, Africa present day Ethiopia Although part of an ongoing series, The Sunbird can definitely be read as a standalone although I did have a few questions about previous happenings in the series, the most urgent one being how and why exactly did the descendants of King Arth Original review posted on The Book SmugglersThe Sunbird is the third book in Elizabeth Wein s Arthurian Aksumite cycle of stories which follows the descendants of King Artos of Britain and their lives in sixth century Aksum, Africa present day Ethiopia Although part of an ongoing series, The Sunbird can definitely be read as a standalone although I did have a few questions about previous happenings in the series, the most urgent one being how and why exactly did the descendants of King Arthur end up in Africa I shall have to go back and read the first two books in the series The Winter Prince and A Coalition of Lions both already purchased and added to my TBR pile The Plague is spreading in Europe and even though quarantine has been set in the Aksumite Empire, the plague breaks through and begins to spread This story follows young prince Telemakos, the son of Medraut son of King Artos and Turunesh daughter of Kidane, member of the imperial parliament of Aksum , as he is tasked by his aunt Goewin, the British ambassador to Aksum, with the dangerous mission of investigating who is responsible for it Telemakos is a clever, resourceful boy who is constantly overlooked and underestimated because of his youth and his mixed race status Using these to his advantage, he is able to learn key information to help the Kingdom and is eventually sent on a journey across the Empire to learna journey which will have terrible consequences.Overall, I really enjoyed The Sunbird it is a short yet extremely well developed story It has moments of great gravitas especially those that deal with courage and loyalty and the moments where the story dealt with the relationship between Telemakos and his father Medraut There is a great comparison between their relationship and that of the mythology Telemakos and his father Ulysses The latter deals with an absent father and the hope for his return whereas our Telemakos has to deal with a father who is present but who won t use words to communicate with Telemakos his muteness is a self imposed punishment for past deeds and frustratingly difficult for Teleamakos to understand I also really appreciated the strong female characters with agency and the high stakes of the story Telemakos is a really dangerous mission and the author doesn t shy away from it and there are horrendous scenes of torture that were really hard to read.I loved its protagonist above all Telemakos is a great, intrepid hero whose reluctant acceptance of his mission is coupled with his own cheeky certainty that he is the only one who can pull it off He is at times old beyond his years and at others, a youngster who wants nothing to be cuddled by his family I loved the Ethiopian setting as well, although I can t really attest to any historical accuracy when it comes to the Kingdom of Aksum I am not really sure historical accuracy comes into play here considering this is a Fantasy novel about King Arthur.Beyond that, I had extremely high expectations for The Sunbird considering that 1 the author wrote Code Name Verity which is so far my favourite 2012 read and 2 the main character of this book has been compared to Megan Whalen Turner s Eugenides, one of my favourite characters of all time In hindsight, this was probably not a good thing and I will admit that those expectations were impossible to be met Although Telemakos did remind me of a young Eugenides from The Thief for his cleverness and cocky demeanour, I think the fact that narrative here doesn t have the unreliability factor akin to Megan Whalen Turner s books, makes this comparison a bit too extreme This is perhaps, an unfair assessment but expectations are expectations and I believe I have to be clear in this regard Funnily enough, I think The Sunbird hasthings in common with Code Name Verity and its themes of courage and patriotism despite their wildly different setting.One thing is certain though Code Name Verity was not a fluke and Elizabeth Wein has just become a new favourite author


  6. Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) says:

    Third book in the series and could not put it down Would not have thought the tale of an eleven year old boy would draw me in like this one did But of course it is the continuation of a fascinating story, and I am already drawn into the lives around him These books are very roughly based on the Arthur legend, particularly Mordred although he has a different name in these and is called Medraut He also has a far different role in the story that began in The Winter Prince where the tense and an Third book in the series and could not put it down Would not have thought the tale of an eleven year old boy would draw me in like this one did But of course it is the continuation of a fascinating story, and I am already drawn into the lives around him These books are very roughly based on the Arthur legend, particularly Mordred although he has a different name in these and is called Medraut He also has a far different role in the story that began in The Winter Prince where the tense and anguished relationship of love hate between him and his half brother has stayed with me since reading it of course in the Arthur legend he did not have a brother Elizabeth Wein has a different style of writing and it certainly has worked for me The first book in the series was written in the first person as Medraut writes to his mother, the witch Morgana The other books are written in the third person and both worked well.Telemakos is the son of Medraut conceived when he served in Ethiopia prior to the events in the first book He is the grandson of two nobles of different lands and has a certain freedom in the African Kingdom of Aksum He is wise beyond his years and has the ability to become invisible not really invisible and hear and see things he reports back to his aunt, Goewin, who is Britain s ambassador to Aksum She is his father Medraut s half sister Goewin loves him but the Kingdom has been quarantined because of plague and they must find out who is breaking the quarantine and put a stop to it or all could die Thus she and others must place a spy in a very distant land across the desert.In this book Telemakos volunteers to go on that very dangerous journey and every step of it was brilliantly written as this young boy faces terrible hardships Good books are all about good writing and this one passed the test I won t go into the details and do spoilers, but this series is rapidly becoming one I will re read in the future and not forget These books are kind of hard to find I have the fifth one and must find the fourth one


  7. Nicky Nicky says:

    I think I liked The Sunbird best of the series so far It goes even further from Arthurian myth the only character from the Arthurian canon is Medraut but in the process makes an enchanting narrative Young Telemakos is growing up and showing all signs of inheriting his father s ability to stalk prey, but he uses his skills politically.The story of his search for the figure called the Lazarus, and what happens to him there, are compelling The darkness from the other stories remains here I think I liked The Sunbird best of the series so far It goes even further from Arthurian myth the only character from the Arthurian canon is Medraut but in the process makes an enchanting narrative Young Telemakos is growing up and showing all signs of inheriting his father s ability to stalk prey, but he uses his skills politically.The story of his search for the figure called the Lazarus, and what happens to him there, are compelling The darkness from the other stories remains here Telemakos is a very strong character, almost unbelievably so, and yet still believably a child, too The reactions of the other characters to what happens to him feels real and shocking, and is well handled.Medraut as a character develops further here, into someone one can like, or at least sympathise with a little largely divorced from the Arthurian canon, by this point.Again, it s easy to read, well written, but there are parts at which the soft hearted will struggle


  8. Rachel Neumeier Rachel Neumeier says:

    Not the first in the series, but it stands alone and it s my favorite though I like them all Ordinarily I think doing any kind of spin on the Arthurian legend is a bad idea, but Elizabeth Wein can handle it and anyway, The Sunbird is pretty far removed from the legend.The writing is superb, Telemakos is one of my all time favorite YA protagonists, the setting the African kingdom of Aksum is fabulous But there is some grim, grim, grim violence in this book, some of the worst I ve eve Not the first in the series, but it stands alone and it s my favorite though I like them all Ordinarily I think doing any kind of spin on the Arthurian legend is a bad idea, but Elizabeth Wein can handle it and anyway, The Sunbird is pretty far removed from the legend.The writing is superb, Telemakos is one of my all time favorite YA protagonists, the setting the African kingdom of Aksum is fabulous But there is some grim, grim, grim violence in this book, some of the worst I ve ever seen in YA stories, so be warned.Even so, note the five stars The violence isn t gratuitous, it IS integral to the story, it DOES work, and I love and admire this bookthan words can say Anything else this author writes, let me tell you, I m right there


