Giants of the Frost PDF Æ Giants of PDF \

Giants of the Frost PDF Æ Giants of PDF \


Giants of the Frost ❰Download❯ ➽ Giants of the Frost Author Kim Wilkins – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Taking a job on an isolated island in the Sea of Norway, scientist Victoria Scott wants a quiet place to finish her doctoral thesis But Victoria isn't prepared for the strange shadows outside her cabi Taking a job on an isolated island in the Sea of Norway, scientist Victoria Scott wants a quiet Giants of PDF \ place to finish her doctoral thesis But Victoria isn't prepared for the strange shadows outside her cabin window, the rumors of a murderous hag who sucks one's soul during sleep, and the tales of mythic monsters lurking in the forest More frightening than the islands nightmarish mysteries: to Victoria, everything is hauntingly familiarWhen an enigmatic stranger appears on the island, Victoria's sense of foreboding peaks For she learns that they are connected by a conflict centuries oldone that can end only with her death.

    Giants of the Frost PDF Æ Giants of PDF \ the forest More frightening than the islands nightmarish mysteries: to Victoria, everything is hauntingly familiarWhen an enigmatic stranger appears on the island, Victoria's sense of foreboding peaks For she learns that they are connected by a conflict centuries oldone that can end only with her death."/>
  • Paperback
  • 531 pages
  • Giants of the Frost
  • Kim Wilkins
  • English
  • 28 June 2019
  • 9780446617284

10 thoughts on “Giants of the Frost

  1. Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books) Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books) says:

    Giants of the Frost turned out to be a slow read, but it was a very good book. I think that the use of Norse mythology was well done. I appreciate how Ms. Wilkins took Norse mythology and folklore and created something novel with these elements as a basis.

    Although it took me a while to get sucked into the romantic aspects, admittedly a big part of this book, I enjoyed reading about the characters: Victoria, Vidar, Aud, and Loki, whose fates are entwined rather deeply. I also appreciated the secondary cast of characters, the norns (three sisters who weave the fates for the Aesir), Skripi (a forest wight who is a lot of help to Victoria), and Victoria's coworkers, especially Gunnar (who is a very good friend and source of information about Norse myths to Victoria), to name a few. It was interesting to see Victoria's journey from grounded, almost boneheaded skepticism (she calls herself a fundamental atheist), to a woman who believes that she is the reincarnated lover of the son of Odin. Loki was quite the scene stealer. Ms. Wilkins managed to take this scheming, perpetually joking and stealing trickster of Norse lore, and make him into an appealing antihero who definitely got my interest. Aud, who is the bondmaid of Vidar, really earned my sympathy. She made a bargain out of a mother's love that cost her a thousand years and is in love with Vidar, although she knows it will never be returned. I liked that the characters were complex, realistically selfish in their desires at times, and not always motivated to do the right thing; yet they did show good qualities that made me want the best for them.

    Ms. Wilkins is a very good writer, drawing vivid pictures in my mind. My favorite parts were the retelling of Vidar's struggle to be reunited with his love. It reminded me of fairy and folktales in which a character goes on a quest and suffers greatly, for that which is their heart's desire. I admit that there were parts where my interest waned, but I was glad I kept reading, especially when it got to the more interesting parts with Vidar's quest. Although I was a bit ambivalent about the fated love aspect of this story (more from the execution since I normally love that in a romance), I admit that by the end of the book, I was crying and hoping that Victoria and Vidar would get their chance to be together and happy.

    I didn't quite know what to expect with this book. I picked it up because of my interest in Norse mythology, and I'm glad I did. This book was expertly crafted, with gratifying depths of complexity; a rich tapestry woven from the threads of identifiably human emotion--both good and bad--and fascinating lore and legend. I'll definitely be reading more from this author.

  2. Echo Echo says:

    Of the books I've read so far this year, this is one of my favorites. The characters were amazing, the story was so intriguing I didn't want to put it down, and the writing was absolutely beautiful. I would definitely recommend this book to my friends who enjoy fantasy novels.

  3. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    DNF at 10%. This is a romance disguised as an actual story with smart characters and interesting mythology. I don't care about predestined, reincarnated blah, even with a skeptic female scientist as the main character. Actually, Victoria Scott (seriously? her name sounds like she should be a gothic romance writer from the 60s) apparently hates other women and only sees men as potential mates or creepers. Nor does she seem to have any interest in the geophysics she's apparently getting her PhD in. Look, I totally understand grad school burnout, but the fact that she finds a guy who wears musty sweaters more attractive than the geophysics of the cool remote island she's working on kind of floors me.

