Liza of Lambeth PDF º Liza of PDF or Paperback

Liza of Lambeth PDF º Liza of PDF or Paperback

Liza of Lambeth ✑ Liza of Lambeth pdf ✓ Author W. Somerset Maugham – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Into the East End of the nineties came a young medical student; from this experience of the life that was hard unpredictable and sordid emerged one of the greatest novelists of this century And this i Into the East End of the nineties came a young medical student; from this experience of the life that was hard unpredictable and sordid emerged one of the greatest novelists of this century And this is his first novel the story of Liza of PDF or strongwilled Liza who overstepped the conventions of her world.


10 thoughts on “Liza of Lambeth

  1. Duane Duane says:

    This story is set in Lambeth a working class neighborhood in London around the end of the 19th century Liza Kemp is an 18 year old factory worker living with her sickly mother Liza is a very outgoing and likeable girl a favorite with the boys especially young Tom who is in love with her But trouble begins when Jim Blakeston moves into the neighborhood Jim is a 40 year old married man with children but he has an eye for Liza and when he starts showering her with affection she is powerless to resist Their relationship can only end badly and the story winds it's way to it's inevitable conclusion


  2. Alice (MTB/Alice Tied The Bookish Knot) Alice (MTB/Alice Tied The Bookish Knot) says:

    If you like classic books please subscribe to my classics book blog wwwalicereadsclassicswordpresscom I purchased this during my birthday holiday in Hay On Wye back in July and only decided to pick up and read this last night since the story length was just under 140 pages long Not hearing much about W Somerset Maugham before going into Liza of Lambeth I wasn't sure what to expect or how his writing style was going to be like as a first time reader But for a uick interesting read Liza of Lambeth did the trick My Vintage Classics edition of the book has an author's note at the very start before the actual novel talking about his writing process and how Liza of Lambeth was his first novel This I found extremely interesting since finding out about the history of past authors from the 18001900s appeals to me From this note he explains how this book is his first novel and his experiences living in London at the time of writing it Throughout the story setting it's clear to see that he portrayed a visual image of London's streets well just because he physically went out to research the surrounding areas The story follows eighteen year old Liza who is a very mischievous character and likes to run up and down the streets and attract the street guys that live close to her and her Mum In Vere Street Lambeth she is very well known by the locals and the area is very run down A guy called Tom who she has known for a while proposes to her but she declines A new guy called Jim arrives in the area with his family and soon falls head over heels in love with Liza but he is married setting up the story of an affair gone extremely wrong The way the characters spoke in the book using words like Mornin and Yer shows that W Somerset Maugham actually took time to listen to how people in London spoke and made the story realistic to me as a reader over 100 years on after it was first published The ending was a real surprise to me story length could have been a little bit longer since some of the scenes felt rushed but for a first novel it was uick visual and eye openingMy social mediasTwitter wwwTwittercomMarriedToBooks3Instagram wwwInstagramcomalicetiedthebookishBook Blog 1 wwwmarriedtobooksreviewsandblogword


