Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas PDF/EPUB

Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas PDF/EPUB

Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas [Epub] ❧ Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas By Hélène A. Guerber – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Over the centuries, Northern mythology has exerted much influence on Western customs, language, and literature Its principal theme of the perpetual struggle of the beneficent forces of nature against the Norsemen: MOBI ☆ Over the centuries, Northern mythology has exerted much influence on Western customs, language, and literature Its principal theme of the perpetual struggle of the beneficent forces of nature against the injurious, and its twin characteristics of dark tragedy and grim humor, tinge much European literature and music, most notably Wagner’s Ring CycleIn this volume, a noted scholar of myth and folklore has assembled a rich collection Myths of PDF/EPUB ² of Northern mythology as preserved in the Eddas and sagas of Iceland These are perhaps the purest versions of the original myths, thanks to the island’s remoteness and lack of contact with outside influences Both grand and tragical, the ageold tales tell of the creation of the world; the heroic deeds of such gods and heroes as Odin, Thor, and Siegfried; the machinations of the evil Loki; of the Norsemen: Kindle Ô the fantastical adventures of giants, dwarfs, and elves; the twilight of the gods; and much else Sixtyfour marvelous, atmospheric illustrations add an additional dimension of charmIn this convenient, reliable edition, Myths of the Norsemen offers not only hours of reading entertainment but also valuable insights into the nature and meaning of myth and how it constitutes part of the deep and ancient wellspring of Western culture.


10 thoughts on “Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas

  1. Belinda Belinda says:

    4 stars - English Ebook -🍃🍃🍃
    Quote from the book :
    Of Ymir’s flesh
    Was earth created,
    Of his bonen the Hills,
    Of his hear trees and plants,
    Of his skull the havens,
    And of his boos,
    The gentlemen powers
    Formed Midgard for Sons of men,
    But of his brain
    The heavy clouds are
    all created.
    🌳🌳🌳
    I realy like history. Part of that is mythology. So sometimes inbetween novels ect I like to read this kind of books. 🌼🌼🌼


  2. Jael Jael says:

    A few years ago, I had bought this book from Barnes and Noble's online store. I didn't realize until I started reading it and looked at the info on its Goodreads page, this book is actually a reprint from 1909. If I had known that, I would not have bought it.

    The book is largely summarizes different Gods and some of the popular Norse stories. However, I would not recommend this book to anybody interested in learning Norse Mythology (maybe if you wanted some nice illustrations).

    I wouldn't recommend this book due to it being inaccurate and very outdated. For example on page 237, Guerber states Glut (Gloot) was Loki's first wife, when she actually wasn't. She was the wife to Hálogi, a King of Norway according to the Thorstein Saga (there are other listed inaccuracies such as pointed out by this Amazon reviewer). Also, sometimes what the author writes and what she quotes from other texts conflicted with one another. For example, the author points out that Einheriar, the fallen warriors who are brought to Valhalla by the Valkyries, feast/gorge themselves every night on the divine boar, Saehrimnir. But the quoted passage from Lay of Grimnir, Anderson’s version: “Andhrimnir cooks in Eldhrimnir Saehrimnir: ‘Tis the best of flesh; But few know What the einherjes eat.” I did some looking and the Einherjes that I could find (not the band) were another possible term for the Einheriar.

    The use of the authors some accounts/mythologists/authorities in relating a tale and never citing where she had garnered the information from, really irked my inner nerd. Each time, I wanted to strangle the book I had to remind myself that a lot of other authors I've read pre-1980's don't believe in the notion of citation.

    Another point, that really irks me to no end is: Loki: God of Evil... ummm, okay. I have a bad feeling where she is taking this. At first a god, he gradually becomes 'god and devil combined,' and ends in being held in general detestation as an exact counterpart of the mediaeval Lucifer. Yep, she went there. I actually did some digging. In 1889 this dude, Sophus Bugge, saw Loki as a variant to Christianity, Lucifer (Bugge was trying to connect Norse myths to christian prototypes). Apparently, this idea was popular with Guerber, too. Furthermore, I'm sure other authors were doing this at the time, Guerber allows Christianity to interfere with her work. I lost count of how many times she used heathen in her book and somehow pre-Christian people are ignorant because they believed stormy nights and hounds baying on such a night were omens for death cause of the Wild Hunt.

    I am not sure if this is due to the times of not differentiating the two or due to lazy research, but Greek and Roman Pantheons are not the same. For the last chapter, Guerber tries to draw similarities between Norse mythology and Greek mythology. It would be more scholarly if she had used the correct Pantheon, instead she discussed Jupiter, Juno, Pluto, Proserpine, etc. which are all Roman, not Greek.


  3. Eric Tanafon Eric Tanafon says:

    Physically, this book is gorgeous. There are some great illustrations. Many poetic quotes are included, both from translations of the Edda and later, original works. The material covers the core myths plus the Saga of the Volsungs and some additional tales that come from sources other than the Eddas. The actual stories, however, are marred by the author inserting bits that are, as far as I can tell, her own inventions. Even more problematic is the fact that she feels compelled to tell us what it all Really Means--that is, as seen through a nineteenth-century materialistic filter.

    In my view, the stories we call myths can mean more than they appear to, but they don't mean less. It follows that every other tale is most likely not an elaborately coded retelling of the fact that it gets cold in the winter, while in the summer, the weather gets warmer and crops grow. But having once decided that myths are 'explanations of the natural world', your true nineteenth-century mythologist sees them everywhere they look, like a hammer-bearing guy hallucinating a world full of nails. The most egregious example of this peculiar academic fixation might be the story of Vidar. Vidar is, of course, Odin's son, who is said to avenge his father at Ragnarok by tearing the Fenris Wolf apart. In order to pull this off, he's given a shoe made from all the scraps of leather thrown away through the ages. This is the context in which Guerber, without a blush, brings up a theory that since Vidar has only one special shoe, he must be one-legged. From there it's a short jump (for her compatriots) to the conclusion that Vidar personifies a waterspout(!) that quenches the destructive fire that the Wolf no doubt symbolizes. Among other things, this goes to show that these theorizers have never actually tried to force apart the jaws of a supernatural wolf. It would have been better for them, in all sorts of ways, if they had. For one thing, they might have realized that you probably want to avoid stepping into said wolf's mouth with both feet.

    All that said, there are nuggets here and there that make this book worth dipping into. For example, Guerber includes a summary of Odin's Ravens' Song (Hrafnagaldr Odins), an Eddaic poem I'd never heard of before. It may be a later work--some place the author in the 1700s--but it's still fascinating to read.

    So, a worthwhile book to peruse, but keep your metaphorical salt shaker handy.


  4. Cat Rector Cat Rector says:

    I'm not a scholar of Norse Mythology but I loved this book. A lot of the information is the same as what I've gotten from the Prose and Poetic Eddas, with a few exceptions. It's important to remember that the original printing of this book was for 1909 and some things have probably been proven untrue or dismissed in that time, but I found 95% of it to be an accurate and well written account (so far as my own knowledge goes).

    Aside from the text, the book is GORGEOUS. It's faux leather hard cover with gold embossing, a ribbon bookmark, gold edged pages and is full of black and white art. It's the most beautiful book I own.

    5/5 would buy again.


  5. Simsian Simsian says:

    A pretty poor mesh of hodge-podge Norse mythology with improperly interlaced commentary. In all honesty, a detrimental treatment insofar as the author judges the stories against Christian mythology. Open to suggestions of a better treatment of Norse mythology. I have been quite interested since reading Halldor Laxness.


  6. Hershel Layne Hershel Layne says:

    For nearly 20 years I have studied Mythology, Norse being my favorite. That is until I read this book. This book is so underwhelming that it made me feel less for the stories, which were wrote not as full stories, but rather as very brief synopsis.
    You are told that this, this and this happens, without any detail, usually the detail left out are the details which make the Gods seem, godly. Instead you walk away remembering more about how they were outwitted time and time again, than any of their heroic deeds.
    The final nail in the coffin was the very last chapter when describing the similarities between Greek(As was written in the book) and Norse mythologies, the author neglected to use Greek names for the major Greek gods, but instead named them by their Roman counterparts.
    If you don't know anything at all about Norse Mythology, this is a good starter book, but it may leave you not wanting to learn more. If you know anything at all about Norse Mythology, read something else as this is just written in shorthand and only gives the gist of the stories.


  7. Caroline Åsgård Caroline Åsgård says:

    Since I'm norwegian, I've grown up with the tales of norse mythology (and yes, that's my real last name), and I love them. But pretty quickly into this book, I was annoyed. A lot of the names are butchered (Svart-alfa-heim? Bifröst?), and details were left out of the stories. Lots of random stuff inserted too. There are some nice old illustrations though.

    It obviously starts with how the world was created, and then goes on to tell you about all the gods and other creatures and the stories about them. Then we have (parts of?) the Sigurd and Frithiof sagas, which I thought was a nice addition, since I haven't read those before. And of course it ends with Ragnarok, and then compares norse mythology with greek. In the back there's a 50-page index, which makes the book much shorter than you think.

    So I'm not sure if I would actually recommend this if you're interested in norse mythology.


  8. Jim Jim says:

    Good Popular book about Norse Myths. Being of mostly Norwegian Ancestry, I find these stories great. THESE ARE MY PEOPLE! LOL


    I have to admit I'm a bit of a sucker for these Barnes and Noble Collectible Leather books. I have no Illusion that they are really Collectible but they are rather lovely. LOL


  9. Brianna Silva Brianna Silva says:

    I liked the stories (I'm a slut for Norse culture and mythology), but not so much the presentation.

    Compared to Neil Gaiman's delightful telling of the Norse myths, this book is so... dry. It doesn't tell the stories, but sort of just reports them, all matter of fact, without any style or gusto.

    What it does have going for it is thoroughness. That's why I picked it up after reading Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology, because I wanted all the Norse myths I could possibly consume. Gaiman's book just includes a sample.

    I did get that, I feel. I probably know all the myths now! I just wish I hadn't felt like I was dragging myself through them!


  10. John John says:

    If ever you wanted to know the background to just about every known Norse Myth, then this is your book. So complete is this volume that along with The Children of Odin both are used extensively by video game developers as reference.
    Dont try and read from cover to cover (at 620 pages it would be quite a read) but I do recommend having it on your coffee table and dipping in and out when you have just finished a book or are bored with telly or with what you're reading.


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10 thoughts on “Myths of the Norsemen: From the Eddas and Sagas

  1. Belinda Belinda says:

    4 stars - English Ebook -🍃🍃🍃
    Quote from the book :
    Of Ymir’s flesh
    Was earth created,
    Of his bonen the Hills,
    Of his hear trees and plants,
    Of his skull the havens,
    And of his boos,
    The gentlemen powers
    Formed Midgard for Sons of men,
    But of his brain
    The heavy clouds are
    all created.
    🌳🌳🌳
    I realy like history. Part of that is mythology. So sometimes inbetween novels ect I like to read this kind of books. 🌼🌼🌼

  2. Jael Jael says:

    A few years ago, I had bought this book from Barnes and Noble's online store. I didn't realize until I started reading it and looked at the info on its Goodreads page, this book is actually a reprint from 1909. If I had known that, I would not have bought it.

    The book is largely summarizes different Gods and some of the popular Norse stories. However, I would not recommend this book to anybody interested in learning Norse Mythology (maybe if you wanted some nice illustrations).

    I wouldn't recommend this book due to it being inaccurate and very outdated. For example on page 237, Guerber states Glut (Gloot) was Loki's first wife, when she actually wasn't. She was the wife to Hálogi, a King of Norway according to the Thorstein Saga (there are other listed inaccuracies such as pointed out by this Amazon reviewer). Also, sometimes what the author writes and what she quotes from other texts conflicted with one another. For example, the author points out that Einheriar, the fallen warriors who are brought to Valhalla by the Valkyries, feast/gorge themselves every night on the divine boar, Saehrimnir. But the quoted passage from Lay of Grimnir, Anderson’s version: “Andhrimnir cooks in Eldhrimnir Saehrimnir: ‘Tis the best of flesh; But few know What the einherjes eat.” I did some looking and the Einherjes that I could find (not the band) were another possible term for the Einheriar.

    The use of the authors some accounts/mythologists/authorities in relating a tale and never citing where she had garnered the information from, really irked my inner nerd. Each time, I wanted to strangle the book I had to remind myself that a lot of other authors I've read pre-1980's don't believe in the notion of citation.

    Another point, that really irks me to no end is: Loki: God of Evil... ummm, okay. I have a bad feeling where she is taking this. At first a god, he gradually becomes 'god and devil combined,' and ends in being held in general detestation as an exact counterpart of the mediaeval Lucifer. Yep, she went there. I actually did some digging. In 1889 this dude, Sophus Bugge, saw Loki as a variant to Christianity, Lucifer (Bugge was trying to connect Norse myths to christian prototypes). Apparently, this idea was popular with Guerber, too. Furthermore, I'm sure other authors were doing this at the time, Guerber allows Christianity to interfere with her work. I lost count of how many times she used heathen in her book and somehow pre-Christian people are ignorant because they believed stormy nights and hounds baying on such a night were omens for death cause of the Wild Hunt.

    I am not sure if this is due to the times of not differentiating the two or due to lazy research, but Greek and Roman Pantheons are not the same. For the last chapter, Guerber tries to draw similarities between Norse mythology and Greek mythology. It would be more scholarly if she had used the correct Pantheon, instead she discussed Jupiter, Juno, Pluto, Proserpine, etc. which are all Roman, not Greek.

  3. Eric Tanafon Eric Tanafon says:

    Physically, this book is gorgeous. There are some great illustrations. Many poetic quotes are included, both from translations of the Edda and later, original works. The material covers the core myths plus the Saga of the Volsungs and some additional tales that come from sources other than the Eddas. The actual stories, however, are marred by the author inserting bits that are, as far as I can tell, her own inventions. Even more problematic is the fact that she feels compelled to tell us what it all Really Means--that is, as seen through a nineteenth-century materialistic filter.

    In my view, the stories we call myths can mean more than they appear to, but they don't mean less. It follows that every other tale is most likely not an elaborately coded retelling of the fact that it gets cold in the winter, while in the summer, the weather gets warmer and crops grow. But having once decided that myths are 'explanations of the natural world', your true nineteenth-century mythologist sees them everywhere they look, like a hammer-bearing guy hallucinating a world full of nails. The most egregious example of this peculiar academic fixation might be the story of Vidar. Vidar is, of course, Odin's son, who is said to avenge his father at Ragnarok by tearing the Fenris Wolf apart. In order to pull this off, he's given a shoe made from all the scraps of leather thrown away through the ages. This is the context in which Guerber, without a blush, brings up a theory that since Vidar has only one special shoe, he must be one-legged. From there it's a short jump (for her compatriots) to the conclusion that Vidar personifies a waterspout(!) that quenches the destructive fire that the Wolf no doubt symbolizes. Among other things, this goes to show that these theorizers have never actually tried to force apart the jaws of a supernatural wolf. It would have been better for them, in all sorts of ways, if they had. For one thing, they might have realized that you probably want to avoid stepping into said wolf's mouth with both feet.

    All that said, there are nuggets here and there that make this book worth dipping into. For example, Guerber includes a summary of Odin's Ravens' Song (Hrafnagaldr Odins), an Eddaic poem I'd never heard of before. It may be a later work--some place the author in the 1700s--but it's still fascinating to read.

    So, a worthwhile book to peruse, but keep your metaphorical salt shaker handy.

  4. Cat Rector Cat Rector says:

    I'm not a scholar of Norse Mythology but I loved this book. A lot of the information is the same as what I've gotten from the Prose and Poetic Eddas, with a few exceptions. It's important to remember that the original printing of this book was for 1909 and some things have probably been proven untrue or dismissed in that time, but I found 95% of it to be an accurate and well written account (so far as my own knowledge goes).

    Aside from the text, the book is GORGEOUS. It's faux leather hard cover with gold embossing, a ribbon bookmark, gold edged pages and is full of black and white art. It's the most beautiful book I own.

    5/5 would buy again.

  5. Simsian Simsian says:

    A pretty poor mesh of hodge-podge Norse mythology with improperly interlaced commentary. In all honesty, a detrimental treatment insofar as the author judges the stories against Christian mythology. Open to suggestions of a better treatment of Norse mythology. I have been quite interested since reading Halldor Laxness.

  6. Hershel Layne Hershel Layne says:

    For nearly 20 years I have studied Mythology, Norse being my favorite. That is until I read this book. This book is so underwhelming that it made me feel less for the stories, which were wrote not as full stories, but rather as very brief synopsis.
    You are told that this, this and this happens, without any detail, usually the detail left out are the details which make the Gods seem, godly. Instead you walk away remembering more about how they were outwitted time and time again, than any of their heroic deeds.
    The final nail in the coffin was the very last chapter when describing the similarities between Greek(As was written in the book) and Norse mythologies, the author neglected to use Greek names for the major Greek gods, but instead named them by their Roman counterparts.
    If you don't know anything at all about Norse Mythology, this is a good starter book, but it may leave you not wanting to learn more. If you know anything at all about Norse Mythology, read something else as this is just written in shorthand and only gives the gist of the stories.

  7. Caroline Åsgård Caroline Åsgård says:

    Since I'm norwegian, I've grown up with the tales of norse mythology (and yes, that's my real last name), and I love them. But pretty quickly into this book, I was annoyed. A lot of the names are butchered (Svart-alfa-heim? Bifröst?), and details were left out of the stories. Lots of random stuff inserted too. There are some nice old illustrations though.

    It obviously starts with how the world was created, and then goes on to tell you about all the gods and other creatures and the stories about them. Then we have (parts of?) the Sigurd and Frithiof sagas, which I thought was a nice addition, since I haven't read those before. And of course it ends with Ragnarok, and then compares norse mythology with greek. In the back there's a 50-page index, which makes the book much shorter than you think.

    So I'm not sure if I would actually recommend this if you're interested in norse mythology.

  8. Jim Jim says:

    Good Popular book about Norse Myths. Being of mostly Norwegian Ancestry, I find these stories great. THESE ARE MY PEOPLE! LOL


    I have to admit I'm a bit of a sucker for these Barnes and Noble Collectible Leather books. I have no Illusion that they are really Collectible but they are rather lovely. LOL

  9. Brianna Silva Brianna Silva says:

    I liked the stories (I'm a slut for Norse culture and mythology), but not so much the presentation.

    Compared to Neil Gaiman's delightful telling of the Norse myths, this book is so... dry. It doesn't tell the stories, but sort of just reports them, all matter of fact, without any style or gusto.

    What it does have going for it is thoroughness. That's why I picked it up after reading Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology, because I wanted all the Norse myths I could possibly consume. Gaiman's book just includes a sample.

    I did get that, I feel. I probably know all the myths now! I just wish I hadn't felt like I was dragging myself through them!

  10. John John says:

    If ever you wanted to know the background to just about every known Norse Myth, then this is your book. So complete is this volume that along with The Children of Odin both are used extensively by video game developers as reference.
    Dont try and read from cover to cover (at 620 pages it would be quite a read) but I do recommend having it on your coffee table and dipping in and out when you have just finished a book or are bored with telly or with what you're reading.

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