    Side rant: I reeaaally don't like the way this character is a scientist mostly because it was needed to get her out to said remote island for the romantic plot to work. Why not make her the ship's cook, in that case? It's possible to write interesting, convincing scientist characters whose curiosity and okay, borderline obsessiveness, are major plot drivers (ahem, Annihilation), but you definitely won't find one in Giants of the Frost.

    I am thoroughly unimpressed in less than 1/10th of the book. Which is almost impressive in itself.

  4. Jessi Jessi says:

    Kim Wilkins is one of my new favorite authors. My sister recommended her books years ago and I didn't get around to reading them until now.

    I enjoyed Giants of the Frost even more than The Autumn Castle because the main characters were smarter and thus more likable. Wilkins is very good at giving all of her characters depth. The plot moved along at an excellent pace. I loved the ties to Norse mythology. There were many interesting creatures, places, people, and items in this one because a good portion of it takes place in another realm.

    I like the creepy elements Wilkins brings to her writing, but I couldn't read it at night, during the first eight or so chapters. I still shudder thinking about it.

  5. Savannah Savannah says:

    The prose is lifeless, even when the protagonists claim to be overwrought. Much talking about emotions; not so much conveying them to the reader. Too much plot tension; not enough plot. Yawn.

    Really, the only reason my eyes were exposed to all of the pages was flip*flip*flip.

    For someone who likes the tedious genre of folktale-inspired leaden re-enactment, this will be just fine. And while it's a romance, the sex is inexplicit enough to feel okay handing the book over to any but the most sheltered of teens--it's definitely much more on the romance and less on the physical.

  6. Sarah Sarah says:

    In thirty-five pages, there was 1) a love triangle revealed, wherein one of the possible couplings is entirely unlikely. 2) the words two defenseless women were used un-ironically. 3) despite claims of being entirely uninterested in love, the main character knows the eligibility of all the men, despite 4) all of the women hate her and all the men want her. I am officially out. Thirty-five pages was all it took-- even Norse mythology isn't worth this poorly disguised Twilight crap.

  7. Elizabeth Mueller Elizabeth Mueller says:

    I really loved this book. Kim is so good at creating a world and making it real. I cried. I laughed. I vouched for my favorite characters. This book left me feeling good.

    This is my second time I've read it.

  8. Julie Davis Julie Davis says:

    Reviewed originally in 2009 for SFFaudio - see below.

    =============

    Fleeing a failed engagement and mother who makes life decisions based on a psychic’s predictions, skeptic Victoria Scott joins a weather team on a Scandinavian island. Harassed by insomnia and her unpredictable boss, she writes off her dreams of a breath-sucking hag and forest creature made of twigs as nightmares. Eventually, however, she discovers that these creatures are real and possibly the least of those she may encounter.

    The island is actually Midgard, a gate between our world and that of the old Nordic god, Asgard. The book alternately tells Victoria’s story and that of Vidar, a son of Odin, who has been waiting a thousand years for Victoria to be born. In Vidar’s world we meet, among others, his bondmaid Aud, who tells much of the story, and his cousin Loki, trickster god of the Norse pantheon.

    At first, Victoria is extremely shallow and self-absorbed, especially in her constant worries that any kind man has designs upon her. However, as the story unfolds and mythological elements gradually are incorporated, this feeling is lessened. My foreboding that this story was simply a typical romance was relieved completely when Aud’s and Vidar’s voices began to be heard. At that point the story became more intricate and took on weight and depth. By the last third of the book, I was on the edge of my seat wondering how the destiny of the two star-crossed lovers could possibly have the happy ending that I desired. Although such questions drive the story forward, much of the story’s true strength comes from Wilkins’ almost poetic incorporation of accurate Norse mythology and weather science.

    Narrator Edwina Wren delivers the story in either English or Scandinavian accents as the story requires. Her performance is compelling, especially when depicting Aud and Vidar. Transitions from one section to another are indicated with music which is welcome in helping the listener make the necessary mental switch in a book that has many points of view. This is an extremely pleasing audio book overall and Wren is a narrator to seek out in the future.

  9. Jo Jo says:

    This is as much a romance as a thriller or a mystery. I loved every moment of it, and fell in love with Vidar in a way I wouldn't have throught possible.

    I loved the intertwined threads of plots and fates, the cuts between Asgard and Earth, and the stories of passion gone in unforeseen directions.