  3. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    I liked this book so I am giving it three stars Please do not think a three star book is not worth reading Give it a chance; it takes a while to get pulled inOne can look at this book in two waysYou can look at the plot and see what happens There are three let’s say four central characters Liza Kemp is eighteen and lives in Lambeth a slum area in southern London The year is 1887 We follow what happens from August to December of that year She is vibrant she is bewitching she has zest and she loves to live and of course she is interested in men She has a beau—Tom but she is bored by him So guess what there turns up another His name is Jim Blakeston but he is married has five kids and is about twenty years her senior As you might guess she falls for him The fourth character is Liza’s mother Another interesting character is a midwife Mrs Hodges She lives upstairs in the same building as the Kemps I did not guess how the story would end but I did guess uite a bit along the way The plot line is just not all that uniue The second way of looking at the book is by observing the milieu the London slum area and its inhabitants that reside there It is this that I liked The author wrote Liza of Lambeth while he was a medical student interning at the obstetric unit of St Thomas’ Hospital in Lambeth There is the connection Maugham is writing about people and a milieu he knows It is for this reason that what is described is perceived as so very real We see life on the street the brawls the drinking and the dancing Domestic violence high mortality and lack of health care are the norm Gender roles are portrayed in a stereotypical fashion We are not delivered a fairy tale story or a didactic lesson What the characters do feel and say may not always be nice but is believable We are given a mirror image of reality I’ll take reality any day over fantasyI listened to an audiobook narrated by Annie Adlington The author’s characters speak a South London dialect Unusual slang words shortened words and idioms pepper the dialogs Adlington uses what sounds to me like a pronounced Cockney accent This reflects the author’s written words well but makes the lines even difficult to understand From the context one can usually grasp approximately what is meant Due to the dialect and depending upon one’s own capability and preference it might be better to choose the paper book I have given the narration three stars Clarity is important to meMy ratings of Maugham’s booksMrs Craddock 4 starsCakes and Ale 4 starsThe Painted Veil 4 starsLiza of Lambeth 3 starsThe Razor's Edge 3 starsChristmas Holiday 3 starsTheatre 2 starsThe Moon and Sixpence 2 starsOf Human Bondage 2 stars


  4. classic reverie classic reverie says:

    I am reading first novels from some of my favorite authors and Somerset Maugham was on my listHaving read Of Human Bondage this year it was fresh in my mind and I could not help compare Liza and Mildred Mildred was such a despicable character whereas Liza had a good heart but it sent her in the wrong direction Maugham's female characters are uite strong in mind The Londoner's dialect is manageable and I kept thinking of Eliza Doolittle from My Fair Lady as I read the story Maugham was accused of being overly influenced by novels like Arthur Morrison's Child of Jago which lead to critics accusing him of copying the slum atmosphere not having read Morrison yet I can not comment myself until I read Jago Maugham's slum has marriage troubles drunkenness abuse and starvation but it also has a spirit of enjoying life when one can so life is not all bleak and dreary When Liza comes into the neighborhood it brightened but her life soon changed and all around her after a chance encounter I did not read this edition by Delphi collection of his works An unforgettable tale really he did know how to make them memorable or at least they are for me


  5. Mikey B. Mikey B. says:

    This is Somerset Maugham’s first published story a short novel or novelette – and it shows The only real character is Liza the others are caricatures and not well rounded Liza is a rambunctious and lively teenage girl of eighteen – and that in itself is a departure from some of the stereotypes of woman portrayed in the literature of the eraThe story takes place in a lower class area of London and the scenes and settings are raw view spoiler for example the fight between the two women at the story’s end hide spoiler


  6. Sandhya Sandhya says:

    Liza Of Lambeth 1897 is perhaps Maugham's only novel which I don't have the heart to revisit Not because it is poor but because it is so chillingly tragic It isn't as if his other novels are all light and sunshine Maugham in fact always had a great eye for human tragedy and unfailingly took up themes about the impossibility of love and the doomed nature of marriages Almost every single novel of his has a grim death in it but nothing is as brutal as what one witnesses in Liza of Lambeth The graphic violence and the extreme misfortune of the lead character evoke a deep sense of horrorThe book was written by Maugham when he was all of 23 It was his first attempt at writing a novel and this he did while practising as a doctor His work took him to the doorsteps of the poor and needy in the slums of Lambeth and it is his experience and observations here that gave him the material for the book To his own surprise the novel was fairly well received when it was published and soon Maugham got offers to writeThe novel is Maugham’s shortest and also most unlike his other works Liza of Lambeth appears distinct because it is so removed from the world the author generally sets his stories in ie upper class London Here in a ghetto where the labour class resides the mood and tenor are vastly altered Also a large part of the book comprises of conversations in the local slang which makes it that much tougher to read Yet the story is engaging and in the end fans of the author will recogonise many things in the novel that only Maugham could have writtenthe rest


