Paperback ï Quatrefoil PDF/EPUB Þ

Paperback ï Quatrefoil PDF/EPUB Þ


Quatrefoil ➽ [Reading] ➿ Quatrefoil By James Barr ➲ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The year is 1946 A brash young naval officer faces court martial for standing up to a lazy officer in the closing days of World War II In the midst of this turmoil he meets the man who will change his The year is A brash young naval officer faces court martial for standing up to a lazy officer in the closing days of World War II In the midst of this turmoil he meets the man who will change his life When it was first published in 'uatrefoil' marked a milestone in gay writing Now four decades later this book remains a magnificent love story and a tribute to the human spirit In a new epilogue the author reveals for the first time the story behind his ground breaking novel.


10 thoughts on “Quatrefoil

  1. Erastes Erastes says:

    Written in 1950 and set in 1946 I didn’t really have any doubt as to how the story would end It was rare to find a book written in this time which had a happy ending so if that’s all you want from a book this isn’t for youIt’s one of those books that you really should be reading if you want to write in this genre not because it’s a work of genius but because it shines a light on times and a mind set that no longer exists in our Western worldIt’s very much a coming of age story Despite being 23 Phillip Froelich pronounced Froylich comes over as young for his age At the beginning of the book he’s seen leaving his ship under a cloud and heading to Naval Headuarters to face a General Court Martial for striking a superior officer–namely his captain If ever there was a protagonist likely to alienate the reader it’s Phillip for at least half of this book He’s just horrible A terrible snog a real prig prickly rude to just about everyone and thinks he’s better than just about everyone As the blurb explains he considers himself to be a MAN fully masculine and he has a loathing of “nancies” He made a close friend on board his ship but repulsed him violently when he made a pass at him He knows that men of that persuasion are attracted to him but he blames them he sees nothing in himself that he can blame for thisSo when he meets Tim Danelaw rich urbane seemingly easy in his own skin and giving off than mere signals that he’s interested in Phillip Phillip is thrown because some deeply buried part of him is responding The rest of the story is the journey that Phillip takes mentored patiently by Tim to accept himself for what he isIt is a dated book–I can’t see any men of today having the kind of philosophical conversations about homosexuality that these two men have and it’s not a particularly easy read as some of the concepts were a little beyond me But it is interesting to see–in a world where the homosexual community had yet to become in any way cohesive–how some men viewed homosexuality even when it surfaced in themselves I found it disturbing that even Tim–the rational and knowledgeable of the two–considered anything but a ‘intelligent’ meeting of minds and bodies would be depraved and base Whether that was the opinion of Barr I don’t know I have to wonder what he’d think of some of the community these daysThe characterisation is masterful I’ve already said that Phillip is absolutely loathsome at the beginning–and indeed for much of–of the book That he does mellow and begin to look around him and to realise that there is available for himself than he had plans for He thinks he’s tremendously ambitious but his house in that respect is actually based on sand and it takes Tim to point this outThe way Tim guides and moulds Phillip is beautifully done too He is truly an Erastes to Phillip’s Eromenos He somehow understands Phillip’s mind perfectly or almost so and knows when to push and when to let the young man find his own way It is through Tim’s eyes that we see Phillip in his home environment–and discover many of the reasons why he is the way he is at the beginning of the bookAs well as the slow and tender growing relationship between the two which takes the entire book there are a good handful of other subplots all fuelled by characters as three dimensional as the main protagonists I won’t go into them because it would far too spoileryAlthough I found it a little hard to get involved with–purely because of my dislike of Phillip–by the middle of the book I was entirely hooked and couldn’t bear to get to the end because I had a pretty shrewd idea of how it was going to go and I was heartbroken to find I was right That being said there’s a fair pinch of hope at the end too so it’s not all gloom and doomIf you can get hold of a copy at a reasonable price–try Abe Books or the Book Depository–then do grab it because it’s a really lovely long plotty and literary read and if that’s your bag you’ll hoover it up


