The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel ePUB Í Haunting of

The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel ePUB Í Haunting of


    Load results Apple Footer Apple Support a brigade of angels descending from heaven to The Haunting PDF \ fight beside the beleaguered British troops But can there be any truth to it?H G Wells, the most celebrated writer of his day—author of The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man—is dispatched to find out There, he finds an eerie Haunting of H Kindle Ó wasteland inhabited by the living, the dead, and those forever stranded somewhere in between…a noman’sland whose unhappy souls trail him home to London, where a deadly plot, one that could turn the tide of war, is rapidly unfoldingIn league with his young love, the reporter and suffragette Rebecca West, Wells must do battle with diabolical forces—secret agents and depraved occultists—to save his sanity, his country, and ultimately the world."/>
  • Kindle Edition
  • The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel
  • Robert Masello
  • 02 November 2017

10 thoughts on “The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel

  1. Kaitlin Kaitlin says:

    When H.G. Wells is sent to the frontlines in this World War I era novel, he comes home with a lot more than he could have ever guessed. We are talking ghosts. The Haunting of H.G. Wells is a standalone novel written by Robert Masello. When H.G. Wells is sent to the frontlines in order to gather information for a publication, meant to act as a morale booster for the country, he leaves everything in order. He leaves his wife at home, he leaves a young woman at his London flat, and he heads off. After things take a violent turn in the trenches, Wells returns only to find this young woman has a knack for getting into mischief, his wife is harboring an extremely dangerous secret, and on top of it all, Wells finds himself seeing ghosts at every turn. Can he work through the madness to help stop an outrageous attack that sounds like it came straight out of his science fiction novels?



    I have mixed feelings about this novel. For the most part I did really enjoy it. The writing style is fantastic. Robert Masello did a great job keeping with the language of the time and the pacing was excellent. I thoroughly enjoyed reading a fictional novel starring one of my favorite authors, and the balance between historical information and fiction is well done. I never once found myself bored or wishing for the plot to progress. However, I did find the side plot with his wife and the German soldier from the zeppelin crash unnecessary. It did not seem to pertain to the main plot regarding H.G. Wells and his efforts to stop the attack on England. I think that time could have been better spent within the main plot. I would have loved to see more of these ghostly figures that are haunting him, maybe given them a bit more of a backstory, or maybe have longer interactions with them. Now if the German soldier from the side plot were to make a comeback later in the novel and help Wells on his journey then it might have been more fitting.



    If you are a fan of war era fiction novels, then you would definitely enjoy this book. Despite its spooky title, there are very few paranormal elements involved. Any suspense is directly correlated to war related storylines. I would give it a rating of 3 out of 5 stars.


    Thank you to 47North and NetGalley for providing me a copy of this book to review.


  2. Milou Milou says:

    I have very mixed feelings about this book. There are parts I loved, and parts I really did not like.

    We follow HG Wells as he travels to the front to write a morale boosting story during WWI. There he discovers a plot against the British, and back home gets himself quite involved in saving king and country. We also follow Jane, his wife, who together with the local doctor hides a young German soldier in her attic.

    And I adored these parts of the book. Jane is just wonderful and I could easily read a book just about her. I also feel Robert caught HG very well (comparing it to other books I have read featuring the author). He has definitely done his research and you can feel that in many aspects of the story. The secret plot was sufficiently threatening and scary and cleverly linked to HG Wells. An excellent and very enjoyable read, if it had stayed with these plot lines.

    But then we get to the things I didn't like... Rebecca. Yes, I am well aware that HG had an, let's call it open marriage, and that Rebecca was a real person he had a relationship with. However, I don't feel why this needs to be such a big part of the book, overshadowing more interesting plot points. Adding to that, I really didn't like Rebecca. She was annoying, and I didn't find her relationship with HG believably written (even though I again know it is based on truth, I felt no chemistry). I ended up skimming her chapters, and could still follow the story just fine. 

    I would have preferred that her page time was given to the 'haunting', because as it is the title of this book is incredibly misleading. The actual haunting is a very small part of the book, and not explained at all. It left me incredibly confused. I would have been fine with it if it was PTSD. But then what are these ghouls? And what about the prologue? I am so confused!

    So I don't quite know if I would recommend this book. I really liked parts of it, but I have also never been so annoyed by a POV that I just skipped that character. The writing was good though, and some of the other books by this author sound very interesting to me so I might give those a go. I just don't quite know what to think of this one...


  3. Maranda Maranda says:

    Robert Masello seems to choose a famous individual to fill the pages of his novels that come across in an entertaining and fast paced format. I have picked up a few of Masello's other works and have enjoyed those also. H.G. Wells is the highlight in this story and has just the right amount of action, romance, and historical facts. A copy of this book was provided by 47 North via NetGalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion.


  4. Christi M Christi M says:

    I have found there is never an easy way to write a review for books I have mixed feelings about. This is one such book for me, where I found myself enjoying some parts and really disliking others.

    Set at the beginning years of WWI in 1914-1915, the main story begins when Churchill asks Wells to go to the front lines of the war. He needs Wells to go and find stories from the front that will inspire and encourage those back home. If you've seen any recent WWI movies showing the trenches and how they were structured, along with underground tunnels then you will have a good reference for this part of the story. It is here he meets various individuals and learns of their stories, both of which will remain with him for quite a while. Although shorter than I would have liked, this section was my favorite.

    Initially, it was the 'Haunting' part of the title that drew me to this book. I knew from the description that there was a secret plot against London, but for me that was secondary to the haunting piece of it. With this in mind, the story stars off great. The prologue opens up the story and immediately captured a tone I enjoy. But once the prologue was over the mood shifts and although the haunting of H.G. Wells does occur later in the story it never again captures the tone I had been expecting. But there were aspects of the haunting that I did enjoy, such as who the haunters were and how the sights and sounds he experienced played a role.

    One aspect of the story the author does a very good job of is introducing you to the world of Wells. We often look at certain time periods and will make assumptions on certain roles or ways of living. But here we get the opportunity to see a different aspect of this era by introducing us to the Fabian society or The Freewoman magazine. These organizations and others are historical and can be easily searched on using the Internet. Yet my mind is so accustomed to that post-Victorian era being a certain way that their progressiveness and free thinking was difficult to wrap my head around.

    Along those lines, one of my main struggles were with H.G. Wells himself along with Rebecca West. Prior to reading the story, I was unaware of how unfaithful he was in his marriage. Here we not only learn about Rebecca, but she soon becomes an integral part of the story. Perhaps I am too old-fashioned or perhaps I never could adjust to how progressive this was for that era, but I did struggle with their relationship and with Rebecca getting such a large story. However, H.G.'s wife also has a role too for a few chapters. I'm not very sure what her story line brought to the table as a whole, except to show a contrast to H.G.'s story in France. He is at the front where men are fighting for their lives, but while there a war in France the war is also at the home front too.

    The story is well-written and provides good context to a very famous author and his life. I also learned quite a few things I didn't know about this time period prior to reading it. But even though there are parts of this book I enjoyed, I'm not sure I can necessarily recommend it.


  5. Dubi Dubi says:

    H.G. Wells is sent to the trenches of the First World War by his friend Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, to write morale-boosting reports on the war effort. He witnesses the horrors of the war firsthand, is nearly killed by an explosion, but is saved by a group of multinational deserters living in abandoned tunnels. One of them, a former German officer, gives him a notebook that details a bioterror plot against London.

    Returning to London, he and Rebecca West, a feminist journalist and his latest extramarital paramour, try to figure out the plot and identify the terrorist. He is helped along the way by premonitions provided by periodic visits from the ghosts of soldiers he met in the trenches who have since died. Meanwhile, back at his country house, his wife is hiding an injured German soldier who survived a Zeppelin crash.

    Robert Masello specializes in these kind of historical novels with supernatural elements, some of his other novels centering on Albert Einstein and Robert Louis Stevenson. Wells is well known, as of course is Churchill. Rebecca West was also a real-life person who had an affair with Wells and was an accomplished writer in her own right. Also among the cast of supporting characters are other historical personalities, like the notorious Aleister Crowley (although the real-life Crowley had relocated to America by the time World War I broke out).

    The device of having Wells's PTSD manifest itself in the form of ghosts of soldiers works well. It is in fact the best thing about the story, since their premonitions invariable steer Wells in the right direction. The Haunting of H.G. Wells is a rewarding read, a quick and entertaining read. It even manages to hit upon some deeper issues about gender equality, the horrors of technological warfare, and in the current environment of a viral pandemic (even though it was written well before this outbreak), the terror of biological agents.

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for access to an advance reading copy.


  6. Jamie Jack Jamie Jack says:

    Not Really About the Haunting...