  7. Faye Faye says:

    Read July 2017Rating 45 starsW Somerset Maugham's first novel follows eighteen year old Liza a factory worker in the poor South London district of Lambeth The novel is written in the Cockney collouial dialect which makes it a little difficult to follow initially Maugham tackles a lot of social issues at once in this short tragic novel; the burden of bearing multiple children drunkenness domestic violence and infidelity to name a few Despite the hardship in the lives of Liza and the others there are some moments of happiness and humour which made the characters and the lives they're living realistic It is a very short book like a novella my copy is only 93 pages long and I think it is definitely worth a read for anyone interested in late Victorian fiction


  8. Stephen Hayes Stephen Hayes says:

    This is Somerset Maugham's first published novel and of those of his that I've read I think I like this one the best About 12 years ago I bought several of his books cheap at a library sale put them on a shelf and forgot them and in the course of tidying the shelves I took them down to read so I've been reading one after the other Liza of Lambeth is based on Maugham's experience as a medical student in a poor part of London Well it's poor in parts I once went to a garden party at Lambeth Palace the London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury and there's nothing poor about thatLiza is a young girl a teenager 18 years old who saves enough from her job in a factory to buy a new dress which she wears to a street party and has a jolly good time Her mother who is a bit of a hypochondriac and also a bit of a boozer thinks the money would have been better spent on booze for herself But Liza is happy and carefree and enjoys herself And her joy and love of life are infectious and spread to others But gradually things start going badly for Liza This partly because of her own choices and partly because of the pressures of other people and society generally To say any of the story would give away too much of the plot but I will say that it still today than a century after it was written gives an insight into the lives of poor people and the conditions in which they live It's an outsider's view As far as I know Somerset Maugham didn't grow up in poverty himself so he writes from observation not from first hand experience And it is pretty good observationBut books like this are probably not read by the poor They are probably read mostly by fairly comfortable middle class people like me And from what I have observed of the life of poor people though the time and the place may be different there is much that is similar To give just one example it's the people in the streets The book is about the inhabitants of one street and they meet each other and talk to each other in the street They sit on their doorsteps and talk to their neighbours Earlier this week I had a couple of hours to kill while my son wrote an exam so went to visit a friend who lived nearby Their gate was locked so I called them on my cell phone but there was no reply so I thought I might as well sit in the car in the street and read my book It was a lower middle class suburb The houses were not pretentious They were originally built by the Iskor steelworks nearby for housing their white workers and were later sold off But they had pleasant gardens and the street was uiet Only one car passed There was a tapping on the car window It was a rather agitated bird wondering what I was doing there I waved and it and it went away Two fat pigeons ambled across the street A dog barked In one of the houses nearby a baby cried briefly A young black woman in a hoodie came walking over the hill and passed me but there was no interaction between us Another black woman with hair extensions came walking up the hill and went into the house over the road But for the most part nothing happened And in our neighbourhood it is much the same But when we visit Mamelodi a previously disadvantaged township there are always people walking in the street talking to each other greeting neighbours There are children playing games hopscotch cricket as in Lambeth football etc On Sundays which is when we mostly go there a phrase from a poem I learnt at school comes to mind man's heart expands to tinker with his car There are cars with bonnets up cars being washed On some Sundays there's a Golf club rows of Volkswagen Golfs with their bonnets up with the owners hanging around discussing technical points The houses may be different the languaghe may be different the clothes may be different the time and the place may be different but Maugham's descriptions still ring true