  9. Em Em says:

    For me, The Sunbird is Elizabeth Wein s Prisoner of Azkaban the third book in an already excellent series that goes out and takes it to another level The first two books in her Lion Hunter series are beautifully written character studies and political intrigues, just like this one is, but they set up the backstory that allows The Sunbird to soar.Like most Arthurian adaptations, The Sunbird is about a royal bastard who saves the kingdom Unlike most Arthurian adaptations, this royal bastard is For me, The Sunbird is Elizabeth Wein s Prisoner of Azkaban the third book in an already excellent series that goes out and takes it to another level The first two books in her Lion Hunter series are beautifully written character studies and political intrigues, just like this one is, but they set up the backstory that allows The Sunbird to soar.Like most Arthurian adaptations, The Sunbird is about a royal bastard who saves the kingdom Unlike most Arthurian adaptations, this royal bastard is no king in fact, his greatest asset is that no one notices him and the kingdom he s trying to save isn t Britain A plague is spreading across Aksum modern day Ethiopia thanks to black market salt traders who defy the emperor s quarantine Eleven year old Telemakos has the skill and the courage to root out the traitors but does he have the time At its core, though, this story isn t about political espionage or thrilling heroics It s about family The loneliness of a biracial boy whose father has taken a vow of silence The love and hate of two siblings still haunted by their brother s premature death and their own misdeeds The fear that the past will repeat itself These characters are beautifully flawed They make mistakes because they live in a dangerous and largely historically accurate world that forces them to make difficult choices, not because they re careless or callous.Is Telemakos too much of a prodigy, being able to smell blood from over a mile away and memorize sentences in a language he doesn t know Perhaps But he s also a fully fleshed out character with contradictions that run deeper than his dual heritage He s simultaneously overconfident and terrified He s allowed to weep out of both sorrow and joy He runs, mud spattered and bloody, into a highbrow party because he doesn t know how to deal with his father s affection the same affection that he cravesthan anything else In short, he s one of the most likable protagonists I ve come across in some time, evenso because he is so in tune with his emotions You don t often see male protagonists who feel things deeply and are open about it.Wein is also incredibly economical with her storytelling Other authors would prolong Telemakos s adventure, but what Wein describes is muchreal three months of brutality and loneliness for a few minutes of useful information and with it, agonizing pain She lets readers find meaning in the allusions and doesn t waste words In fact, silence is perhaps the biggest theme of the novel.The only reason not to read this book would be if violence, especially toward children, disturbs you It s not gratuitous, but it is graphic.It is an insult that this book only has 353 ratings and 73 reviews I picked up my first Elizabeth Wein book in December and just finished my fourth Safe to say, you can judge her books by their cover if her name s on it, you re in good hands I am both excited and terrified to move on to the fourth book in this series, The Lion Hunter Partially because I don t want this series to end, and partially because I m afraid that it s going to be Elizabeth Wein s Goblet of Fire in terms of how happy the ending is


  10. Chachic Chachic says:

    Read this again for EWein Special Ops It was just as good as I remembered I was still afraid for Telemakos even though I already knew what was going to happen ___________________2010 review Originally posted here.Ms Wein blends Arthurian legend and sixth century Ethiopian history in her books Telemakos, the main protagonist of this book, is the son of Medraut Mordred, Arthur s son If you re a fan of Arthurian novels, I definitely recommend Ms Wein s novels But even if you aren t, I Read this again for EWein Special Ops It was just as good as I remembered I was still afraid for Telemakos even though I already knew what was going to happen ___________________2010 review Originally posted here.Ms Wein blends Arthurian legend and sixth century Ethiopian history in her books Telemakos, the main protagonist of this book, is the son of Medraut Mordred, Arthur s son If you re a fan of Arthurian novels, I definitely recommend Ms Wein s novels But even if you aren t, I still recommend them I haven t read a lot of Arthurian books and I thoroughly enjoyed this one Telemakos is such a talented child and so mature for his age There were times when I was reading the book that I couldn t believe he s just a young boy He s a very curious person so he trained himself to be stealthy and this skill has earned him a dangerous task This book only has around two hundred pages but all of those pages are packed with a gripping story and you won t be able to let go until you finish the entire thing I m still amazed at how vibrant this story is for its length.As with most of my favorite books, the characters in this one stand out I remember that a member of Sounis calls Miles Vorkosigan as Gen in Space and I remember that Telemakos was labeled as Gen in Africa Here are some of their similarities they come from noble families, they re both trained in stealth, they re both highly intelligent individuals with a certain skill set and both MWT and Ms Wein are not afraid to make their characters go through very difficult situations I m going to stop there because I don t want to reveal any spoilers but rest assured that the secondary characters in this book are just as interesting as Telemakos is.The Sunbird can be read on its own but I think it s better to have the Mark of Solomon duology on hand because those are the next books that feature Telemakos The Lion Hunter and The Empty Kingdom After reading The Sunbird, you re going to wantof Telemakos and the rest of the characters in this book


