The Singing Sword ePUB É The Singing PDF \

The Singing Sword ePUB É The Singing PDF \

The Singing Sword [PDF] ✓ The Singing Sword By Jack Whyte – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk We know the legends Arthur brought justice to a land that had known only cruelty and force; his father Uther carved a kingdom out of the chaos of the fallen Roman Empire; the sword Excalibur drawn fro We know the legends Arthur brought justice to a land that had known only cruelty and force; his father Uther carved a kingdom out of the chaos of the fallen Roman Empire; the sword Excalibur The Singing PDF \ drawn from stone by England's greatest kingBut legends do not tell the whole tale Legends do not tell of the despairing Roman soldiers abandoned by their empire faced with the choice of fleeing back to Rome or struggling to create a last stronghold against the barbarian onslaughts from the north and east Legends do not tell of Arthur's great grandfather Publius Varrus the warrior who marked the boundaries of a reborn empire with his own shed blood; they do not tell of Publius's wife Luceiia British born and Roman raised whose fierce beauty burned pale next to her passion for law and honorWith The Camulod Chronicles Jack Whyte tells us what legend has forgotten the history of blood and violence passion and steel out of which was forged a great sword and a great nation The Singing Sword continues the gripping epic begun in The Skystone As the great night of the Dark Ages falls over Roman Britain a lone man and woman fight to build a last stronghold of law and learning a crude hill fort which one day long after their deaths will become a great city known as Camelot.


10 thoughts on “The Singing Sword

  1. Markus Markus says:

    The Singing Sword is a book of connections It is very much a seuel to The Skystone but it’s also the book truly beginning to turn The Camulod Chronicles into a work of Arthurian legendThe withdrawal of the Roman legions from Britain is as good as complete Varrus and Britannicus lead their little Colony into the future a legendary sword is forged and through intermarriage with the local Celts the two Romans are gifted with a grandson each one named Uther Pendragon the other MerlynThe second book in the series was a lot enjoyable than the first maybe particularly because it starts becoming recognizable as Arthurian fiction while retaining the historical realistic perspective from The Skystone The Singing Sword also had its tedious parts but overall it just made me and invested in the series


  2. Algernon (Darth Anyan) Algernon (Darth Anyan) says:

    More of a journal; less of a legal document I add my own personal thoughts and observations There are many of my opinions and thoughts mixed in with the events As I said it is a personal history and sometimes almost embarrassingly egotistical ‘The Singing Sword’ is the second half of a story that was probably too long to be published in a single volume It’s a safe bet that those readers who appreciated the first volume will not be disappointed in the second one and those who didn’t should start the journey there with ‘The Skystone’My opening uote is from Publius Varrus the main narrator of the book a professional Roman soldier who is also a very talented blacksmith and describes his decision to keep a journal about the progress of the ColonyThis Colony is a special project established and nurtured by the best friend and mentor of Publius Varrus the Senator Caius Britannicus This visionary has recognized the portents of the imminent collapse of the Roman Empire at the end of the fourth century AD and organized the farmers around his estate in southern Britain into a self supporting armed colony that will be capable of surviving the retreat of the Roman legions and the increasing attacks from Saxons Franks Picts and other assorted barbarians Publius and Varrus ally themselves with the local Celtic king whose family name of Pendragon should ring some bells for people familiar with a certain legendary heroThis second book is dealing mostly with the development of the Colony repelling marauders coming in war bands over the Channel re building the ancient fort on a hill about the main estate procuring iron that would soon be precious than gold flying under the radar of the Roman administrators who would treat the colonists as outlaws training their paramilitary forces and organizing an independent governing and legislative structure view spoiler including the use of a Round Table in Council hide spoiler


  3. Mark Halse Mark Halse says:

    With this third reading of THE SINGING SWORD I am reminded of all of the reasons that I love this series Deep and lovable characters sweeping storyline and twisted dramaIn this installment we follow ol' Publius Varrus as he truly creates the very roots of King Arthur The idea of mounted knights are created a round council is formed Uther and Merlin are fathered and most importantly Excalibur is bornThis book and series are a slow burn Possibly the slowest burning series that I've ever read but I love getting lost in an epic of this magnitude Envision Robin Hobb with details and a highly episodic narrative I feel that even the impatient could really enjoy this well written storyI do find the characters to be pompous and preachy at times but that is really just how Jack Whyte writes his characters They all have to be complete genius dickholes sometimes for them to accomplish the impossible HIGHLY RECOMMENDED


  4. Carrie Slager Carrie Slager says:

    I’m the sort of person that loves doing jigsaw puzzles which is part of the reason why I loved The Singing Sword It’s a lot like a jigsaw puzzle what with tiny barley recognizable pieces of the Arthurian legends slowly being dropped into place We got the outline or the edge pieces in the first book in A Dream of Eagles formerly known as The Camulod Chronicles The Skystone and now we’re starting to fill in the easy partsPublius is obviously mature than he was in the first book and it’s almost interesting to see this mature worldly point of view as he and Caius struggle to build up the Colony Their alliance with King Ullic the growing threat of foreign invaders reaching Roman territory and an old villain reappearing made The Singing Sword very exciting and an entertaining read Of course there are the bad parts of the novel as well and I would definitely not recommend it for people who are sensitive to gore Jack Whyte writes as Publius would have in the times and is less sensitive to the violence all around him Therefore it’s difficult for someone with modern views on violence to accept the ancient world for what it was but The Singing Sword feels all the authentic for thatNot only is Publius mature than when we left him at the end of The Skystone all of the other characters are mature Their newly acuired maturity does not mean that they’re boring or that they don’t have character arcs uite the opposite in fact Fans of the first book will love to see their favourite characters change even and will learn to love the new generation that helps bring the legend of Camelot closer to realityI give this book 55 stars


  5. Tim Mcdougall Tim Mcdougall says:

    Whyte starts with a great concept an alternative view of the Arthur mythos this time with Arthur's ancestors as Roman soldiers And he does some of the best battle scenes in the business He does his research choreographs them well and generates real tension when he's focusing hereSo why he decides to go on for hundreds of pages at a time while his main characters do nothing but extol the virtues of farming or the beauty of his wife or the virtues of working hard as a blacksmith is beyond me It doesn't feel like he did the research to make these sections interesting or that he really cares to and his characterizations are too flat to make these extended sections work To make it worse there is absolutely no tension in the plot for these sections I felt like I was just plowing through to get to the conclusion A tedious enough read for me at least that I dropped the series despite some recommendations from family


  6. Benjamin Thomas Benjamin Thomas says:

    The second book in the “Camulod Chronicles” picks up shortly after the events of the first book The Skystone It continues the tale of Caius Britannicus and Publius Varrus both great grandfathers of the future King Arthur of Briton as they continue to build the colony of Camulod during the turn of the 5th century AD when Rome was pulling out of Briton and leaving the Brits the Celts and other assorted peoples to deal with various invading groups such as the Saxons and the NorthmenI love the way this series is a truly accurate historical novel series at this point at least that also just happens to be related to the Arthurian legends As the colony of Camulod gets established we get to see major historical events and influences unfold For example due to the need for mobility in responding to threats the art of warfare using horses is advanced Rome was never known for its cavalry but now there is a need for well trained warriors on horses A breeding program is introduced to increase the size of the horses the stirrup is introduced and the swords are lengthened to allow use from horseback All of these developments are actual historical occurrences We also get to witness the first rough efforts to convert a Senate like council meeting where elitism prevails to a newer style of local government in the form of a round circle of chairs where all have an eual voice I think we all know where this will lead to in an Arthurian senseBut importantly this is a well told tale Just as in the first novel this is a first person account by Publius Varrus a former legionnaire partly crippled through a battle injury and now a master black smith One might correctly guess from the title that he is the eventual crafter of Excalibur His first person point of view lends a great perspective on bringing these great events down to the individual level and allowing the everyday life of families lovers builders etc to be as personal and emotional for the reader as it is for him Great and satisfying personal achievements are matched by great loss and even tragedy It is rare when a fictional novel brings a tear to my eye but this one managed to do itAll of these great historical shifts in thinking and techniue take many years The first two novels cover most of Caius and Publius’s long lives but it is inevitable that we move on I’m excited for the third book in the series The Eagles' Brood where I understand that Publius’s grandson takes over the first person account His name is Caius Merlyn Britannicus first cousin of Uther Pendragon


  7. Don Maker Don Maker says:

    Rather than the romantic fantastical versions of Camelot this is the story of how it all might have really come about This is book two of at least nine in the Camulod Chronicles and I have ordered books one and three after reading this Because the story begins at the tail end of the fourth century it is very much about the Roman influence on Britain and how the two cultures merged together as the Roman Empire was disintegrating It seems Mr Whyte did his research as the lifestyles and events seem authentic and all of the elements of the Arthurian legend come about in a very believable mannerThe characters are well drawn and fully developed and the action is interesting whether it involves a battle or a billows—the main character in this novel Publius Varrus becomes a blacksmith after retiring from the Roman legions and of course creates a marvelous sword he names Excalibur As a writer it was very impressive to me that Mr Whyte could maintain both interest and tension in fairly long descriptions of seemingly mundane things albeit he either immediately or eventually made clear how they tied into both the immediate story and the future legend There were a couple of long philosophical conversations that were off the main topic although they did relate to some of the sub plots but he managed to make them interesting as well at least to meIf you enjoy historical fiction lively portrayals of ancient periods especially England and revel in the Arthurian legend in particular I think you will love this series It is very slow in developing as is life itself but very rich in its detail and authenticity


  8. Heidi Heidi says:

    So the Chronicles of the Roman Preppers continues to be unintentionally hilarious as old war buddies band together to prepare for the coming of the Roman Apocalypse Still fairly entertaining although not much happens I would have given it 3 stars if I had not become weary of the women's roles in this story and totally offended by the way he describes gay men I haven't decided whether to continue my rereading of this series as prelude to finally finishing the last volumes or spend my time on something less hopelessly trapped in its own limited perspectives


  9. Barth Siemens Barth Siemens says:

    Gaius Publius Varrus the first person narrator lived a rich and varied life that he tells through this series by Jack Whyte If Commander Varrus has one fault it is that he halts his narration all too often for an exposition on this or that—often about his long held dream to smith a sword for the ages As a reader these tangents disrupts the flow and sidelines my suspension of disbeliefFor someone who said so much about smithing swords I was dismayed that he wanted me to accept that it was sharp from the cast—setting aside the likelihood of it turning out well from a mold at all


  10. Beorn Beorn says:

    Due to the rather weird unhelpful way the reissues are listed I am reading this as book two in the Legends Of Camelot series as that is how they work out chronologically in terms of the story arc so this book should only be read after 'The War Of The Celts'Don't get me wrong there are a few good things in this book but for the most part this is a remarkably tedious turgid affairIt says a lot about the mostly tepid feel of a book when a number of massacres drenched in blood and an invasion by barbarian Franks fail to lift the general feel of the book beyond woodenI won't go into too much detail on that front save ruining any of the plot but suffice to say that there will be a number of chapters where you'll gladly skip ahead entire paragraphs as it feels far like reading through a bureaucrat's take on Arthurian legend rather than an authors All red tape musings deliberations and wistful thinking and very little actionThere is also a pretty significant anachronism here in the authors adamant suggestion that the main protagonists invented the idea of cavalry using a longer sword instead of a spear when that method had already been adopted and used by imperial cavalry for over a century before the time period in which this book is set On top of that the author also makes the insinuation that the Celts living in what would later become Wales had no knowledge of longswords only using axes as weapons even though it's practically the most basic of common knowledge that the majority of barbarian tribes the Roman Empire went up against especially the latter ones who hadn't been co opted into the Roman army itself had used longswords for generationsIt is that double edged anachronism on top of an overall stodgy feel to the book that prevents me from being able to particularly praise the storyAside from the long tedious parts of the story dedicated to military planning or boredom inducing bureacracy the novel is still relatively easy to read and compelling enough to keep you ploughing throughThere's a rather farcical reappearance of the main protagonist from the last book Claudius Seneca who extremely conveniently has survived being impaled on a sword and left for dead for hours; a factor that far from impressing you actually makes you roll your eyes a little at a lazy regurgitation of an element from the last book Without wanting to spoil it there is a large section of this book that Seneca mercifully doesn't feature in though he does reappear at the end with pretty significant rather unnecessary conseuences almost as if the author couldn't be arsed with him any and just wanted to use him to tie up a few looose endsOverall this is okay What few generally good parts in the book there are are lost amid an incredibly turgid pile of blandness The author is undeniably one who can craft a credible character but time and time again uses them so little or explores them so little that you end up wondering why he botheredOkay but a distinct plateau