    As I was reading, I found myself growing every more concerned about the ending. It seemed impossible that the story could end happily, but I was concerned that a tragic ending would make me feel that the entire book had been pointless. I needn't have worried. Wilkins delivers a beautifully considered, authentic and (most of all) satisfying conclusion to what I would consider a love story of the ages.

    I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in historical fiction, historical romance and Norse themed tales.

  10. Kristīne Kristīne says:

    I got as far as the middle and just had to say no and mark as dnf.

    The premise was good, the characters were compelling at first but the more I read the less I enjoyed it. and to be honest I didn't expect it to get so frustrating to deal with, not just the characters, but plot wise some things were not well executed.

    I got so tired of waiting for Victoria and Vidar to meet and when they did it turned out to be really disappointing.

    The switching point of views didn't help the matter either.

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10 thoughts on “Giants of the Frost

  1. Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books) Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books) says:

    Giants of the Frost turned out to be a slow read, but it was a very good book. I think that the use of Norse mythology was well done. I appreciate how Ms. Wilkins took Norse mythology and folklore and created something novel with these elements as a basis.

    Although it took me a while to get sucked into the romantic aspects, admittedly a big part of this book, I enjoyed reading about the characters: Victoria, Vidar, Aud, and Loki, whose fates are entwined rather deeply. I also appreciated the secondary cast of characters, the norns (three sisters who weave the fates for the Aesir), Skripi (a forest wight who is a lot of help to Victoria), and Victoria's coworkers, especially Gunnar (who is a very good friend and source of information about Norse myths to Victoria), to name a few. It was interesting to see Victoria's journey from grounded, almost boneheaded skepticism (she calls herself a fundamental atheist), to a woman who believes that she is the reincarnated lover of the son of Odin. Loki was quite the scene stealer. Ms. Wilkins managed to take this scheming, perpetually joking and stealing trickster of Norse lore, and make him into an appealing antihero who definitely got my interest. Aud, who is the bondmaid of Vidar, really earned my sympathy. She made a bargain out of a mother's love that cost her a thousand years and is in love with Vidar, although she knows it will never be returned. I liked that the characters were complex, realistically selfish in their desires at times, and not always motivated to do the right thing; yet they did show good qualities that made me want the best for them.

    Ms. Wilkins is a very good writer, drawing vivid pictures in my mind. My favorite parts were the retelling of Vidar's struggle to be reunited with his love. It reminded me of fairy and folktales in which a character goes on a quest and suffers greatly, for that which is their heart's desire. I admit that there were parts where my interest waned, but I was glad I kept reading, especially when it got to the more interesting parts with Vidar's quest. Although I was a bit ambivalent about the fated love aspect of this story (more from the execution since I normally love that in a romance), I admit that by the end of the book, I was crying and hoping that Victoria and Vidar would get their chance to be together and happy.

    I didn't quite know what to expect with this book. I picked it up because of my interest in Norse mythology, and I'm glad I did. This book was expertly crafted, with gratifying depths of complexity; a rich tapestry woven from the threads of identifiably human emotion--both good and bad--and fascinating lore and legend. I'll definitely be reading more from this author.

  2. Echo Echo says:

    Of the books I've read so far this year, this is one of my favorites. The characters were amazing, the story was so intriguing I didn't want to put it down, and the writing was absolutely beautiful. I would definitely recommend this book to my friends who enjoy fantasy novels.

  3. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    DNF at 10%. This is a romance disguised as an actual story with smart characters and interesting mythology. I don't care about predestined, reincarnated blah, even with a skeptic female scientist as the main character. Actually, Victoria Scott (seriously? her name sounds like she should be a gothic romance writer from the 60s) apparently hates other women and only sees men as potential mates or creepers. Nor does she seem to have any interest in the geophysics she's apparently getting her PhD in. Look, I totally understand grad school burnout, but the fact that she finds a guy who wears musty sweaters more attractive than the geophysics of the cool remote island she's working on kind of floors me.

    Side rant: I reeaaally don't like the way this character is a scientist mostly because it was needed to get her out to said remote island for the romantic plot to work. Why not make her the ship's cook, in that case? It's possible to write interesting, convincing scientist characters whose curiosity and okay, borderline obsessiveness, are major plot drivers (ahem, Annihilation), but you definitely won't find one in Giants of the Frost.

    I am thoroughly unimpressed in less than 1/10th of the book. Which is almost impressive in itself.

  4. Jessi Jessi says:

    Kim Wilkins is one of my new favorite authors. My sister recommended her books years ago and I didn't get around to reading them until now.

    I enjoyed Giants of the Frost even more than The Autumn Castle because the main characters were smarter and thus more likable. Wilkins is very good at giving all of her characters depth. The plot moved along at an excellent pace. I loved the ties to Norse mythology. There were many interesting creatures, places, people, and items in this one because a good portion of it takes place in another realm.

    I like the creepy elements Wilkins brings to her writing, but I couldn't read it at night, during the first eight or so chapters. I still shudder thinking about it.

  5. Savannah Savannah says:

    The prose is lifeless, even when the protagonists claim to be overwrought. Much talking about emotions; not so much conveying them to the reader. Too much plot tension; not enough plot. Yawn.

    Really, the only reason my eyes were exposed to all of the pages was flip*flip*flip.

    For someone who likes the tedious genre of folktale-inspired leaden re-enactment, this will be just fine. And while it's a romance, the sex is inexplicit enough to feel okay handing the book over to any but the most sheltered of teens--it's definitely much more on the romance and less on the physical.

  6. Sarah Sarah says:

    In thirty-five pages, there was 1) a love triangle revealed, wherein one of the possible couplings is entirely unlikely. 2) the words two defenseless women were used un-ironically. 3) despite claims of being entirely uninterested in love, the main character knows the eligibility of all the men, despite 4) all of the women hate her and all the men want her. I am officially out. Thirty-five pages was all it took-- even Norse mythology isn't worth this poorly disguised Twilight crap.

  7. Elizabeth Mueller Elizabeth Mueller says:

    I really loved this book. Kim is so good at creating a world and making it real. I cried. I laughed. I vouched for my favorite characters. This book left me feeling good.

    This is my second time I've read it.

  8. Julie Davis Julie Davis says:

    Reviewed originally in 2009 for SFFaudio - see below.

    =============

    Fleeing a failed engagement and mother who makes life decisions based on a psychic’s predictions, skeptic Victoria Scott joins a weather team on a Scandinavian island. Harassed by insomnia and her unpredictable boss, she writes off her dreams of a breath-sucking hag and forest creature made of twigs as nightmares. Eventually, however, she discovers that these creatures are real and possibly the least of those she may encounter.

    The island is actually Midgard, a gate between our world and that of the old Nordic god, Asgard. The book alternately tells Victoria’s story and that of Vidar, a son of Odin, who has been waiting a thousand years for Victoria to be born. In Vidar’s world we meet, among others, his bondmaid Aud, who tells much of the story, and his cousin Loki, trickster god of the Norse pantheon.

    At first, Victoria is extremely shallow and self-absorbed, especially in her constant worries that any kind man has designs upon her. However, as the story unfolds and mythological elements gradually are incorporated, this feeling is lessened. My foreboding that this story was simply a typical romance was relieved completely when Aud’s and Vidar’s voices began to be heard. At that point the story became more intricate and took on weight and depth. By the last third of the book, I was on the edge of my seat wondering how the destiny of the two star-crossed lovers could possibly have the happy ending that I desired. Although such questions drive the story forward, much of the story’s true strength comes from Wilkins’ almost poetic incorporation of accurate Norse mythology and weather science.

    Narrator Edwina Wren delivers the story in either English or Scandinavian accents as the story requires. Her performance is compelling, especially when depicting Aud and Vidar. Transitions from one section to another are indicated with music which is welcome in helping the listener make the necessary mental switch in a book that has many points of view. This is an extremely pleasing audio book overall and Wren is a narrator to seek out in the future.

  9. Jo Jo says:

    This is as much a romance as a thriller or a mystery. I loved every moment of it, and fell in love with Vidar in a way I wouldn't have throught possible.

    I loved the intertwined threads of plots and fates, the cuts between Asgard and Earth, and the stories of passion gone in unforeseen directions.

    As I was reading, I found myself growing every more concerned about the ending. It seemed impossible that the story could end happily, but I was concerned that a tragic ending would make me feel that the entire book had been pointless. I needn't have worried. Wilkins delivers a beautifully considered, authentic and (most of all) satisfying conclusion to what I would consider a love story of the ages.

    I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in historical fiction, historical romance and Norse themed tales.

  10. Kristīne Kristīne says:

    I got as far as the middle and just had to say no and mark as dnf.

    The premise was good, the characters were compelling at first but the more I read the less I enjoyed it. and to be honest I didn't expect it to get so frustrating to deal with, not just the characters, but plot wise some things were not well executed.

    I got so tired of waiting for Victoria and Vidar to meet and when they did it turned out to be really disappointing.

    The switching point of views didn't help the matter either.

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