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10 thoughts on “The Sunbird

  1. Sherwood Smith Sherwood Smith says:

    Intense, spare and vivid, this story builds, with subtle characterizations, and some sharply dramatic and painful moments.I ve recommended it to readers who like Megan Whalen Turner s work, and heard back that this was a successful pairing.

  2. Katie Montgomery Katie Montgomery says:

    SERIOUSLY WEIN WHY ARE YOU SUCH A BADASS.

  3. kari kari says:

    It s been weeks since I read it and I am still FURIOUS at Medraut.

  4. Kim (magicsandwiches) Lawyer Kim (magicsandwiches) Lawyer says:

    Megan Whalen Turner was once asked if there was one book she evangelized and she replied, The Sunbird by Elizabeth Wein After reading it, I know why.My favorite of the Lion Hunter s series, The Sunbird is an amazing adventure story told through the eyes of Telemakos, an intelligent and nimble eleven year old boy As a member of the royal household and one who often roams the palace freely, Telemakos fades into the background as a natural part of the landscape Because no one takes notice of h Megan Whalen Turner was once asked if there was one book she evangelized and she replied, The Sunbird by Elizabeth Wein After reading it, I know why.My favorite of the Lion Hunter s series, The Sunbird is an amazing adventure story told through the eyes of Telemakos, an intelligent and nimble eleven year old boy As a member of the royal household and one who often roams the palace freely, Telemakos fades into the background as a natural part of the landscape Because no one takes notice of him, he realizes this makes him invisible and therefore capable of spying on anyone anywhere in the palace When he passes a challenge from the emperor to do just that, he is sent on an important but dangerous mission to discover who is defying the quarantine that should keep Ethiopia safe from the plague that decimated Britain Of course things don t go as planned and Telemakos must use all of his wits, tenacity, and courage to triumph A subplot about family relations ends in a way so satisfying that I just sat there and cried happy tears when I finished the book

  5. TheBookSmugglers TheBookSmugglers says:

    Original review posted on The Book SmugglersThe Sunbird is the third book in Elizabeth Wein s Arthurian Aksumite cycle of stories which follows the descendants of King Artos of Britain and their lives in sixth century Aksum, Africa present day Ethiopia Although part of an ongoing series, The Sunbird can definitely be read as a standalone although I did have a few questions about previous happenings in the series, the most urgent one being how and why exactly did the descendants of King Arth Original review posted on The Book SmugglersThe Sunbird is the third book in Elizabeth Wein s Arthurian Aksumite cycle of stories which follows the descendants of King Artos of Britain and their lives in sixth century Aksum, Africa present day Ethiopia Although part of an ongoing series, The Sunbird can definitely be read as a standalone although I did have a few questions about previous happenings in the series, the most urgent one being how and why exactly did the descendants of King Arthur end up in Africa I shall have to go back and read the first two books in the series The Winter Prince and A Coalition of Lions both already purchased and added to my TBR pile The Plague is spreading in Europe and even though quarantine has been set in the Aksumite Empire, the plague breaks through and begins to spread This story follows young prince Telemakos, the son of Medraut son of King Artos and Turunesh daughter of Kidane, member of the imperial parliament of Aksum , as he is tasked by his aunt Goewin, the British ambassador to Aksum, with the dangerous mission of investigating who is responsible for it Telemakos is a clever, resourceful boy who is constantly overlooked and underestimated because of his youth and his mixed race status Using these to his advantage, he is able to learn key information to help the Kingdom and is eventually sent on a journey across the Empire to learna journey which will have terrible consequences.Overall, I really enjoyed The Sunbird it is a short yet extremely well developed story It has moments of great gravitas especially those that deal with courage and loyalty and the moments where the story dealt with the relationship between Telemakos and his father Medraut There is a great comparison between their relationship and that of the mythology Telemakos and his father Ulysses The latter deals with an absent father and the hope for his return whereas our Telemakos has to deal with a father who is present but who won t use words to communicate with Telemakos his muteness is a self imposed punishment for past deeds and frustratingly difficult for Teleamakos to understand I also really appreciated the strong female characters with agency and the high stakes of the story Telemakos is a really dangerous mission and the author doesn t shy away from it and there are horrendous scenes of torture that were really hard to read.I loved its protagonist above all Telemakos is a great, intrepid hero whose reluctant acceptance of his mission is coupled with his own cheeky certainty that he is the only one who can pull it off He is at times old beyond his years and at others, a youngster who wants nothing to be cuddled by his family I loved the Ethiopian setting as well, although I can t really attest to any historical accuracy when it comes to the Kingdom of Aksum I am not really sure historical accuracy comes into play here considering this is a Fantasy novel about King Arthur.Beyond that, I had extremely high expectations for The Sunbird considering that 1 the author wrote Code Name Verity which is so far my favourite 2012 read and 2 the main character of this book has been compared to Megan Whalen Turner s Eugenides, one of my favourite characters of all time In hindsight, this was probably not a good thing and I will admit that those expectations were impossible to be met Although Telemakos did remind me of a young Eugenides from The Thief for his cleverness and cocky demeanour, I think the fact that narrative here doesn t have the unreliability factor akin to Megan Whalen Turner s books, makes this comparison a bit too extreme This is perhaps, an unfair assessment but expectations are expectations and I believe I have to be clear in this regard Funnily enough, I think The Sunbird hasthings in common with Code Name Verity and its themes of courage and patriotism despite their wildly different setting.One thing is certain though Code Name Verity was not a fluke and Elizabeth Wein has just become a new favourite author

  6. Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) says:

    Third book in the series and could not put it down Would not have thought the tale of an eleven year old boy would draw me in like this one did But of course it is the continuation of a fascinating story, and I am already drawn into the lives around him These books are very roughly based on the Arthur legend, particularly Mordred although he has a different name in these and is called Medraut He also has a far different role in the story that began in The Winter Prince where the tense and an Third book in the series and could not put it down Would not have thought the tale of an eleven year old boy would draw me in like this one did But of course it is the continuation of a fascinating story, and I am already drawn into the lives around him These books are very roughly based on the Arthur legend, particularly Mordred although he has a different name in these and is called Medraut He also has a far different role in the story that began in The Winter Prince where the tense and anguished relationship of love hate between him and his half brother has stayed with me since reading it of course in the Arthur legend he did not have a brother Elizabeth Wein has a different style of writing and it certainly has worked for me The first book in the series was written in the first person as Medraut writes to his mother, the witch Morgana The other books are written in the third person and both worked well.Telemakos is the son of Medraut conceived when he served in Ethiopia prior to the events in the first book He is the grandson of two nobles of different lands and has a certain freedom in the African Kingdom of Aksum He is wise beyond his years and has the ability to become invisible not really invisible and hear and see things he reports back to his aunt, Goewin, who is Britain s ambassador to Aksum She is his father Medraut s half sister Goewin loves him but the Kingdom has been quarantined because of plague and they must find out who is breaking the quarantine and put a stop to it or all could die Thus she and others must place a spy in a very distant land across the desert.In this book Telemakos volunteers to go on that very dangerous journey and every step of it was brilliantly written as this young boy faces terrible hardships Good books are all about good writing and this one passed the test I won t go into the details and do spoilers, but this series is rapidly becoming one I will re read in the future and not forget These books are kind of hard to find I have the fifth one and must find the fourth one

  7. Nicky Nicky says:

    I think I liked The Sunbird best of the series so far It goes even further from Arthurian myth the only character from the Arthurian canon is Medraut but in the process makes an enchanting narrative Young Telemakos is growing up and showing all signs of inheriting his father s ability to stalk prey, but he uses his skills politically.The story of his search for the figure called the Lazarus, and what happens to him there, are compelling The darkness from the other stories remains here I think I liked The Sunbird best of the series so far It goes even further from Arthurian myth the only character from the Arthurian canon is Medraut but in the process makes an enchanting narrative Young Telemakos is growing up and showing all signs of inheriting his father s ability to stalk prey, but he uses his skills politically.The story of his search for the figure called the Lazarus, and what happens to him there, are compelling The darkness from the other stories remains here Telemakos is a very strong character, almost unbelievably so, and yet still believably a child, too The reactions of the other characters to what happens to him feels real and shocking, and is well handled.Medraut as a character develops further here, into someone one can like, or at least sympathise with a little largely divorced from the Arthurian canon, by this point.Again, it s easy to read, well written, but there are parts at which the soft hearted will struggle

  8. Rachel Neumeier Rachel Neumeier says:

    Not the first in the series, but it stands alone and it s my favorite though I like them all Ordinarily I think doing any kind of spin on the Arthurian legend is a bad idea, but Elizabeth Wein can handle it and anyway, The Sunbird is pretty far removed from the legend.The writing is superb, Telemakos is one of my all time favorite YA protagonists, the setting the African kingdom of Aksum is fabulous But there is some grim, grim, grim violence in this book, some of the worst I ve eve Not the first in the series, but it stands alone and it s my favorite though I like them all Ordinarily I think doing any kind of spin on the Arthurian legend is a bad idea, but Elizabeth Wein can handle it and anyway, The Sunbird is pretty far removed from the legend.The writing is superb, Telemakos is one of my all time favorite YA protagonists, the setting the African kingdom of Aksum is fabulous But there is some grim, grim, grim violence in this book, some of the worst I ve ever seen in YA stories, so be warned.Even so, note the five stars The violence isn t gratuitous, it IS integral to the story, it DOES work, and I love and admire this bookthan words can say Anything else this author writes, let me tell you, I m right there

  9. Em Em says:

    For me, The Sunbird is Elizabeth Wein s Prisoner of Azkaban the third book in an already excellent series that goes out and takes it to another level The first two books in her Lion Hunter series are beautifully written character studies and political intrigues, just like this one is, but they set up the backstory that allows The Sunbird to soar.Like most Arthurian adaptations, The Sunbird is about a royal bastard who saves the kingdom Unlike most Arthurian adaptations, this royal bastard is For me, The Sunbird is Elizabeth Wein s Prisoner of Azkaban the third book in an already excellent series that goes out and takes it to another level The first two books in her Lion Hunter series are beautifully written character studies and political intrigues, just like this one is, but they set up the backstory that allows The Sunbird to soar.Like most Arthurian adaptations, The Sunbird is about a royal bastard who saves the kingdom Unlike most Arthurian adaptations, this royal bastard is no king in fact, his greatest asset is that no one notices him and the kingdom he s trying to save isn t Britain A plague is spreading across Aksum modern day Ethiopia thanks to black market salt traders who defy the emperor s quarantine Eleven year old Telemakos has the skill and the courage to root out the traitors but does he have the time At its core, though, this story isn t about political espionage or thrilling heroics It s about family The loneliness of a biracial boy whose father has taken a vow of silence The love and hate of two siblings still haunted by their brother s premature death and their own misdeeds The fear that the past will repeat itself These characters are beautifully flawed They make mistakes because they live in a dangerous and largely historically accurate world that forces them to make difficult choices, not because they re careless or callous.Is Telemakos too much of a prodigy, being able to smell blood from over a mile away and memorize sentences in a language he doesn t know Perhaps But he s also a fully fleshed out character with contradictions that run deeper than his dual heritage He s simultaneously overconfident and terrified He s allowed to weep out of both sorrow and joy He runs, mud spattered and bloody, into a highbrow party because he doesn t know how to deal with his father s affection the same affection that he cravesthan anything else In short, he s one of the most likable protagonists I ve come across in some time, evenso because he is so in tune with his emotions You don t often see male protagonists who feel things deeply and are open about it.Wein is also incredibly economical with her storytelling Other authors would prolong Telemakos s adventure, but what Wein describes is muchreal three months of brutality and loneliness for a few minutes of useful information and with it, agonizing pain She lets readers find meaning in the allusions and doesn t waste words In fact, silence is perhaps the biggest theme of the novel.The only reason not to read this book would be if violence, especially toward children, disturbs you It s not gratuitous, but it is graphic.It is an insult that this book only has 353 ratings and 73 reviews I picked up my first Elizabeth Wein book in December and just finished my fourth Safe to say, you can judge her books by their cover if her name s on it, you re in good hands I am both excited and terrified to move on to the fourth book in this series, The Lion Hunter Partially because I don t want this series to end, and partially because I m afraid that it s going to be Elizabeth Wein s Goblet of Fire in terms of how happy the ending is

  10. Chachic Chachic says:

    Read this again for EWein Special Ops It was just as good as I remembered I was still afraid for Telemakos even though I already knew what was going to happen ___________________2010 review Originally posted here.Ms Wein blends Arthurian legend and sixth century Ethiopian history in her books Telemakos, the main protagonist of this book, is the son of Medraut Mordred, Arthur s son If you re a fan of Arthurian novels, I definitely recommend Ms Wein s novels But even if you aren t, I Read this again for EWein Special Ops It was just as good as I remembered I was still afraid for Telemakos even though I already knew what was going to happen ___________________2010 review Originally posted here.Ms Wein blends Arthurian legend and sixth century Ethiopian history in her books Telemakos, the main protagonist of this book, is the son of Medraut Mordred, Arthur s son If you re a fan of Arthurian novels, I definitely recommend Ms Wein s novels But even if you aren t, I still recommend them I haven t read a lot of Arthurian books and I thoroughly enjoyed this one Telemakos is such a talented child and so mature for his age There were times when I was reading the book that I couldn t believe he s just a young boy He s a very curious person so he trained himself to be stealthy and this skill has earned him a dangerous task This book only has around two hundred pages but all of those pages are packed with a gripping story and you won t be able to let go until you finish the entire thing I m still amazed at how vibrant this story is for its length.As with most of my favorite books, the characters in this one stand out I remember that a member of Sounis calls Miles Vorkosigan as Gen in Space and I remember that Telemakos was labeled as Gen in Africa Here are some of their similarities they come from noble families, they re both trained in stealth, they re both highly intelligent individuals with a certain skill set and both MWT and Ms Wein are not afraid to make their characters go through very difficult situations I m going to stop there because I don t want to reveal any spoilers but rest assured that the secondary characters in this book are just as interesting as Telemakos is.The Sunbird can be read on its own but I think it s better to have the Mark of Solomon duology on hand because those are the next books that feature Telemakos The Lion Hunter and The Empty Kingdom After reading The Sunbird, you re going to wantof Telemakos and the rest of the characters in this book

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