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10 thoughts on “The Singing Sword

  1. Markus Markus says:

    The Singing Sword is a book of connections It is very much a seuel to The Skystone but it’s also the book truly beginning to turn The Camulod Chronicles into a work of Arthurian legendThe withdrawal of the Roman legions from Britain is as good as complete Varrus and Britannicus lead their little Colony into the future a legendary sword is forged and through intermarriage with the local Celts the two Romans are gifted with a grandson each one named Uther Pendragon the other MerlynThe second book in the series was a lot enjoyable than the first maybe particularly because it starts becoming recognizable as Arthurian fiction while retaining the historical realistic perspective from The Skystone The Singing Sword also had its tedious parts but overall it just made me and invested in the series

  2. Algernon (Darth Anyan) Algernon (Darth Anyan) says:

    More of a journal; less of a legal document I add my own personal thoughts and observations There are many of my opinions and thoughts mixed in with the events As I said it is a personal history and sometimes almost embarrassingly egotistical ‘The Singing Sword’ is the second half of a story that was probably too long to be published in a single volume It’s a safe bet that those readers who appreciated the first volume will not be disappointed in the second one and those who didn’t should start the journey there with ‘The Skystone’My opening uote is from Publius Varrus the main narrator of the book a professional Roman soldier who is also a very talented blacksmith and describes his decision to keep a journal about the progress of the ColonyThis Colony is a special project established and nurtured by the best friend and mentor of Publius Varrus the Senator Caius Britannicus This visionary has recognized the portents of the imminent collapse of the Roman Empire at the end of the fourth century AD and organized the farmers around his estate in southern Britain into a self supporting armed colony that will be capable of surviving the retreat of the Roman legions and the increasing attacks from Saxons Franks Picts and other assorted barbarians Publius and Varrus ally themselves with the local Celtic king whose family name of Pendragon should ring some bells for people familiar with a certain legendary heroThis second book is dealing mostly with the development of the Colony repelling marauders coming in war bands over the Channel re building the ancient fort on a hill about the main estate procuring iron that would soon be precious than gold flying under the radar of the Roman administrators who would treat the colonists as outlaws training their paramilitary forces and organizing an independent governing and legislative structure view spoiler including the use of a Round Table in Council hide spoiler

  3. Mark Halse Mark Halse says:

    With this third reading of THE SINGING SWORD I am reminded of all of the reasons that I love this series Deep and lovable characters sweeping storyline and twisted dramaIn this installment we follow ol' Publius Varrus as he truly creates the very roots of King Arthur The idea of mounted knights are created a round council is formed Uther and Merlin are fathered and most importantly Excalibur is bornThis book and series are a slow burn Possibly the slowest burning series that I've ever read but I love getting lost in an epic of this magnitude Envision Robin Hobb with details and a highly episodic narrative I feel that even the impatient could really enjoy this well written storyI do find the characters to be pompous and preachy at times but that is really just how Jack Whyte writes his characters They all have to be complete genius dickholes sometimes for them to accomplish the impossible HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

  4. Carrie Slager Carrie Slager says:

    I’m the sort of person that loves doing jigsaw puzzles which is part of the reason why I loved The Singing Sword It’s a lot like a jigsaw puzzle what with tiny barley recognizable pieces of the Arthurian legends slowly being dropped into place We got the outline or the edge pieces in the first book in A Dream of Eagles formerly known as The Camulod Chronicles The Skystone and now we’re starting to fill in the easy partsPublius is obviously mature than he was in the first book and it’s almost interesting to see this mature worldly point of view as he and Caius struggle to build up the Colony Their alliance with King Ullic the growing threat of foreign invaders reaching Roman territory and an old villain reappearing made The Singing Sword very exciting and an entertaining read Of course there are the bad parts of the novel as well and I would definitely not recommend it for people who are sensitive to gore Jack Whyte writes as Publius would have in the times and is less sensitive to the violence all around him Therefore it’s difficult for someone with modern views on violence to accept the ancient world for what it was but The Singing Sword feels all the authentic for thatNot only is Publius mature than when we left him at the end of The Skystone all of the other characters are mature Their newly acuired maturity does not mean that they’re boring or that they don’t have character arcs uite the opposite in fact Fans of the first book will love to see their favourite characters change even and will learn to love the new generation that helps bring the legend of Camelot closer to realityI give this book 55 stars

  5. Tim Mcdougall Tim Mcdougall says:

    Whyte starts with a great concept an alternative view of the Arthur mythos this time with Arthur's ancestors as Roman soldiers And he does some of the best battle scenes in the business He does his research choreographs them well and generates real tension when he's focusing hereSo why he decides to go on for hundreds of pages at a time while his main characters do nothing but extol the virtues of farming or the beauty of his wife or the virtues of working hard as a blacksmith is beyond me It doesn't feel like he did the research to make these sections interesting or that he really cares to and his characterizations are too flat to make these extended sections work To make it worse there is absolutely no tension in the plot for these sections I felt like I was just plowing through to get to the conclusion A tedious enough read for me at least that I dropped the series despite some recommendations from family

  6. Benjamin Thomas Benjamin Thomas says:

    The second book in the “Camulod Chronicles” picks up shortly after the events of the first book The Skystone It continues the tale of Caius Britannicus and Publius Varrus both great grandfathers of the future King Arthur of Briton as they continue to build the colony of Camulod during the turn of the 5th century AD when Rome was pulling out of Briton and leaving the Brits the Celts and other assorted peoples to deal with various invading groups such as the Saxons and the NorthmenI love the way this series is a truly accurate historical novel series at this point at least that also just happens to be related to the Arthurian legends As the colony of Camulod gets established we get to see major historical events and influences unfold For example due to the need for mobility in responding to threats the art of warfare using horses is advanced Rome was never known for its cavalry but now there is a need for well trained warriors on horses A breeding program is introduced to increase the size of the horses the stirrup is introduced and the swords are lengthened to allow use from horseback All of these developments are actual historical occurrences We also get to witness the first rough efforts to convert a Senate like council meeting where elitism prevails to a newer style of local government in the form of a round circle of chairs where all have an eual voice I think we all know where this will lead to in an Arthurian senseBut importantly this is a well told tale Just as in the first novel this is a first person account by Publius Varrus a former legionnaire partly crippled through a battle injury and now a master black smith One might correctly guess from the title that he is the eventual crafter of Excalibur His first person point of view lends a great perspective on bringing these great events down to the individual level and allowing the everyday life of families lovers builders etc to be as personal and emotional for the reader as it is for him Great and satisfying personal achievements are matched by great loss and even tragedy It is rare when a fictional novel brings a tear to my eye but this one managed to do itAll of these great historical shifts in thinking and techniue take many years The first two novels cover most of Caius and Publius’s long lives but it is inevitable that we move on I’m excited for the third book in the series The Eagles' Brood where I understand that Publius’s grandson takes over the first person account His name is Caius Merlyn Britannicus first cousin of Uther Pendragon

  7. Don Maker Don Maker says:

    Rather than the romantic fantastical versions of Camelot this is the story of how it all might have really come about This is book two of at least nine in the Camulod Chronicles and I have ordered books one and three after reading this Because the story begins at the tail end of the fourth century it is very much about the Roman influence on Britain and how the two cultures merged together as the Roman Empire was disintegrating It seems Mr Whyte did his research as the lifestyles and events seem authentic and all of the elements of the Arthurian legend come about in a very believable mannerThe characters are well drawn and fully developed and the action is interesting whether it involves a battle or a billows—the main character in this novel Publius Varrus becomes a blacksmith after retiring from the Roman legions and of course creates a marvelous sword he names Excalibur As a writer it was very impressive to me that Mr Whyte could maintain both interest and tension in fairly long descriptions of seemingly mundane things albeit he either immediately or eventually made clear how they tied into both the immediate story and the future legend There were a couple of long philosophical conversations that were off the main topic although they did relate to some of the sub plots but he managed to make them interesting as well at least to meIf you enjoy historical fiction lively portrayals of ancient periods especially England and revel in the Arthurian legend in particular I think you will love this series It is very slow in developing as is life itself but very rich in its detail and authenticity

  8. Heidi Heidi says:

    So the Chronicles of the Roman Preppers continues to be unintentionally hilarious as old war buddies band together to prepare for the coming of the Roman Apocalypse Still fairly entertaining although not much happens I would have given it 3 stars if I had not become weary of the women's roles in this story and totally offended by the way he describes gay men I haven't decided whether to continue my rereading of this series as prelude to finally finishing the last volumes or spend my time on something less hopelessly trapped in its own limited perspectives

  9. Barth Siemens Barth Siemens says:

    Gaius Publius Varrus the first person narrator lived a rich and varied life that he tells through this series by Jack Whyte If Commander Varrus has one fault it is that he halts his narration all too often for an exposition on this or that—often about his long held dream to smith a sword for the ages As a reader these tangents disrupts the flow and sidelines my suspension of disbeliefFor someone who said so much about smithing swords I was dismayed that he wanted me to accept that it was sharp from the cast—setting aside the likelihood of it turning out well from a mold at all

  10. Beorn Beorn says:

    Due to the rather weird unhelpful way the reissues are listed I am reading this as book two in the Legends Of Camelot series as that is how they work out chronologically in terms of the story arc so this book should only be read after 'The War Of The Celts'Don't get me wrong there are a few good things in this book but for the most part this is a remarkably tedious turgid affairIt says a lot about the mostly tepid feel of a book when a number of massacres drenched in blood and an invasion by barbarian Franks fail to lift the general feel of the book beyond woodenI won't go into too much detail on that front save ruining any of the plot but suffice to say that there will be a number of chapters where you'll gladly skip ahead entire paragraphs as it feels far like reading through a bureaucrat's take on Arthurian legend rather than an authors All red tape musings deliberations and wistful thinking and very little actionThere is also a pretty significant anachronism here in the authors adamant suggestion that the main protagonists invented the idea of cavalry using a longer sword instead of a spear when that method had already been adopted and used by imperial cavalry for over a century before the time period in which this book is set On top of that the author also makes the insinuation that the Celts living in what would later become Wales had no knowledge of longswords only using axes as weapons even though it's practically the most basic of common knowledge that the majority of barbarian tribes the Roman Empire went up against especially the latter ones who hadn't been co opted into the Roman army itself had used longswords for generationsIt is that double edged anachronism on top of an overall stodgy feel to the book that prevents me from being able to particularly praise the storyAside from the long tedious parts of the story dedicated to military planning or boredom inducing bureacracy the novel is still relatively easy to read and compelling enough to keep you ploughing throughThere's a rather farcical reappearance of the main protagonist from the last book Claudius Seneca who extremely conveniently has survived being impaled on a sword and left for dead for hours; a factor that far from impressing you actually makes you roll your eyes a little at a lazy regurgitation of an element from the last book Without wanting to spoil it there is a large section of this book that Seneca mercifully doesn't feature in though he does reappear at the end with pretty significant rather unnecessary conseuences almost as if the author couldn't be arsed with him any and just wanted to use him to tie up a few looose endsOverall this is okay What few generally good parts in the book there are are lost amid an incredibly turgid pile of blandness The author is undeniably one who can craft a credible character but time and time again uses them so little or explores them so little that you end up wondering why he botheredOkay but a distinct plateau

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