  9. Mary Ronan Drew Mary Ronan Drew says:

    Liza of Lambeth this first novel by the young Somerset Maugham he was 23 when it was published in 1897 has its good points It's an introduction to Maugham's fiction a place from which to begin watching the honing of his novelistic skills It is a glimpse into working class life in London's East End slum Lambeth And the plot although a bit worn is worn because it worksIt's a story of a good girl gone wrong with plenty of blame to go around Liza is 18 lively laughing and popular with everyone in her neighborhood children and adults both The early scene where she plays cricket in the street with the young boys is charmingBut she is not firm in her decisions She dismisses her doting suitor Tom but then when she sees him going with her friends on an outing she wants so much to go that she gives in and says yes to his invitation This is a foreshadowing of a later and serious compromise after her initial rejection of another manI can't remember now where I got the idea that the book was a very long one But I did think so and I almost uit reading near the end of the novel thinking I was only a fifth of the way through This is one of the problems with reading on a Kindle something that is part of the collected works You have little idea where you are in a novel without poking around and doing a little arithmetic But I persevered and the end came uickly a bit too uickly as though Maugham got tired of the story and decided to end it all abruptlyThe novel is late Victorian and so everyone must get his or her just rewards which makes the ending predictable But the most serious problem with the book for me was the Cockney dialect which is heavy and difficult to read I understand the non rhotic R I practice it myself T pronounced F TH pronounced V the glottal stop double negatives and dropping the initial H Nonetheless it can be difficult to understand when listened to and frustrating to readSo how did a man like Somerset Maugham become so familiar with the language and lives of the people in Lambeth? He trained as a doctor and spent a good deal of time at St Thomas' Hospital which is in Lambeth And I do understand that Lambeth is not within the sound of Bow Bellls or even technically in the East End But it was close enough in the late 19th century when Maugham was treating and coming to know the people there with whom he had great sympathy


  10. Everett Darling Everett Darling says:

    Don't be surprised if it seems like less of a debut and of the working of an old hand since Maugham had been some years writing plays and short–stories while working through med school and as a licensed physician though none had been published As usual though his characters are flesh and blood tangible and totally honest Liza is a really down to earth protagonist remarkably sympathetic through all her foibles and follies and is dragged through the muck of life with crushing violence If the story seems matter of fact in its handling of some tragically emotive topics consider the effect of using such unrelenting candor as a tool to convey and provoke Would the story have the same effect with a daintier treatment of its subjects? I would suppose that it wouldn't provoke in such a way and that would be a loss if not for a political or social consideration then for personal development and knowledge through confronting unpleasant realities


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Liza of Lambeth

  1. Duane Duane says:

    This story is set in Lambeth a working class neighborhood in London around the end of the 19th century Liza Kemp is an 18 year old factory worker living with her sickly mother Liza is a very outgoing and likeable girl a favorite with the boys especially young Tom who is in love with her But trouble begins when Jim Blakeston moves into the neighborhood Jim is a 40 year old married man with children but he has an eye for Liza and when he starts showering her with affection she is powerless to resist Their relationship can only end badly and the story winds it's way to it's inevitable conclusion

  2. Alice (MTB/Alice Tied The Bookish Knot) Alice (MTB/Alice Tied The Bookish Knot) says:

    If you like classic books please subscribe to my classics book blog wwwalicereadsclassicswordpresscom I purchased this during my birthday holiday in Hay On Wye back in July and only decided to pick up and read this last night since the story length was just under 140 pages long Not hearing much about W Somerset Maugham before going into Liza of Lambeth I wasn't sure what to expect or how his writing style was going to be like as a first time reader But for a uick interesting read Liza of Lambeth did the trick My Vintage Classics edition of the book has an author's note at the very start before the actual novel talking about his writing process and how Liza of Lambeth was his first novel This I found extremely interesting since finding out about the history of past authors from the 18001900s appeals to me From this note he explains how this book is his first novel and his experiences living in London at the time of writing it Throughout the story setting it's clear to see that he portrayed a visual image of London's streets well just because he physically went out to research the surrounding areas The story follows eighteen year old Liza who is a very mischievous character and likes to run up and down the streets and attract the street guys that live close to her and her Mum In Vere Street Lambeth she is very well known by the locals and the area is very run down A guy called Tom who she has known for a while proposes to her but she declines A new guy called Jim arrives in the area with his family and soon falls head over heels in love with Liza but he is married setting up the story of an affair gone extremely wrong The way the characters spoke in the book using words like Mornin and Yer shows that W Somerset Maugham actually took time to listen to how people in London spoke and made the story realistic to me as a reader over 100 years on after it was first published The ending was a real surprise to me story length could have been a little bit longer since some of the scenes felt rushed but for a first novel it was uick visual and eye openingMy social mediasTwitter wwwTwittercomMarriedToBooks3Instagram wwwInstagramcomalicetiedthebookishBook Blog 1 wwwmarriedtobooksreviewsandblogword