  2. anna (½ of readsrainbow) anna (½ of readsrainbow) says:

    this is a book by a gay cowboy okay rancher so sue me for not knowing the difference of fucking course i want to read it


  3. Nicolas Chinardet Nicolas Chinardet says:

    uatrefoil is a coming out story with a difference Although Phillip Froelich the protagonist is regularly called boy and looks like an ephebe he is supposed to be the incarnation of Donatello's St George he is already 23 when the story takes place He is also far from a lovable man In fact through out the book he is execrable and various characters don't hesitate to dress him with various unflattering epithets He does come across a lot of the time as a spoilt brat though he finally and thankfully mellows out under the influence of Tim Danelaw In fact the first half at least proves a little emotionally tiring to read almost all interactions we witness are somehow confrontational; Phillip hating people on sight being rude to them or getting angry for no reason It is indeed difficult if not impossible to find the beauty Tim sees in Phillip's mindDespite this however uatrefoil manages to be an intriguing story that keeps the reader guessing as to where it is going though it is with hindsight predicable This is perhaps due to the fact that it was written in the late 40s where different rules of engagement prevailed for literary creation particularly on the subject matter of homosexualityIn many respect the book is a product of its age The internalise homophobia the familiar cod psychology to apologies for and justify same sex feelings are there though subtle than in most books of that time Also present is the extolation of the intellectual and moral superiority of gay men Barr recognisably harks back to hellenistic mythology which explicitly serves as model for his story older experienced man takes beautiful youth under his wing and protection not for sexual gratification but to help form and mould his mind The Sacred Band of Thebes even gets a name check were we in any doubtBut somehow uatrefoil seems to transcend its age at least to some extent The writing is confident and elegant and even the longish philosophical discussions between the characters which could easily become clumsily veiled sermons to reader although sometimes rather opaue retain a truthful element to them This was a very pleasant discovery for me and I've order copies of Barr's other two books to continue exploring his literary universe Get a copy if you can find one


  4. Andrew Andrew says:

    This book is AMAZING There really isn't too much else to say except that if you haven't read this book you should The love story is crafted perfectly and the main character Phillip Froelich is the perfect anti hero He has so many ualities of the young guy struggling with who he is and the eventual discovery of that truth only to be thrust again into acceptance without the catalystThis book is in my top five books of all time It takes place at the close of WWII in Seattle and San Francisco as well as Oklahoma THe characters are very real and it is over all a huge piece of gay Americana Pre don't ask don't tell pre acceptance the struggles in this book have a much higher conseuence rate James Barr is a tremendous novelist Some would think taht he had his one literary hit but if you are able to find another of his books ie THE OCCASIONAL MAN you will not be disappointed It is a true lesson in our past to have this man's work written in a time before it would be accepted and surviving for those of us today to enjoy


