An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude Kindle

An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude Kindle

An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude ✽ [EPUB] ✵ An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude By Ann Vanderhoof ❧ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk An Embarrassment of Mangoes is a delicious chronicle of leaving the type A lifestyle behind and discovering the seductive secrets of life in the CaribbeanWho hasn’t fantasized about chucking the job An Embarrassment of Mangoes is a of Mangoes PDF/EPUB é delicious chronicle of leaving the type A lifestyle behind and discovering the seductive secrets of life in the CaribbeanWho hasn’t fantasized about chucking the job saying goodbye to the rat race and An Embarrassment PDF/EPUB or escaping to some exotic destination in search of sun sand and a different way of life Canadians Ann Vanderhoof and her husband Steve did just thatIn the mid s they were driven forty something professionals who were desperate for Embarrassment of Mangoes PDF/EPUB ê a break from their deadline dominated career defined lives So they uit their jobs rented out their house moved onto a foot sailboat called Receta “recipe” in Spanish and set sail for the Caribbean on a two year Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Kindle - voyage of culinary and cultural discoveryIn lavish detail that will have you packing your swimsuit and dashing for the airport Vanderhoof describes the sun drenched landscapes enchanting characters and mouthwatering tastes that season their new lifestyle Come along for the ride and be seduced by Caribbean rhythms as she and Steve sip rum with their island neighbors hike lush rain forests pull their supper out of the sea and adapt to life on “island time”Exchanging business clothes for bare feet they drop anchor in countries individual islands where they explore secluded beaches and shop lively local markets Along the way Ann records the delectable dishes they encounter from cracked conch in the Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Kindle - Bahamas to curried lobster in Grenada from Dominican papaya salsa to classic West Indian rum punch and incorporates these enticing recipes into the text so that readers can participate in the adventureAlmost as good as making the journey itself.


10 thoughts on “An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude

  1. Kristina Kristina says:

    I almost cried when I finished this book There is such a sense of peace and contentment with life that is exuded from the pages of this book It's not high literature it doesn't contain fancy prose; it is just one damn fine book to read for the pure pleasure of reading It is the book that is embodies what it means to lose oneself in a book For myself I know that as much as I would love to I will probably never take two years off from my life and career and sail around the Caribbean But does that mean I will never know what it feels like? Not necessarily All I need to do is pick up An Embarrassment of Mangoes Even without closing my eyes I heard the crackling lightning and deafening thunder of the sualls; I can smell the lush green foliage moist dirt sweaty bodies and sweet and sharp spices; I can taste the juicy mangoes the fresh fish and the rum rum rum I was constantly smiling reading this book I was so perfectly content to immerse myself in a book where carpe diem and being zen were the main themes along with going with the flow as much as I hate that phrase and adjusting to island time when jus' now means in three hours The good naturedness of the other cruisers and especially the islanders was a wonderful tonic to the rude or otherwise unfriendly interactions to which I have resigned myself in this NYC metro area life Why does it have to be such a shock when people are nice? Or friendly? Or generous? And all without you being so or doing so first? It's astonishing Maybe it has to do with the climate Warmth and sunshine always do me a world of good slogging through seasonal depression in the winter is the worst Maybe it's the food with the abundance and variety of fruits vegetables fish spices and seafood available Sure Whole Foods might stock breadfruit do they even? the author said that they have to be harvested at just the right time so maybe exporting them is inconvenient but I wouldn't pay 20 for something that is guaranteed to taste half as good as it would be on the islands Maybe it's simply the nature of the people with their traditions of singing and dancing and feasting And Carnival Whatever it is it's too bad that isn't found around the worldThe saving grace to finishing this book as if anything could be a balm for that kind of heartwrenching bitter end was trying some of the recipes Food is nothing if not a balm to heal wounds and soothe souls I made the papaya salsa from page 101 but I used mangoes instead I also chopped the red onion much finer rather than leaving it in half rings It was superb On an icky rainy chilly and windy evening I sat down to a meal of fresh hot fish off the stove and a cool and refreshing mango salsa Undoubtedly my mangoes were mere shadowy imitations of those the author herself was able to enjoy but it brought the islands that little bit closer As the author and any seasoned traveler will attest to the best way to experience a culture is through its food The combination of food and adventures sometimes one and the same in this book make it a masterful escape from the ordinary realities through which we slog every day; but I also think that the same principles of carpe diem and contentment and enjoyment are universal and I know I would be well served by trying to find a bit of jus' now and mango salsa in my life