  3. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    I liked this book so I am giving it three stars Please do not think a three star book is not worth reading Give it a chance; it takes a while to get pulled inOne can look at this book in two waysYou can look at the plot and see what happens There are three let’s say four central characters Liza Kemp is eighteen and lives in Lambeth a slum area in southern London The year is 1887 We follow what happens from August to December of that year She is vibrant she is bewitching she has zest and she loves to live and of course she is interested in men She has a beau—Tom but she is bored by him So guess what there turns up another His name is Jim Blakeston but he is married has five kids and is about twenty years her senior As you might guess she falls for him The fourth character is Liza’s mother Another interesting character is a midwife Mrs Hodges She lives upstairs in the same building as the Kemps I did not guess how the story would end but I did guess uite a bit along the way The plot line is just not all that uniue The second way of looking at the book is by observing the milieu the London slum area and its inhabitants that reside there It is this that I liked The author wrote Liza of Lambeth while he was a medical student interning at the obstetric unit of St Thomas’ Hospital in Lambeth There is the connection Maugham is writing about people and a milieu he knows It is for this reason that what is described is perceived as so very real We see life on the street the brawls the drinking and the dancing Domestic violence high mortality and lack of health care are the norm Gender roles are portrayed in a stereotypical fashion We are not delivered a fairy tale story or a didactic lesson What the characters do feel and say may not always be nice but is believable We are given a mirror image of reality I’ll take reality any day over fantasyI listened to an audiobook narrated by Annie Adlington The author’s characters speak a South London dialect Unusual slang words shortened words and idioms pepper the dialogs Adlington uses what sounds to me like a pronounced Cockney accent This reflects the author’s written words well but makes the lines even difficult to understand From the context one can usually grasp approximately what is meant Due to the dialect and depending upon one’s own capability and preference it might be better to choose the paper book I have given the narration three stars Clarity is important to meMy ratings of Maugham’s booksMrs Craddock 4 starsCakes and Ale 4 starsThe Painted Veil 4 starsLiza of Lambeth 3 starsThe Razor's Edge 3 starsChristmas Holiday 3 starsTheatre 2 starsThe Moon and Sixpence 2 starsOf Human Bondage 2 stars

  4. classic reverie classic reverie says:

    I am reading first novels from some of my favorite authors and Somerset Maugham was on my listHaving read Of Human Bondage this year it was fresh in my mind and I could not help compare Liza and Mildred Mildred was such a despicable character whereas Liza had a good heart but it sent her in the wrong direction Maugham's female characters are uite strong in mind The Londoner's dialect is manageable and I kept thinking of Eliza Doolittle from My Fair Lady as I read the story Maugham was accused of being overly influenced by novels like Arthur Morrison's Child of Jago which lead to critics accusing him of copying the slum atmosphere not having read Morrison yet I can not comment myself until I read Jago Maugham's slum has marriage troubles drunkenness abuse and starvation but it also has a spirit of enjoying life when one can so life is not all bleak and dreary When Liza comes into the neighborhood it brightened but her life soon changed and all around her after a chance encounter I did not read this edition by Delphi collection of his works An unforgettable tale really he did know how to make them memorable or at least they are for me