  5. David Avery David Avery says:

    UATREFOIL is a beautifully written and important mid 20th century novel that should be better known than it is It tells the story of Phillip Froelich the scion of a wealthy Oklahoma family and Tim Danelaw the scion of a wealthy Milwaukee family with a vast brewery fortune It begins with a 23 year old Phillip about to be court martialed from the US Navy in 1946 At his darkest hour he meets the handsome and mysterious Commander Danelaw who uses his connections in the Navy and his vast wealth to guide and protect Phillip when he most needs help Tim is 10 years older and had longer to come to terms with who he is and the familiar older younger vibe of the story was appealing to me and believableThe book jacket sums up the plot so I won’t do that here I will say the elouent use of language and rich vocabulary pulled me right in and I was sorry when the novel ended The WWII era and its aftermath were impactful in the opportunities they presented for gay men and women to continue the slow but steady march towards broader acceptance in law and society – a march that has taken decades and still continues I understand that UATREFOIL which was published in 1950 is the first or one of the first books to show gay men and their love for each other in a positive light That historical perspective alone makes UATREFOIL worthy of readingIt is saddening to think of the challenges both Phillip and Tim faced and the internal conflicts and conversations with oneself that each had to have Gay sex was illegal then and the threat of punishment and fear of blackmail made me uncomfortable enough to skip ahead to find out what happened because I didn’t think I could bear to continue if the guys were to hate or kill themselves I also found the treatment of women rather disturbing to read since there seemed to be little sympathy or regard for women unwittingly tricked into marrying men who could never fully love themThe book isn’t perfect but probably could have been with a different editor Structurally I think the tension of the impending court martial could have been used to better effect in terms of driving the plot Additionally as rich as the language is I think some passages and conversations between Phillip and Tim continued longer than they should have and bogged the story down With tighter editing those could have been fixed and UATREFOIL would edge over the line to greatness That said I loved the book overall and would put it on the shelf next to THE CITY AND THE PILLAR GIOVANNI’S ROOM and A BOY’S OWN STORY in terms of its importance to gay themed literature particularly of its time 5 stars


  6. Chris Chris says:

    Superb Review coming


  7. Kel Kel says:

    why does someone always have to die tragically at least no one killed themselves


  8. Emma Emma says:

    The good suspenseful plotty an interesting historical note to a time when people could live like lords in towns of 50000 people in dry state Oklahoma A madly competent erastes type mentor is pretty much a hero out of thin air but also a little Heathcliff like There is a hilarious fiancee in hereThe less good a bit didactic some breathy descriptions of people esp the protagonist who is portrayed as some sort of savage cat god I feel like 90% of the novel except for at the very end for the protagonist was very hm there is this guy around who is helping me out with a very hot wife I guess for him I can take it or leave it Emotional pull from the relationship is there but not too hard hitting


  9. David David says:

    One of the best books I have ever read and one of the best books in gay literature that I have readThis book needs to be better known because it is truly a work of art It is well ahead of its time and just shocking to know this was written in the 50's when it would have been a tremendously controversial book Today it is no than a love story and a wonderful one that hits you in the heart It is a very accessible book while being written in beautiful prose akin to the time Read it and spread the word


  10. Robert Fucci Robert Fucci says:

    I found this to be one of the most intelligent compelling reads of any Gay novel I have read so far


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10 thoughts on “Quatrefoil

  1. Erastes Erastes says:

    Written in 1950 and set in 1946 I didn’t really have any doubt as to how the story would end It was rare to find a book written in this time which had a happy ending so if that’s all you want from a book this isn’t for youIt’s one of those books that you really should be reading if you want to write in this genre not because it’s a work of genius but because it shines a light on times and a mind set that no longer exists in our Western worldIt’s very much a coming of age story Despite being 23 Phillip Froelich pronounced Froylich comes over as young for his age At the beginning of the book he’s seen leaving his ship under a cloud and heading to Naval Headuarters to face a General Court Martial for striking a superior officer–namely his captain If ever there was a protagonist likely to alienate the reader it’s Phillip for at least half of this book He’s just horrible A terrible snog a real prig prickly rude to just about everyone and thinks he’s better than just about everyone As the blurb explains he considers himself to be a MAN fully masculine and he has a loathing of “nancies” He made a close friend on board his ship but repulsed him violently when he made a pass at him He knows that men of that persuasion are attracted to him but he blames them he sees nothing in himself that he can blame for thisSo when he meets Tim Danelaw rich urbane seemingly easy in his own skin and giving off than mere signals that he’s interested in Phillip Phillip is thrown because some deeply buried part of him is responding The rest of the story is the journey that Phillip takes mentored patiently by Tim to accept himself for what he isIt is a dated book–I can’t see any men of today having the kind of philosophical conversations about homosexuality that these two men have and it’s not a particularly easy read as some of the concepts were a little beyond me But it is interesting to see–in a world where the homosexual community had yet to become in any way cohesive–how some men viewed homosexuality even when it surfaced in themselves I found it disturbing that even Tim–the rational and knowledgeable of the two–considered anything but a ‘intelligent’ meeting of minds and bodies would be depraved and base Whether that was the opinion of Barr I don’t know I have to wonder what he’d think of some of the community these daysThe characterisation is masterful I’ve already said that Phillip is absolutely loathsome at the beginning–and indeed for much of–of the book That he does mellow and begin to look around him and to realise that there is available for himself than he had plans for He thinks he’s tremendously ambitious but his house in that respect is actually based on sand and it takes Tim to point this outThe way Tim guides and moulds Phillip is beautifully done too He is truly an Erastes to Phillip’s Eromenos He somehow understands Phillip’s mind perfectly or almost so and knows when to push and when to let the young man find his own way It is through Tim’s eyes that we see Phillip in his home environment–and discover many of the reasons why he is the way he is at the beginning of the bookAs well as the slow and tender growing relationship between the two which takes the entire book there are a good handful of other subplots all fuelled by characters as three dimensional as the main protagonists I won’t go into them because it would far too spoileryAlthough I found it a little hard to get involved with–purely because of my dislike of Phillip–by the middle of the book I was entirely hooked and couldn’t bear to get to the end because I had a pretty shrewd idea of how it was going to go and I was heartbroken to find I was right That being said there’s a fair pinch of hope at the end too so it’s not all gloom and doomIf you can get hold of a copy at a reasonable price–try Abe Books or the Book Depository–then do grab it because it’s a really lovely long plotty and literary read and if that’s your bag you’ll hoover it up

  2. anna (½ of readsrainbow) anna (½ of readsrainbow) says:

    this is a book by a gay cowboy okay rancher so sue me for not knowing the difference of fucking course i want to read it

  3. Nicolas Chinardet Nicolas Chinardet says:

    uatrefoil is a coming out story with a difference Although Phillip Froelich the protagonist is regularly called boy and looks like an ephebe he is supposed to be the incarnation of Donatello's St George he is already 23 when the story takes place He is also far from a lovable man In fact through out the book he is execrable and various characters don't hesitate to dress him with various unflattering epithets He does come across a lot of the time as a spoilt brat though he finally and thankfully mellows out under the influence of Tim Danelaw In fact the first half at least proves a little emotionally tiring to read almost all interactions we witness are somehow confrontational; Phillip hating people on sight being rude to them or getting angry for no reason It is indeed difficult if not impossible to find the beauty Tim sees in Phillip's mindDespite this however uatrefoil manages to be an intriguing story that keeps the reader guessing as to where it is going though it is with hindsight predicable This is perhaps due to the fact that it was written in the late 40s where different rules of engagement prevailed for literary creation particularly on the subject matter of homosexualityIn many respect the book is a product of its age The internalise homophobia the familiar cod psychology to apologies for and justify same sex feelings are there though subtle than in most books of that time Also present is the extolation of the intellectual and moral superiority of gay men Barr recognisably harks back to hellenistic mythology which explicitly serves as model for his story older experienced man takes beautiful youth under his wing and protection not for sexual gratification but to help form and mould his mind The Sacred Band of Thebes even gets a name check were we in any doubtBut somehow uatrefoil seems to transcend its age at least to some extent The writing is confident and elegant and even the longish philosophical discussions between the characters which could easily become clumsily veiled sermons to reader although sometimes rather opaue retain a truthful element to them This was a very pleasant discovery for me and I've order copies of Barr's other two books to continue exploring his literary universe Get a copy if you can find one

  4. Andrew Andrew says:

    This book is AMAZING There really isn't too much else to say except that if you haven't read this book you should The love story is crafted perfectly and the main character Phillip Froelich is the perfect anti hero He has so many ualities of the young guy struggling with who he is and the eventual discovery of that truth only to be thrust again into acceptance without the catalystThis book is in my top five books of all time It takes place at the close of WWII in Seattle and San Francisco as well as Oklahoma THe characters are very real and it is over all a huge piece of gay Americana Pre don't ask don't tell pre acceptance the struggles in this book have a much higher conseuence rate James Barr is a tremendous novelist Some would think taht he had his one literary hit but if you are able to find another of his books ie THE OCCASIONAL MAN you will not be disappointed It is a true lesson in our past to have this man's work written in a time before it would be accepted and surviving for those of us today to enjoy

  5. David Avery David Avery says:

    UATREFOIL is a beautifully written and important mid 20th century novel that should be better known than it is It tells the story of Phillip Froelich the scion of a wealthy Oklahoma family and Tim Danelaw the scion of a wealthy Milwaukee family with a vast brewery fortune It begins with a 23 year old Phillip about to be court martialed from the US Navy in 1946 At his darkest hour he meets the handsome and mysterious Commander Danelaw who uses his connections in the Navy and his vast wealth to guide and protect Phillip when he most needs help Tim is 10 years older and had longer to come to terms with who he is and the familiar older younger vibe of the story was appealing to me and believableThe book jacket sums up the plot so I won’t do that here I will say the elouent use of language and rich vocabulary pulled me right in and I was sorry when the novel ended The WWII era and its aftermath were impactful in the opportunities they presented for gay men and women to continue the slow but steady march towards broader acceptance in law and society – a march that has taken decades and still continues I understand that UATREFOIL which was published in 1950 is the first or one of the first books to show gay men and their love for each other in a positive light That historical perspective alone makes UATREFOIL worthy of readingIt is saddening to think of the challenges both Phillip and Tim faced and the internal conflicts and conversations with oneself that each had to have Gay sex was illegal then and the threat of punishment and fear of blackmail made me uncomfortable enough to skip ahead to find out what happened because I didn’t think I could bear to continue if the guys were to hate or kill themselves I also found the treatment of women rather disturbing to read since there seemed to be little sympathy or regard for women unwittingly tricked into marrying men who could never fully love themThe book isn’t perfect but probably could have been with a different editor Structurally I think the tension of the impending court martial could have been used to better effect in terms of driving the plot Additionally as rich as the language is I think some passages and conversations between Phillip and Tim continued longer than they should have and bogged the story down With tighter editing those could have been fixed and UATREFOIL would edge over the line to greatness That said I loved the book overall and would put it on the shelf next to THE CITY AND THE PILLAR GIOVANNI’S ROOM and A BOY’S OWN STORY in terms of its importance to gay themed literature particularly of its time 5 stars

  6. Chris Chris says:

    Superb Review coming

  7. Kel Kel says:

    why does someone always have to die tragically at least no one killed themselves

  8. Emma Emma says:

    The good suspenseful plotty an interesting historical note to a time when people could live like lords in towns of 50000 people in dry state Oklahoma A madly competent erastes type mentor is pretty much a hero out of thin air but also a little Heathcliff like There is a hilarious fiancee in hereThe less good a bit didactic some breathy descriptions of people esp the protagonist who is portrayed as some sort of savage cat god I feel like 90% of the novel except for at the very end for the protagonist was very hm there is this guy around who is helping me out with a very hot wife I guess for him I can take it or leave it Emotional pull from the relationship is there but not too hard hitting

  9. David David says:

    One of the best books I have ever read and one of the best books in gay literature that I have readThis book needs to be better known because it is truly a work of art It is well ahead of its time and just shocking to know this was written in the 50's when it would have been a tremendously controversial book Today it is no than a love story and a wonderful one that hits you in the heart It is a very accessible book while being written in beautiful prose akin to the time Read it and spread the word

  10. Robert Fucci Robert Fucci says:

    I found this to be one of the most intelligent compelling reads of any Gay novel I have read so far

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