    I'll admit I was drawn to this book by the title, as I do like stories with a paranormal element. Despite its prominence in the title, this aspect was downplayed, to the novel’s detriment. Before moving on to other things that bothered me, I have to say that the author has an excellent writing style. It is smooth and easy to read, and clearly, the author has done his research about H. G. Wells and World War I. It was fun to see other real people, like Winston Churchill, incorporated into the story as well.

    I thought, though, that there was perhaps too much going on, particularly with subplots and emphases that detracted from the main plot. I didn't see much point to Wells’ wife Jane’s subplot with the Zeppelin crash survivor. I also felt like too much of the story was told from Rebecca's/Cicily’s viewpoint that didn't add to the main thrust of the story. I know she was actually a part of H. G. Wells’ life, an extramarital relationship, but I didn't sense a spark between them that I like to see in a romantic subplot. Just a little would have been nice since she was so much a part of the book. I didn't find her character particularly likable anyway, and a believable romantic relationship might have helped or at least cemented her place within the novel. Truly, I would have preferred that the time spent on these subplots and distractions was used more on the “haunting” aspect. Those moments certainly added interest and provided direction when they showed up. Because of these issues, I can't really say that I enjoyed this story, but I did like the author's writing style and may check out his other books to see if they keep the good aspects in this book without its pitfalls.

    I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review.


  7. Scott Nickels Scott Nickels says:

    “The Haunting of H. G. Wells” by Robert Masello attracted me by its creativity and inventiveness. The novel also challenged me due to its over-the-top creativity and inventiveness. I suspect that this book would have “jazzed” me in my teens and twenties; however, as an old codger having just reached senior citizen official status I found myself first picking up then putting down then again picking up this Advanced Readers Copy supplied by NetGalley.
    Masello has written a fast-paced novel of suspense and takes some famous folks out of history, namely Winston Churchill and H.G. Wells, and puts them into the horror of the front lines of World War 1. While in the midst of the war Wells witnesses the nightmares of battles and these trigger ghostly premonitions that follow him upon his return to London. I shan’t give away the major plot points: there is a young lover who comes alongside Wells to help decipher a notebook with mysteries within. Enjoy the read and strap in for the wild ride!


  8. Wyetha Wyetha says:

    -----Thanks to Net Galley for providing this book!-----

    The Haunting of H.G. Wells wouldn't be a typical book for me, however, haunting was in the title (Yes I'm a sucker for the supernatural).  Even though the book was well written, it moved like molasses for me.  The point was to set the story and the scene for that period, as Wells was haunted by his transgressions and time spent on the Western Front.

    When the story moved towards the war my receptors kicked in and my eyes glazed over as the book moved even slower for me.  It did pick up towards the end, as the real plot emerged, but there were other areas that I was unsure about or wondered why they were included, as they didn't help to connect the story for me.  

    All in all this is a good story and a great read if you like period pieces about the war.


  9. Kevin Kevin says:

    I stopped at 68% when the only character I cared about was needlessly killed.
    It’s fiction set during World War I in England and also briefly the Belgian front, with historical figures such as Churchill in contrived situations.
    The book starts appealingly with a fantasy of Saint George sending help to the UK soldiers who are hopelessly outnumbered. Then it splinters into several tracks: sci-fi writer Wells, his wife left at home, a young woman reporter, a teen German soldier in hiding in the English countryside, and a German(?) scientist working on a mad plot.
    Lots of appealing characters are killed, and it seems the reward for kindness is pain or death. There are very explicit details of the carnage: “The second shot exploded the teddy bear he had clutched to his chest.”
    Wells sees ghosts, but by then I had lost interest.


  10. Florence Florence says:

    The more you read the book and get acquainted with all the characters, you just cannot believe your luck ! I wish that the story would not end , that I could go back to more adventures ... The introduction sets the action during the first world war, and next we embark on a journey through fears, love, adventures, spiritism, and heroism. We learn about great figures and we see the everyday combat of people like you and me. The baddies are highly convincing. I just enjoyed reading every single sentences and wish for more. Prepare to sit on the edge of your seat ... I'm definitely going to read more books from Robert Masello, I am so happy to have discovered this book and author thankfully to Net Galley.
    I have already highly recommended this book and author.


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The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel[EPUB] ✺ The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel ✽ Robert Masello – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk A plot against England that even the genius of H G Wells could not have imagined It’s The Great War grips the world—and from the Western Front a strange story emerges…a story of St George and of H PDF/EPUB ä A plot against England that even the genius of H G Wells could not have imagined It’sThe Great War grips the world—and from the Western Front a strange story emerges…a story of St George and a brigade of angels descending from heaven to The Haunting PDF \ fight beside the beleaguered British troops But can there be any truth to it?H G Wells, the most celebrated writer of his day—author of The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man—is dispatched to find out There, he finds an eerie Haunting of H Kindle Ó wasteland inhabited by the living, the dead, and those forever stranded somewhere in between…a noman’sland whose unhappy souls trail him home to London, where a deadly plot, one that could turn the tide of war, is rapidly unfoldingIn league with his young love, the reporter and suffragette Rebecca West, Wells must do battle with diabolical forces—secret agents and depraved occultists—to save his sanity, his country, and ultimately the world.


About the Author: Robert Masello

of H PDF/EPUB ä Robert Masello is an award winning journalist, TV writer, and the bestselling author of many novels and nonfiction books In addition to his most recent book, THE HAUNTING OF HG WELLS, he has written the Kindle bestseller, THE EINSTEIN PROPHECY, and The Haunting PDF \ many other popular thrillers, including THE JEKYLL REVELATION, THE NIGHT CROSSING, BLOOD AND ICE, THE MEDUSA AMULET, and THE ROMANOV CROS.


10 thoughts on “The Haunting of H G Wells: A Novel

  1. Kaitlin Kaitlin says:

    When H.G. Wells is sent to the frontlines in this World War I era novel, he comes home with a lot more than he could have ever guessed. We are talking ghosts. The Haunting of H.G. Wells is a standalone novel written by Robert Masello. When H.G. Wells is sent to the frontlines in order to gather information for a publication, meant to act as a morale booster for the country, he leaves everything in order. He leaves his wife at home, he leaves a young woman at his London flat, and he heads off. After things take a violent turn in the trenches, Wells returns only to find this young woman has a knack for getting into mischief, his wife is harboring an extremely dangerous secret, and on top of it all, Wells finds himself seeing ghosts at every turn. Can he work through the madness to help stop an outrageous attack that sounds like it came straight out of his science fiction novels?



    I have mixed feelings about this novel. For the most part I did really enjoy it. The writing style is fantastic. Robert Masello did a great job keeping with the language of the time and the pacing was excellent. I thoroughly enjoyed reading a fictional novel starring one of my favorite authors, and the balance between historical information and fiction is well done. I never once found myself bored or wishing for the plot to progress. However, I did find the side plot with his wife and the German soldier from the zeppelin crash unnecessary. It did not seem to pertain to the main plot regarding H.G. Wells and his efforts to stop the attack on England. I think that time could have been better spent within the main plot. I would have loved to see more of these ghostly figures that are haunting him, maybe given them a bit more of a backstory, or maybe have longer interactions with them. Now if the German soldier from the side plot were to make a comeback later in the novel and help Wells on his journey then it might have been more fitting.



    If you are a fan of war era fiction novels, then you would definitely enjoy this book. Despite its spooky title, there are very few paranormal elements involved. Any suspense is directly correlated to war related storylines. I would give it a rating of 3 out of 5 stars.


    Thank you to 47North and NetGalley for providing me a copy of this book to review.

  2. Milou Milou says:

    I have very mixed feelings about this book. There are parts I loved, and parts I really did not like.

    We follow HG Wells as he travels to the front to write a morale boosting story during WWI. There he discovers a plot against the British, and back home gets himself quite involved in saving king and country. We also follow Jane, his wife, who together with the local doctor hides a young German soldier in her attic.

    And I adored these parts of the book. Jane is just wonderful and I could easily read a book just about her. I also feel Robert caught HG very well (comparing it to other books I have read featuring the author). He has definitely done his research and you can feel that in many aspects of the story. The secret plot was sufficiently threatening and scary and cleverly linked to HG Wells. An excellent and very enjoyable read, if it had stayed with these plot lines.

    But then we get to the things I didn't like... Rebecca. Yes, I am well aware that HG had an, let's call it open marriage, and that Rebecca was a real person he had a relationship with. However, I don't feel why this needs to be such a big part of the book, overshadowing more interesting plot points. Adding to that, I really didn't like Rebecca. She was annoying, and I didn't find her relationship with HG believably written (even though I again know it is based on truth, I felt no chemistry). I ended up skimming her chapters, and could still follow the story just fine. 

    I would have preferred that her page time was given to the 'haunting', because as it is the title of this book is incredibly misleading. The actual haunting is a very small part of the book, and not explained at all. It left me incredibly confused. I would have been fine with it if it was PTSD. But then what are these ghouls? And what about the prologue? I am so confused!

    So I don't quite know if I would recommend this book. I really liked parts of it, but I have also never been so annoyed by a POV that I just skipped that character. The writing was good though, and some of the other books by this author sound very interesting to me so I might give those a go. I just don't quite know what to think of this one...

  3. Maranda Maranda says:

    Robert Masello seems to choose a famous individual to fill the pages of his novels that come across in an entertaining and fast paced format. I have picked up a few of Masello's other works and have enjoyed those also. H.G. Wells is the highlight in this story and has just the right amount of action, romance, and historical facts. A copy of this book was provided by 47 North via NetGalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion.

  4. Christi M Christi M says:

    I have found there is never an easy way to write a review for books I have mixed feelings about. This is one such book for me, where I found myself enjoying some parts and really disliking others.

    Set at the beginning years of WWI in 1914-1915, the main story begins when Churchill asks Wells to go to the front lines of the war. He needs Wells to go and find stories from the front that will inspire and encourage those back home. If you've seen any recent WWI movies showing the trenches and how they were structured, along with underground tunnels then you will have a good reference for this part of the story. It is here he meets various individuals and learns of their stories, both of which will remain with him for quite a while. Although shorter than I would have liked, this section was my favorite.

    Initially, it was the 'Haunting' part of the title that drew me to this book. I knew from the description that there was a secret plot against London, but for me that was secondary to the haunting piece of it. With this in mind, the story stars off great. The prologue opens up the story and immediately captured a tone I enjoy. But once the prologue was over the mood shifts and although the haunting of H.G. Wells does occur later in the story it never again captures the tone I had been expecting. But there were aspects of the haunting that I did enjoy, such as who the haunters were and how the sights and sounds he experienced played a role.

    One aspect of the story the author does a very good job of is introducing you to the world of Wells. We often look at certain time periods and will make assumptions on certain roles or ways of living. But here we get the opportunity to see a different aspect of this era by introducing us to the Fabian society or The Freewoman magazine. These organizations and others are historical and can be easily searched on using the Internet. Yet my mind is so accustomed to that post-Victorian era being a certain way that their progressiveness and free thinking was difficult to wrap my head around.

    Along those lines, one of my main struggles were with H.G. Wells himself along with Rebecca West. Prior to reading the story, I was unaware of how unfaithful he was in his marriage. Here we not only learn about Rebecca, but she soon becomes an integral part of the story. Perhaps I am too old-fashioned or perhaps I never could adjust to how progressive this was for that era, but I did struggle with their relationship and with Rebecca getting such a large story. However, H.G.'s wife also has a role too for a few chapters. I'm not very sure what her story line brought to the table as a whole, except to show a contrast to H.G.'s story in France. He is at the front where men are fighting for their lives, but while there a war in France the war is also at the home front too.

    The story is well-written and provides good context to a very famous author and his life. I also learned quite a few things I didn't know about this time period prior to reading it. But even though there are parts of this book I enjoyed, I'm not sure I can necessarily recommend it.

  5. Dubi Dubi says:

    H.G. Wells is sent to the trenches of the First World War by his friend Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, to write morale-boosting reports on the war effort. He witnesses the horrors of the war firsthand, is nearly killed by an explosion, but is saved by a group of multinational deserters living in abandoned tunnels. One of them, a former German officer, gives him a notebook that details a bioterror plot against London.

    Returning to London, he and Rebecca West, a feminist journalist and his latest extramarital paramour, try to figure out the plot and identify the terrorist. He is helped along the way by premonitions provided by periodic visits from the ghosts of soldiers he met in the trenches who have since died. Meanwhile, back at his country house, his wife is hiding an injured German soldier who survived a Zeppelin crash.

    Robert Masello specializes in these kind of historical novels with supernatural elements, some of his other novels centering on Albert Einstein and Robert Louis Stevenson. Wells is well known, as of course is Churchill. Rebecca West was also a real-life person who had an affair with Wells and was an accomplished writer in her own right. Also among the cast of supporting characters are other historical personalities, like the notorious Aleister Crowley (although the real-life Crowley had relocated to America by the time World War I broke out).

    The device of having Wells's PTSD manifest itself in the form of ghosts of soldiers works well. It is in fact the best thing about the story, since their premonitions invariable steer Wells in the right direction. The Haunting of H.G. Wells is a rewarding read, a quick and entertaining read. It even manages to hit upon some deeper issues about gender equality, the horrors of technological warfare, and in the current environment of a viral pandemic (even though it was written well before this outbreak), the terror of biological agents.

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for access to an advance reading copy.

  6. Jamie Jack Jamie Jack says:

    Not Really About the Haunting...

    I'll admit I was drawn to this book by the title, as I do like stories with a paranormal element. Despite its prominence in the title, this aspect was downplayed, to the novel’s detriment. Before moving on to other things that bothered me, I have to say that the author has an excellent writing style. It is smooth and easy to read, and clearly, the author has done his research about H. G. Wells and World War I. It was fun to see other real people, like Winston Churchill, incorporated into the story as well.

    I thought, though, that there was perhaps too much going on, particularly with subplots and emphases that detracted from the main plot. I didn't see much point to Wells’ wife Jane’s subplot with the Zeppelin crash survivor. I also felt like too much of the story was told from Rebecca's/Cicily’s viewpoint that didn't add to the main thrust of the story. I know she was actually a part of H. G. Wells’ life, an extramarital relationship, but I didn't sense a spark between them that I like to see in a romantic subplot. Just a little would have been nice since she was so much a part of the book. I didn't find her character particularly likable anyway, and a believable romantic relationship might have helped or at least cemented her place within the novel. Truly, I would have preferred that the time spent on these subplots and distractions was used more on the “haunting” aspect. Those moments certainly added interest and provided direction when they showed up. Because of these issues, I can't really say that I enjoyed this story, but I did like the author's writing style and may check out his other books to see if they keep the good aspects in this book without its pitfalls.

    I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review.

  7. Scott Nickels Scott Nickels says:

    “The Haunting of H. G. Wells” by Robert Masello attracted me by its creativity and inventiveness. The novel also challenged me due to its over-the-top creativity and inventiveness. I suspect that this book would have “jazzed” me in my teens and twenties; however, as an old codger having just reached senior citizen official status I found myself first picking up then putting down then again picking up this Advanced Readers Copy supplied by NetGalley.
    Masello has written a fast-paced novel of suspense and takes some famous folks out of history, namely Winston Churchill and H.G. Wells, and puts them into the horror of the front lines of World War 1. While in the midst of the war Wells witnesses the nightmares of battles and these trigger ghostly premonitions that follow him upon his return to London. I shan’t give away the major plot points: there is a young lover who comes alongside Wells to help decipher a notebook with mysteries within. Enjoy the read and strap in for the wild ride!

  8. Wyetha Wyetha says:

    -----Thanks to Net Galley for providing this book!-----

    The Haunting of H.G. Wells wouldn't be a typical book for me, however, haunting was in the title (Yes I'm a sucker for the supernatural).  Even though the book was well written, it moved like molasses for me.  The point was to set the story and the scene for that period, as Wells was haunted by his transgressions and time spent on the Western Front.

    When the story moved towards the war my receptors kicked in and my eyes glazed over as the book moved even slower for me.  It did pick up towards the end, as the real plot emerged, but there were other areas that I was unsure about or wondered why they were included, as they didn't help to connect the story for me.  

    All in all this is a good story and a great read if you like period pieces about the war.

  9. Kevin Kevin says:

    I stopped at 68% when the only character I cared about was needlessly killed.
    It’s fiction set during World War I in England and also briefly the Belgian front, with historical figures such as Churchill in contrived situations.
    The book starts appealingly with a fantasy of Saint George sending help to the UK soldiers who are hopelessly outnumbered. Then it splinters into several tracks: sci-fi writer Wells, his wife left at home, a young woman reporter, a teen German soldier in hiding in the English countryside, and a German(?) scientist working on a mad plot.
    Lots of appealing characters are killed, and it seems the reward for kindness is pain or death. There are very explicit details of the carnage: “The second shot exploded the teddy bear he had clutched to his chest.”
    Wells sees ghosts, but by then I had lost interest.

  10. Florence Florence says:

    The more you read the book and get acquainted with all the characters, you just cannot believe your luck ! I wish that the story would not end , that I could go back to more adventures ... The introduction sets the action during the first world war, and next we embark on a journey through fears, love, adventures, spiritism, and heroism. We learn about great figures and we see the everyday combat of people like you and me. The baddies are highly convincing. I just enjoyed reading every single sentences and wish for more. Prepare to sit on the edge of your seat ... I'm definitely going to read more books from Robert Masello, I am so happy to have discovered this book and author thankfully to Net Galley.
    I have already highly recommended this book and author.

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