  5. Mikey B. Mikey B. says:

    This is Somerset Maugham’s first published story a short novel or novelette – and it shows The only real character is Liza the others are caricatures and not well rounded Liza is a rambunctious and lively teenage girl of eighteen – and that in itself is a departure from some of the stereotypes of woman portrayed in the literature of the eraThe story takes place in a lower class area of London and the scenes and settings are raw view spoiler for example the fight between the two women at the story’s end hide spoiler

  6. Sandhya Sandhya says:

    Liza Of Lambeth 1897 is perhaps Maugham's only novel which I don't have the heart to revisit Not because it is poor but because it is so chillingly tragic It isn't as if his other novels are all light and sunshine Maugham in fact always had a great eye for human tragedy and unfailingly took up themes about the impossibility of love and the doomed nature of marriages Almost every single novel of his has a grim death in it but nothing is as brutal as what one witnesses in Liza of Lambeth The graphic violence and the extreme misfortune of the lead character evoke a deep sense of horrorThe book was written by Maugham when he was all of 23 It was his first attempt at writing a novel and this he did while practising as a doctor His work took him to the doorsteps of the poor and needy in the slums of Lambeth and it is his experience and observations here that gave him the material for the book To his own surprise the novel was fairly well received when it was published and soon Maugham got offers to writeThe novel is Maugham’s shortest and also most unlike his other works Liza of Lambeth appears distinct because it is so removed from the world the author generally sets his stories in ie upper class London Here in a ghetto where the labour class resides the mood and tenor are vastly altered Also a large part of the book comprises of conversations in the local slang which makes it that much tougher to read Yet the story is engaging and in the end fans of the author will recogonise many things in the novel that only Maugham could have writtenthe rest

  7. Faye Faye says:

    Read July 2017Rating 45 starsW Somerset Maugham's first novel follows eighteen year old Liza a factory worker in the poor South London district of Lambeth The novel is written in the Cockney collouial dialect which makes it a little difficult to follow initially Maugham tackles a lot of social issues at once in this short tragic novel; the burden of bearing multiple children drunkenness domestic violence and infidelity to name a few Despite the hardship in the lives of Liza and the others there are some moments of happiness and humour which made the characters and the lives they're living realistic It is a very short book like a novella my copy is only 93 pages long and I think it is definitely worth a read for anyone interested in late Victorian fiction

  8. Stephen Hayes Stephen Hayes says:

    This is Somerset Maugham's first published novel and of those of his that I've read I think I like this one the best About 12 years ago I bought several of his books cheap at a library sale put them on a shelf and forgot them and in the course of tidying the shelves I took them down to read so I've been reading one after the other Liza of Lambeth is based on Maugham's experience as a medical student in a poor part of London Well it's poor in parts I once went to a garden party at Lambeth Palace the London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury and there's nothing poor about thatLiza is a young girl a teenager 18 years old who saves enough from her job in a factory to buy a new dress which she wears to a street party and has a jolly good time Her mother who is a bit of a hypochondriac and also a bit of a boozer thinks the money would have been better spent on booze for herself But Liza is happy and carefree and enjoys herself And her joy and love of life are infectious and spread to others But gradually things start going badly for Liza This partly because of her own choices and partly because of the pressures of other people and society generally To say any of the story would give away too much of the plot but I will say that it still today than a century after it was written gives an insight into the lives of poor people and the conditions in which they live It's an outsider's view As far as I know Somerset Maugham didn't grow up in poverty himself so he writes from observation not from first hand experience And it is pretty good observationBut books like this are probably not read by the poor They are probably read mostly by fairly comfortable middle class people like me And from what I have observed of the life of poor people though the time and the place may be different there is much that is similar To give just one example it's the people in the streets The book is about the inhabitants of one street and they meet each other and talk to each other in the street They sit on their doorsteps and talk to their neighbours Earlier this week I had a couple of hours to kill while my son wrote an exam so went to visit a friend who lived nearby Their gate was locked so I called them on my cell phone but there was no reply so I thought I might as well sit in the car in the street and read my book It was a lower middle class suburb The houses were not pretentious They were originally built by the Iskor steelworks nearby for housing their white workers and were later sold off But they had pleasant gardens and the street was uiet Only one car passed There was a tapping on the car window It was a rather agitated bird wondering what I was doing there I waved and it and it went away Two fat pigeons ambled across the street A dog barked In one of the houses nearby a baby cried briefly A young black woman in a hoodie came walking over the hill and passed me but there was no interaction between us Another black woman with hair extensions came walking up the hill and went into the house over the road But for the most part nothing happened And in our neighbourhood it is much the same But when we visit Mamelodi a previously disadvantaged township there are always people walking in the street talking to each other greeting neighbours There are children playing games hopscotch cricket as in Lambeth football etc On Sundays which is when we mostly go there a phrase from a poem I learnt at school comes to mind man's heart expands to tinker with his car There are cars with bonnets up cars being washed On some Sundays there's a Golf club rows of Volkswagen Golfs with their bonnets up with the owners hanging around discussing technical points The houses may be different the languaghe may be different the clothes may be different the time and the place may be different but Maugham's descriptions still ring true