  2. Numidica Numidica says:

    This book appeals to me because Ann and Steve have done what I intend to do in a couple of years sail from the North American mainland south through the Bahamas to the Dominican Republic Puerto Rico the Virgin Islands and on down to the real goal the Lesser Antilles islands Ann's account of their trip from Toronto to Trinidad is replete with good sailor's stories but it is not so long on sailing detail to be off putting to non sailors Ann waxes elouent about her beloved Grenada and I get it having spent time on Nevis Saba and Montserrat as well as the Bahamas out islands; the places farthest from the cruise ship itineraries are still in many ways the old Caribbean where people are friendly and not jaded by dealing with the thousandth American tourist whining that things are not the same as at home Such places are rarer and rarer and I hope to visit Grenada in December so if COVID doesn't wreck my plan I'll see how much it has changed since Ann and Steve first made landfall in 1998 Ann is an expert chef and food writer and since my tastes in food incline toward the simplest possible meals I skipped over some of the purely food related parts I'm embarrassed to say that I have never fired up the oven on my boat though it does make a great supplemental storage locker My idea of haute cuisine in an underway meal is boiling water on the galley stovetop to put in a dehydrated pasta primavera back packing meal so most of Ann's cooking ideas are wasted on meWhere I find common ground with her and a lot of it is regarding the joys of being in touch with nature at sea or in the coves and bays or a remote island Doing a night passage during which small fish jump aboard your boat never fails to make me smile this has happened to me every time I've crossed the Gulf Stream Dolphins crossing and re crossing the bow and following you for half an hour is a magical thing and Ann describes such sea faring lore with the kind of wonder it deserves Her description of the people of the Windward Islands is likewise on target at least in my experience This off the beaten path Caribbean is so different from the places most Americans see when getting off a cruise ship that it's hard to explain to the Carnival Cruise guests what they are missing and in reality I'm happy for them not to go to these few remaining happy and hard to get to places that are not yet selling gold chains and Rolexes by the cruise ship dock This was a uick read and worth the time I spent on it It made me wish for a world without COVID so I can travel again and sail south; many of the Caribbean islands are still closed including the one I most want to go back to 2021 cannot come too soon


  3. Austin Collins Austin Collins says:

    There are sailing books about sailing and then there are sailing books about people and places This is a sailing book about people places and cooking – lots of cookingIf you love food and travel you will enjoy the heck out of this story for that alone even if you couldn't give two hoots about boats And if you love food travel rum and the freedom of the open sea you will love An Embarrassment of MangoesUnlike sailing books that spin terrifying tales of storms and fatigue and jagged rocks and freezing cold and staying just one half step ahead of death and calamity this one weaves a pleasant and engaging story about a couple who take some time off from their careers to cruise the warm clear waters of the Caribbean Ann and Steve are mostly regular normal folks doing something a lot of people dream about They aren't trying to break world records or challenge King Neptune they just wanted to get away for a little while and do it on their own terms Did I mention that there is cooking? An Embarrassment of Mangoes follows their experiences as they sail from Toronto to Trinidad just off the coast of Venezuela and back again on board their 42 foot Tartan sloop Receta Spanish for recipe many of which you will find interspersed with the text and their dinghy Snack Ann begins the story admittedly unsure of the whole deal but soon finds herself an enthusiastic convert to the life of an oceanic vagabondMany sailing stories are written by people who are sailors first and also just happen to be functionally capable of assembling sentences in a way that normally doesn't violate the most important rules of grammar usage and style too egregiously Ann Vanderhoof is an entirely different kind of sailing author she was a magazine editor before she ever embarked on this trip Her voice is confident and competent; her prose is strong and vivid An Embarrassment of Mangoes is a fine investment of your time whether you are secretly dreaming of sailing away someday or content to enjoy the salty wanderings of others from the comfort of your living room reading chair


  4. Prachi Pati Prachi Pati says:

    My Rating 4 awesome starsBook Name An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean InterludeAuthor Ann VanderhoofGenre Non FictionTravelogueCultureHistoryCaribbean food recipe guideBefore I start my review here is some trivia Did you know because I didn't before I read this book Receta means recipe in Spanish?Conch is a popular seafood in the Bahamas?Luperon is called a 'Hurricane Hole'?Gugua are not a strange species of insect but actually what the public minivans are called? LolLambi is not lamb but the Creole word for Conch?Fig is not Fig but actually a Banana in the Caribbean who knewAnd many many such little facts if you've found this interesting I would say you don't even have to read the rest of the review just read the book hahahOk so as part of the 2017 book club reading challenge we have a traveltourist challenge where the moderator will select a placeregion for each month as the topic and we have to select a book that is either set in that placelocation or whose author is from that location and read and review it for that month So for January the location was Caribbean islands and after a lot of skimming over the internet on various options I chose to read this book just because the description and the author seemed very real to me and what better way to travel if not really traveling than by reading a good travelogue? ;I don't read a lot of non fiction to be frank so I wasn't sure how to rate this book But I figured I did find the book interesting and amusing and I also did learn a whole lot of things so this definitely ualifies for a 4 and above ratingThe book is written by Ann Vanderhoof about how she and her partner Steve decided and planned to take a 2 year break from their daily 9 9 jobs in Canada and go sailing in their own sailing boat across the Caribbean islands It talks about her fears her anxiety in the beginning since she has never sailed that long before in open ocean her amazement and pure joys of trying out all the local fruits vegetables and seafood that they catch fresh out of the water her loving interactions with the locals her huge list of recipes that I really want to try but can't because I don't have most of those ingredients or cooking tools available with me yet her test of strength and grit during the storm nights manning the sailboat her joys of finding delight in the nature and in minimalism and her disappointment when the journey is overI've never sailed nor have I visited any of the Caribbean islands but reading this book I felt like I was on a virtual tour there and now I've added a visit to the Caribbean at least to one of the islands to my list of travel destinations nowlol DSo I'd recommend this book if you like reading travelogues that are real filled with real stories humor and lots of facts on sailing fishing history culture and my favorite touch to the book the recipes at the end of each chapter


  5. Missy J Missy J says:

    Happy 2018 everybodyActually finished this book a couple of days ago but haven't gotten a chance to write a review yet I wanted to start 2018 with a light breezy and fun book which has been on my to read shelf for uite some timeAn Embarrassment of Mangoes was the perfect book for me It is a mix of traveling sailing and cooking Ann and Steve are two Canadian professionals who decided to leave their work for two years and sail through the Caribbean a dream But there's reality too Ann and Steve prepared themselves for 5 years to save up money pay the mortgage of their house which they will rent out to have a monthly income during their travelsI'm not really into sailing and some of the technical aspects of sailing in this book made it sound very complicated But I did appreciate to read about this different life and their adjustment It wasn't always smooth sailing Most of the time they spent studying the weather and if they go to buy groceries it takes a full day to do just that Also you can't just go from one island to another There needs to be preparation and communication What I loved was Ann and Steve's love for local food and customs They especially left an imprint in Grenada closely befriending a local family After each chapter we get one to three recipes They all sounded amazing unfortunately I cannot find a fresh lobster where I live to try the recipe out But the recipes were really lovelyI appreciate reading the adventure of Ann and Steve They are wonderful positive passionate and hardworking people I highly recommend this book


  6. Jessica Haider Jessica Haider says:

    As the book blurb states An Embarassment of Mangoes is remniscent of Under the Tuscan Sun in that it is a travel memoir about a women who steps away from her real life of working her job and the dealing with other everyday stresses The author and her husband take 2 years off from their work and set sail from Toronto to the Caribbean The book really made me want to do the sameespecially now when I am bogged down with deadlines and too much work at the office I NEED A VACATIONThe author did a great job of recounting their experiences sailing and describing the character charms and food of each island they visited The end of each chapter had several recipes of food that she made on that leg of the journey


  7. A A says:

    I really enjoyed An Embarrassment of Mangoes but it didn't uite rise to the standards of 4 stars It was a solid 35 and a couple of chapters made it to 5 stars but it was just a bit too inconsistent to make the 4 star rank The basic premise is that this couple from Toronto take the plunge uit their jobs and head off for a two year adventure down the coast of the US through the Caribbean to Trinidad before returning to Canada I applaud the hutzzpah that it took to uit their jobs and rent out their house while they were still young enough to enjoy their trip Would that my spouse would agree and I would be on the pathBut the relating of the story while entertaining just wasn't captivating The author was a magazine editor but it is clear that while she is a talented author she isn't in the same category as Bill Bryson Tony Horowitz or William Least Heat Moon The stories about the trip were educational and full of lots of interesting details but didn't leave you laughing crying cringing or scarred The book is just a very well documented travelogue as if you were reading the diary of a decent author If you love sailing or the Caribbean then you should read the bookBut be prepared for most of the book to take place in four locations with little fillers to explain the rest of the trip I think the author must have spent at least 14 of her trip anchored in Grenada Still great gusto just to do it and take the trip and for that I applaud her and her husband Now when will they head for the South Pacific so she can write An Embarrassment of Coconuts


  8. Julie Durnell Julie Durnell says:

    The uintessential uit your job and sail off to the Caribbean book perfect for the bleak mid winter blues Ann and Steve were intrepid sailors and their story was thrilling and honest A solid 35 stars with uptick for luscious recipes and map detailing their sailing route


  9. Hadi Hadi says:

    Two years on a small boat together 247 when one of you starts as a not very comfortable sailor a situation in which I imagine you would learn about about yourself and your partnerSadly for me Vanderhoof stays away from disclosing anything about herself her husband and how the voyage changed them and their relationship maybe even their relationship with others She sticks to pleasant enough descriptions of the places and people and there are some nice recipes but the book lacked soul and purpose A pleasant but aimless read; I put it down about half way through and I never got round to picking it up again


  10. Eileen Eileen says:

    30 stars liked The water is placid soft blazingly turuoise a pool of melted gemstonesblinding forks of lightning are sizzling down from the night sky and stabbing the surface of the sea around usFrom moments of tranuility to moments of treachery it is an adventure for the reader to vicariously hop onboard Receta a 42 foot sailboat and embark on a two year round trip journey through the Caribbean with Toronto couple Ann and Steve After admiring them at the beginning of the story for having the courage to leave their jobs their familyfriends and their home to set sail on a southern course the admiration for the couple jumps to new heights when witnessing the two of them sailing for hours in darkness and inclimate weather as well as attending to the many responsibilities involved in ensuring such a journey and their relationship remains secure and enjoyableAlthough the first third of the book Part One moved rather slowly since most of the time was spent at sea I did find it interesting to read about the daily logistics of the trip from regular dives below to scrape barnacles off of the hull to the filling of notebooks with copious weather observations received via radio to creatively shoehorning a couple bottles of wine into the boat's limited storage The author also shared a few interesting historical foodie tidbits including the mention that the only two written copies of the secret formula for Angostura Bitters a uniue blend of herbs and spices developed in 1824 are rud to exist one in a New York bank vault and one in Trinidad The activity and interest picked up in the remainder of the book Part Two and Three as the couple spent time on land bonding with other cruisers who happened to also be at port as well as meeting welcoming natives in various countries who introduced them to a rainbow of Caribbean delacacies from fresh fruit to seafood which were then transformed into delicious sounding recipes ranging from curried lobster to pina colada cheesecake I would recommend this book as an enjoyable read to others who like Caribbean food and sailing


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10 thoughts on “An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean Interlude

  1. Kristina Kristina says:

    I almost cried when I finished this book There is such a sense of peace and contentment with life that is exuded from the pages of this book It's not high literature it doesn't contain fancy prose; it is just one damn fine book to read for the pure pleasure of reading It is the book that is embodies what it means to lose oneself in a book For myself I know that as much as I would love to I will probably never take two years off from my life and career and sail around the Caribbean But does that mean I will never know what it feels like? Not necessarily All I need to do is pick up An Embarrassment of Mangoes Even without closing my eyes I heard the crackling lightning and deafening thunder of the sualls; I can smell the lush green foliage moist dirt sweaty bodies and sweet and sharp spices; I can taste the juicy mangoes the fresh fish and the rum rum rum I was constantly smiling reading this book I was so perfectly content to immerse myself in a book where carpe diem and being zen were the main themes along with going with the flow as much as I hate that phrase and adjusting to island time when jus' now means in three hours The good naturedness of the other cruisers and especially the islanders was a wonderful tonic to the rude or otherwise unfriendly interactions to which I have resigned myself in this NYC metro area life Why does it have to be such a shock when people are nice? Or friendly? Or generous? And all without you being so or doing so first? It's astonishing Maybe it has to do with the climate Warmth and sunshine always do me a world of good slogging through seasonal depression in the winter is the worst Maybe it's the food with the abundance and variety of fruits vegetables fish spices and seafood available Sure Whole Foods might stock breadfruit do they even? the author said that they have to be harvested at just the right time so maybe exporting them is inconvenient but I wouldn't pay 20 for something that is guaranteed to taste half as good as it would be on the islands Maybe it's simply the nature of the people with their traditions of singing and dancing and feasting And Carnival Whatever it is it's too bad that isn't found around the worldThe saving grace to finishing this book as if anything could be a balm for that kind of heartwrenching bitter end was trying some of the recipes Food is nothing if not a balm to heal wounds and soothe souls I made the papaya salsa from page 101 but I used mangoes instead I also chopped the red onion much finer rather than leaving it in half rings It was superb On an icky rainy chilly and windy evening I sat down to a meal of fresh hot fish off the stove and a cool and refreshing mango salsa Undoubtedly my mangoes were mere shadowy imitations of those the author herself was able to enjoy but it brought the islands that little bit closer As the author and any seasoned traveler will attest to the best way to experience a culture is through its food The combination of food and adventures sometimes one and the same in this book make it a masterful escape from the ordinary realities through which we slog every day; but I also think that the same principles of carpe diem and contentment and enjoyment are universal and I know I would be well served by trying to find a bit of jus' now and mango salsa in my life

  2. Numidica Numidica says:

    This book appeals to me because Ann and Steve have done what I intend to do in a couple of years sail from the North American mainland south through the Bahamas to the Dominican Republic Puerto Rico the Virgin Islands and on down to the real goal the Lesser Antilles islands Ann's account of their trip from Toronto to Trinidad is replete with good sailor's stories but it is not so long on sailing detail to be off putting to non sailors Ann waxes elouent about her beloved Grenada and I get it having spent time on Nevis Saba and Montserrat as well as the Bahamas out islands; the places farthest from the cruise ship itineraries are still in many ways the old Caribbean where people are friendly and not jaded by dealing with the thousandth American tourist whining that things are not the same as at home Such places are rarer and rarer and I hope to visit Grenada in December so if COVID doesn't wreck my plan I'll see how much it has changed since Ann and Steve first made landfall in 1998 Ann is an expert chef and food writer and since my tastes in food incline toward the simplest possible meals I skipped over some of the purely food related parts I'm embarrassed to say that I have never fired up the oven on my boat though it does make a great supplemental storage locker My idea of haute cuisine in an underway meal is boiling water on the galley stovetop to put in a dehydrated pasta primavera back packing meal so most of Ann's cooking ideas are wasted on meWhere I find common ground with her and a lot of it is regarding the joys of being in touch with nature at sea or in the coves and bays or a remote island Doing a night passage during which small fish jump aboard your boat never fails to make me smile this has happened to me every time I've crossed the Gulf Stream Dolphins crossing and re crossing the bow and following you for half an hour is a magical thing and Ann describes such sea faring lore with the kind of wonder it deserves Her description of the people of the Windward Islands is likewise on target at least in my experience This off the beaten path Caribbean is so different from the places most Americans see when getting off a cruise ship that it's hard to explain to the Carnival Cruise guests what they are missing and in reality I'm happy for them not to go to these few remaining happy and hard to get to places that are not yet selling gold chains and Rolexes by the cruise ship dock This was a uick read and worth the time I spent on it It made me wish for a world without COVID so I can travel again and sail south; many of the Caribbean islands are still closed including the one I most want to go back to 2021 cannot come too soon

  3. Austin Collins Austin Collins says:

    There are sailing books about sailing and then there are sailing books about people and places This is a sailing book about people places and cooking – lots of cookingIf you love food and travel you will enjoy the heck out of this story for that alone even if you couldn't give two hoots about boats And if you love food travel rum and the freedom of the open sea you will love An Embarrassment of MangoesUnlike sailing books that spin terrifying tales of storms and fatigue and jagged rocks and freezing cold and staying just one half step ahead of death and calamity this one weaves a pleasant and engaging story about a couple who take some time off from their careers to cruise the warm clear waters of the Caribbean Ann and Steve are mostly regular normal folks doing something a lot of people dream about They aren't trying to break world records or challenge King Neptune they just wanted to get away for a little while and do it on their own terms Did I mention that there is cooking? An Embarrassment of Mangoes follows their experiences as they sail from Toronto to Trinidad just off the coast of Venezuela and back again on board their 42 foot Tartan sloop Receta Spanish for recipe many of which you will find interspersed with the text and their dinghy Snack Ann begins the story admittedly unsure of the whole deal but soon finds herself an enthusiastic convert to the life of an oceanic vagabondMany sailing stories are written by people who are sailors first and also just happen to be functionally capable of assembling sentences in a way that normally doesn't violate the most important rules of grammar usage and style too egregiously Ann Vanderhoof is an entirely different kind of sailing author she was a magazine editor before she ever embarked on this trip Her voice is confident and competent; her prose is strong and vivid An Embarrassment of Mangoes is a fine investment of your time whether you are secretly dreaming of sailing away someday or content to enjoy the salty wanderings of others from the comfort of your living room reading chair

  4. Prachi Pati Prachi Pati says:

    My Rating 4 awesome starsBook Name An Embarrassment of Mangoes A Caribbean InterludeAuthor Ann VanderhoofGenre Non FictionTravelogueCultureHistoryCaribbean food recipe guideBefore I start my review here is some trivia Did you know because I didn't before I read this book Receta means recipe in Spanish?Conch is a popular seafood in the Bahamas?Luperon is called a 'Hurricane Hole'?Gugua are not a strange species of insect but actually what the public minivans are called? LolLambi is not lamb but the Creole word for Conch?Fig is not Fig but actually a Banana in the Caribbean who knewAnd many many such little facts if you've found this interesting I would say you don't even have to read the rest of the review just read the book hahahOk so as part of the 2017 book club reading challenge we have a traveltourist challenge where the moderator will select a placeregion for each month as the topic and we have to select a book that is either set in that placelocation or whose author is from that location and read and review it for that month So for January the location was Caribbean islands and after a lot of skimming over the internet on various options I chose to read this book just because the description and the author seemed very real to me and what better way to travel if not really traveling than by reading a good travelogue? ;I don't read a lot of non fiction to be frank so I wasn't sure how to rate this book But I figured I did find the book interesting and amusing and I also did learn a whole lot of things so this definitely ualifies for a 4 and above ratingThe book is written by Ann Vanderhoof about how she and her partner Steve decided and planned to take a 2 year break from their daily 9 9 jobs in Canada and go sailing in their own sailing boat across the Caribbean islands It talks about her fears her anxiety in the beginning since she has never sailed that long before in open ocean her amazement and pure joys of trying out all the local fruits vegetables and seafood that they catch fresh out of the water her loving interactions with the locals her huge list of recipes that I really want to try but can't because I don't have most of those ingredients or cooking tools available with me yet her test of strength and grit during the storm nights manning the sailboat her joys of finding delight in the nature and in minimalism and her disappointment when the journey is overI've never sailed nor have I visited any of the Caribbean islands but reading this book I felt like I was on a virtual tour there and now I've added a visit to the Caribbean at least to one of the islands to my list of travel destinations nowlol DSo I'd recommend this book if you like reading travelogues that are real filled with real stories humor and lots of facts on sailing fishing history culture and my favorite touch to the book the recipes at the end of each chapter

  5. Missy J Missy J says:

    Happy 2018 everybodyActually finished this book a couple of days ago but haven't gotten a chance to write a review yet I wanted to start 2018 with a light breezy and fun book which has been on my to read shelf for uite some timeAn Embarrassment of Mangoes was the perfect book for me It is a mix of traveling sailing and cooking Ann and Steve are two Canadian professionals who decided to leave their work for two years and sail through the Caribbean a dream But there's reality too Ann and Steve prepared themselves for 5 years to save up money pay the mortgage of their house which they will rent out to have a monthly income during their travelsI'm not really into sailing and some of the technical aspects of sailing in this book made it sound very complicated But I did appreciate to read about this different life and their adjustment It wasn't always smooth sailing Most of the time they spent studying the weather and if they go to buy groceries it takes a full day to do just that Also you can't just go from one island to another There needs to be preparation and communication What I loved was Ann and Steve's love for local food and customs They especially left an imprint in Grenada closely befriending a local family After each chapter we get one to three recipes They all sounded amazing unfortunately I cannot find a fresh lobster where I live to try the recipe out But the recipes were really lovelyI appreciate reading the adventure of Ann and Steve They are wonderful positive passionate and hardworking people I highly recommend this book

  6. Jessica Haider Jessica Haider says:

    As the book blurb states An Embarassment of Mangoes is remniscent of Under the Tuscan Sun in that it is a travel memoir about a women who steps away from her real life of working her job and the dealing with other everyday stresses The author and her husband take 2 years off from their work and set sail from Toronto to the Caribbean The book really made me want to do the sameespecially now when I am bogged down with deadlines and too much work at the office I NEED A VACATIONThe author did a great job of recounting their experiences sailing and describing the character charms and food of each island they visited The end of each chapter had several recipes of food that she made on that leg of the journey

  7. A A says:

    I really enjoyed An Embarrassment of Mangoes but it didn't uite rise to the standards of 4 stars It was a solid 35 and a couple of chapters made it to 5 stars but it was just a bit too inconsistent to make the 4 star rank The basic premise is that this couple from Toronto take the plunge uit their jobs and head off for a two year adventure down the coast of the US through the Caribbean to Trinidad before returning to Canada I applaud the hutzzpah that it took to uit their jobs and rent out their house while they were still young enough to enjoy their trip Would that my spouse would agree and I would be on the pathBut the relating of the story while entertaining just wasn't captivating The author was a magazine editor but it is clear that while she is a talented author she isn't in the same category as Bill Bryson Tony Horowitz or William Least Heat Moon The stories about the trip were educational and full of lots of interesting details but didn't leave you laughing crying cringing or scarred The book is just a very well documented travelogue as if you were reading the diary of a decent author If you love sailing or the Caribbean then you should read the bookBut be prepared for most of the book to take place in four locations with little fillers to explain the rest of the trip I think the author must have spent at least 14 of her trip anchored in Grenada Still great gusto just to do it and take the trip and for that I applaud her and her husband Now when will they head for the South Pacific so she can write An Embarrassment of Coconuts

  8. Julie Durnell Julie Durnell says:

    The uintessential uit your job and sail off to the Caribbean book perfect for the bleak mid winter blues Ann and Steve were intrepid sailors and their story was thrilling and honest A solid 35 stars with uptick for luscious recipes and map detailing their sailing route

  9. Hadi Hadi says:

    Two years on a small boat together 247 when one of you starts as a not very comfortable sailor a situation in which I imagine you would learn about about yourself and your partnerSadly for me Vanderhoof stays away from disclosing anything about herself her husband and how the voyage changed them and their relationship maybe even their relationship with others She sticks to pleasant enough descriptions of the places and people and there are some nice recipes but the book lacked soul and purpose A pleasant but aimless read; I put it down about half way through and I never got round to picking it up again

  10. Eileen Eileen says:

    30 stars liked The water is placid soft blazingly turuoise a pool of melted gemstonesblinding forks of lightning are sizzling down from the night sky and stabbing the surface of the sea around usFrom moments of tranuility to moments of treachery it is an adventure for the reader to vicariously hop onboard Receta a 42 foot sailboat and embark on a two year round trip journey through the Caribbean with Toronto couple Ann and Steve After admiring them at the beginning of the story for having the courage to leave their jobs their familyfriends and their home to set sail on a southern course the admiration for the couple jumps to new heights when witnessing the two of them sailing for hours in darkness and inclimate weather as well as attending to the many responsibilities involved in ensuring such a journey and their relationship remains secure and enjoyableAlthough the first third of the book Part One moved rather slowly since most of the time was spent at sea I did find it interesting to read about the daily logistics of the trip from regular dives below to scrape barnacles off of the hull to the filling of notebooks with copious weather observations received via radio to creatively shoehorning a couple bottles of wine into the boat's limited storage The author also shared a few interesting historical foodie tidbits including the mention that the only two written copies of the secret formula for Angostura Bitters a uniue blend of herbs and spices developed in 1824 are rud to exist one in a New York bank vault and one in Trinidad The activity and interest picked up in the remainder of the book Part Two and Three as the couple spent time on land bonding with other cruisers who happened to also be at port as well as meeting welcoming natives in various countries who introduced them to a rainbow of Caribbean delacacies from fresh fruit to seafood which were then transformed into delicious sounding recipes ranging from curried lobster to pina colada cheesecake I would recommend this book as an enjoyable read to others who like Caribbean food and sailing

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