  9. Mary Ronan Drew Mary Ronan Drew says:

    Liza of Lambeth this first novel by the young Somerset Maugham he was 23 when it was published in 1897 has its good points It's an introduction to Maugham's fiction a place from which to begin watching the honing of his novelistic skills It is a glimpse into working class life in London's East End slum Lambeth And the plot although a bit worn is worn because it worksIt's a story of a good girl gone wrong with plenty of blame to go around Liza is 18 lively laughing and popular with everyone in her neighborhood children and adults both The early scene where she plays cricket in the street with the young boys is charmingBut she is not firm in her decisions She dismisses her doting suitor Tom but then when she sees him going with her friends on an outing she wants so much to go that she gives in and says yes to his invitation This is a foreshadowing of a later and serious compromise after her initial rejection of another manI can't remember now where I got the idea that the book was a very long one But I did think so and I almost uit reading near the end of the novel thinking I was only a fifth of the way through This is one of the problems with reading on a Kindle something that is part of the collected works You have little idea where you are in a novel without poking around and doing a little arithmetic But I persevered and the end came uickly a bit too uickly as though Maugham got tired of the story and decided to end it all abruptlyThe novel is late Victorian and so everyone must get his or her just rewards which makes the ending predictable But the most serious problem with the book for me was the Cockney dialect which is heavy and difficult to read I understand the non rhotic R I practice it myself T pronounced F TH pronounced V the glottal stop double negatives and dropping the initial H Nonetheless it can be difficult to understand when listened to and frustrating to readSo how did a man like Somerset Maugham become so familiar with the language and lives of the people in Lambeth? He trained as a doctor and spent a good deal of time at St Thomas' Hospital which is in Lambeth And I do understand that Lambeth is not within the sound of Bow Bellls or even technically in the East End But it was close enough in the late 19th century when Maugham was treating and coming to know the people there with whom he had great sympathy

  10. Everett Darling Everett Darling says:

    Don't be surprised if it seems like less of a debut and of the working of an old hand since Maugham had been some years writing plays and short–stories while working through med school and as a licensed physician though none had been published As usual though his characters are flesh and blood tangible and totally honest Liza is a really down to earth protagonist remarkably sympathetic through all her foibles and follies and is dragged through the muck of life with crushing violence If the story seems matter of fact in its handling of some tragically emotive topics consider the effect of using such unrelenting candor as a tool to convey and provoke Would the story have the same effect with a daintier treatment of its subjects? I would suppose that it wouldn't provoke in such a way and that would be a loss if not for a political or social consideration then for personal development and knowledge through confronting unpleasant realities

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *