The Lady of Shalott Epub â The Lady Epub /

The Lady of Shalott Epub â The Lady Epub /


  • Paperback
  • 40 pages
  • The Lady of Shalott
  • Alfred Tennyson
  • English
  • 01 August 2016
  • 9780192723710

10 thoughts on “The Lady of Shalott

  1. Sean Barrs Sean Barrs says:

    This poem is one of the first I ever read and is a true pleasure to read aloud Go on give it a try But perhaps only do so when nobody else is in the house to save embarrassmentThe Lady of Shallot is a lonely figure; she is isolated form the world and stuck up in a tower She can only look out and admire the world that she cannot touch and cannot take part in The world is separated from her by the height of the tower and the river moat that surrounds it it constantly reminds her that she is completely and utterly alone in this world This is emphasised by the fact that the reader isn’t privy to her thoughts and emotions; she is a distant figure within the poem which makes her remoteness felt by the reader in the poem’s lovely lyrical tones It is no wonder then that when the glorious Sir Lancelot starts prancing about in a majestic manner that she is taken by him He represents the so called glory days of England; he is splendid and noble He is a mirror of the Arthurian myth and the wonders of Camelot The Lady has been completely seduced by the teasing reflections in her mirror and she can no longer resist the temptation to go to him She’s never seen such a wonderful man from the dimness of her tower window She tosses down her spinning and rushes to him She abandons her mirror and seclusion But she was cursed and ultimately caused her own death She knew she couldn’t leave the tower but did so anyway To my mind this is a reflection of the women of the Victorian age; they were restricted and confined like the Lady An attempt to break those restrictions would lead in destruction because society for women was oppressive and controlling Women apparently were supposed to know their place Perhaps the poem is a suggestion of what happens to women who try to break their chains I think this can be seen in both a positive and negative light Positive in that it’s a metaphor for women’s place in society intent of showing injustice and negative in that it shows what happens to women who disobey so to be shown as a warning Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A pale pale corpse she floated by Deadcold between the houses high Dead into tower'd Camelot Knight and burgher lord and dame To the planked wharfage came Below the stern they read her name The Lady of Shalott


  2. Lynne King Lynne King says:

    Update Covid 19 14 April 2020”In a way I was pleased that last night President Macron decided to extend the lockdown for an additional four weeks If it will save lives that is the main thing but the other disturbing fact is how many people at the end of this long journey are going to cope both financially and mentally?So in my temporary period of gloom I thought of this beautiful poem but so apt today Scroll down and you will see it in the text hereThis suits my current frame of mind beautifullyAn absolutely splendid work That's all I need to sayI read it years ago but now it seems to have had of a profound impact on me for some obscure reasonIt's short but one can really savour all the nuancesI especially likedShe left the web she left the loomShe made three paces through the roomShe saw the water lily bloomShe saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to CamelotOut flew the web and floated wide;The mirror crack'd from side to side;The curse is come upon me cried The Lady of Shalott”Exuisite


  3. Jonathan Terrington Jonathan Terrington says:

    Alongside Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven Alfred Tennyson's The Lady of Shalott stands as one of the fascinating works of poetry from the 1800s Aesthetically it is a work of great and simply beauty therefore providing evidence that language in a poetic simplicity can provide some of the greatest and most beautiful ideas and images After all in the Bible the splendour of light was released with 'Let there be light'The poem appears simple on the outside with a nice flowing rhythm reinforced by the repetitious aaaabcccb structure and the use of the word Shalott to close almost each stanza Yet the poem is far complex than its language may suggest There are hints of various critiues and subversions of traditional love narratives buried in Tennyson's work and as such The Lady of Shalott becomes another fantasy tale that reflects on realityThe narrative essentially describing how one Lady of Shalott trapped in a tower is forced to view the world of Camelot through a mirror lest she succumb to a curse Eventually she does turn from the mirror to look down at the glittering gem covered Lancelot the poem's ultimate symbol of masculinity and virility As a result her mirror and artistry break signs that her curse has fallen upon her As a result she leaves her tower in a boat and floats down to Camelot only to arrive dead and drained of blood Where only Lancelot is considerate enough to look upon her and comment that She has a lovely face;God in his mercy lend her graceThe Lady of ShalottMany critics have suggested that The Lady of the poem is the perfect symbol for how Victorian women were expected to behave therefore making of this poem a feminist critiue The sense pervades the poem that when the Lady looks down at her possible lover the beautified Lancelot it is because she is a woman and therefore supposedly given into the irrational The very idea that this woman has to be kept hidden in a tower concealed away from society and perhaps from exploring her sexuality is in itself a uniue critiue Therefore it is possible that Tennyson intended the poem to criticise the idea that women were meant to be seen and not heard; objects of beauty but not of necessarily logical capacity The fact that Tennyson was Poet Laureate for the ueen leads one to consider the strong indications that this poem was intended to be political in natureAnother angle to observe this poem from is the perspective of the poem as a subversion of the classic fairytale knight uest Considering the way in which Tennyson uses Arthurian myth and legend in the poem this again seems like another way in which Tennyson perhaps criticises romantic love in relation to male and female dynamics There is the sense that Tennyson condemns the romantic idea of the gallant chivalrous knight rescuing the damsel in distress for in his narrative the knights do not come to rescue the damsel and instead the damsel must leave her tower for the knight resulting in her death This could be seen as an indication that Tennyson believes that there are no happy ever afters and that chivalry is a naive idea of the past particular when one connects the poem to the reality of the industrialised age Tennyson lived in Or one could read it as a condemnation of women being forced to become independent and rely upon their own strength that essentially without a knight to rescue them a woman will die from a curse One of the motifs in the poem is the use of ethereal dreamlike constructs Mirrors and shadows in particular feature heavily in the poem from the mirror the Lady is forced to observe the world through A mirror which could be seen as a symbol for the social constraints obscuring that which can be truly seen Then again how the Lady weaves what she sees in the mirror into a web of tapestry could be viewed as a criticism of how the artist performs their work A particularly poignant idea when connected to the nature of Tennyson being Poet Laureate 'I am half sick of shadows' saidThe Lady of ShalottWhatever way you choose to read this poem it is a fascinating work as is most of Tennyson's work And in some senses it is a danger to read too much into the poem for fear of ignoring the sheer aesthetic beauty of it Indeed Tennyson is a poet who understands how to capture musicality with words and as such his work should be read by anyone interested in literature


  4. Helga Helga says:

    She left the web she left the loom She made three paces thro' the room She saw the water flower bloom She saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to Camelot Out flew the web and floated wide; The mirror crack'd from side to side; 'The curse is come upon me' cried The Lady of ShalottThe Lady of Shalott is a sad and haunting poem about a noblewoman imprisoned in a tower who is cursed and sees the real world only through a mirror


  5. Duane Duane says:

    Many people I dare say most will claim to not like poetry but this is one of those poems that I believe everyone can read and enjoy The enchantment of the rhythm and rhyme of Tennyson's words the hint of romance and the allusion to magic all combine to make this poem a memorable pleasureTennyson actually wrote two versions of this poem ten years apart 1832 1842 The later one is one verse shorter than the first both very similar both very good


  6. Manny Manny says:

    There's a nice moment in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie which references this poem They're reading it in class and they've just reached the lineAnd round about the prow she wrote 'The Lady of Shalott'The schoolgirl daydreaming and only half paying attention imagines herself talking with Tennyson's eponymous heroineWhat did you write it with? she asksI found a pot of paint on the bank replies the Lady It had probably been left there by one of the Unemployed


  7. Kelly Kelly says:

    My favorite poem Even after all these years it still gets to me It is long but worth it I feel I beg of you to read past the Romantic descriptions of nature and the older English to what's really in thereOn either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye That clothe the wold and meet the sky; And through the field the road run by To many tower'd Camelot; And up and down the people go Gazing where the lilies blow Round an island there below The island of Shalott Willows whiten aspens uiver Little breezes dusk and shiver Through the wave that runs for ever By the island in the river Flowing down to Camelot Four grey walls and four grey towers Overlook a space of flowers And the silent isle imbowers The Lady of Shalott By the margin willow veil'dSlide the heavy barges trail'd By slow horses; and unhail'd The shallop flitteth silken sail'dSkimming down to Camelot But who hath seen her wave her hand? Or at the casement seen her stand? Or is she known in all the land The Lady of Shalott? Only reapers reaping early In among the bearded barley Hear a song that echoes cheerly From the river winding clearly; Down to tower'd Camelot; And by the moon the reaper weary Piling sheaves in uplands airy Listening whispers 'Tis the fairy The Lady of Shalott There she weaves by night and day A magic web with colours gay She has heard a whisper say A curse is on her if she stay To look down to Camelot She knows not what the curse may be And so she weaveth steadily And little other care hath she The Lady of Shalott And moving through a mirror clear That hangs before her all the year Shadows of the world appear There she sees the highway near Winding down to Camelot; There the river eddy whirls And there the surly village churls And the red cloaks of market girls Pass onward from Shalott Sometimes a troop of damsels glad An abbot on an ambling pad Sometimes a curly shepherd lad Or long hair'd page in crimson clad Goes by to tower'd Camelot; And sometimes through the mirror blue The knights come riding two and two She hath no loyal Knight and true The Lady of Shalott But in her web she still delights To weave the mirror's magic sights For often through the silent nights A funeral with plumes and lights And music went to Camelot; Or when the Moon was overhead Came two young lovers lately wed I am half sick of shadows said The Lady of Shalott A bow shot from her bower eaves He rode between the barley sheaves The sun came dazzling thro' the leaves And flamed upon the brazen greaves Of bold Sir Lancelot A red cross knight for ever kneel'd To a lady in his shield That sparkled on the yellow field Beside remote Shalott The gemmy bridle glitter'd free Like to some branch of stars we see Hung in the golden Galaxy The bridle bells rang merrily As he rode down to Camelot And from his blazon'd baldric slung A mighty silver bugle hung And as he rode his armor rung Beside remote Shalott All in the blue unclouded weather Thick jewell'd shone the saddle leather The helmet and the helmet feather Burn'd like one burning flame together As he rode down to Camelot As often thro' the purple night Below the starry clusters bright Some bearded meteor burning bright Moves over still Shalott His broad clear brow in sunlight glow'd; On burnish'd hooves his war horse trode; From underneath his helmet flow'd His coal black curls as on he rode As he rode down to Camelot From the bank and from the river He flashed into the crystal mirror Tirra lirra by the river Sang Sir Lancelot She left the web she left the loom She made three paces through the room She saw the water lily bloom She saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to Camelot Out flew the web and floated wide; The mirror crack'd from side to side; The curse is come upon me cried The Lady of Shalott In the stormy east wind straining The pale yellow woods were waning The broad stream in his banks complaining Heavily the low sky raining Over tower'd Camelot; Down she came and found a boat Beneath a willow left afloat And around about the prow she wrote The Lady of Shalott And down the river's dim expanse Like some bold seer in a trance Seeing all his own mischance With a glassy countenance Did she look to Camelot And at the closing of the day She loosed the chain and down she lay; The broad stream bore her far away The Lady of Shalott Lying robed in snowy white That loosely flew to left and right The leaves upon her falling light Thro' the noises of the night She floated down to Camelot And as the boat head wound along The willowy hills and fields among They heard her singing her last song The Lady of Shalott Heard a carol mournful holy Chanted loudly chanted lowly Till her blood was frozen slowly And her eyes were darkened wholly Turn'd to tower'd Camelot For ere she reach'd upon the tide The first house by the water side Singing in her song she died The Lady of Shalott Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A gleaming shape she floated by Dead pale between the houses high Silent into Camelot Out upon the wharfs they came Knight and Burgher Lord and Dame And around the prow they read her name The Lady of Shalott Who is this? And what is here? And in the lighted palace near Died the sound of royal cheer; And they crossed themselves for fear All the Knights at Camelot; But Lancelot mused a little space He said She has a lovely face; God in his mercy lent her grace The Lady of ShalottMy favorite verse is this oneBut in her web she still delights To weave the mirror's magic sights For often through the silent nights A funeral with plumes and lights And music went to Camelot; Or when the Moon was overhead Came two young lovers lately wed I am half sick of shadows said The Lady of Shalott


  8. James James says:

    This is the only Tennyson that I have ever read and I really enjoyed it I would definitely be interested in reading Tennyson any recommendations would be very welcome


  9. Fred Fred says:

    I had to read this book today for work purposes Oh my God I loved it so muchI would recommend knowing the plot BEFORE reading it That really helps with Tennyson or any form of ballad I thinkIn the space of about a day I fell in love with a poem Who knew what joys work could bringI initially gave this five stars because I loved the experience but as a poem it can get uite forgettable after a while and I was having doubts so I took this down to four stars


  10. Liz Janet Liz Janet says:

    This story is loosely based on the tale of Elaine of Astolat and of her love for Lancelot which in this poem brings upon her a curse that leaves her dead Arthurian legends defined my childhood so it is only basic that such a poem would mark me The Lady cannot look upon the people so she stares through a mirror at the road and sees Lancelot and falls in love with him her desire to go after him but most importantly break free dooms her Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A pale pale corpse she floated by Deadcold between the houses high Dead into tower'd Camelot Knight and burgher lord and dame To the planked wharfage came Below the stern they read her name The Lady of Shalott This poem has been so influential in society that just for simple reference In other literature it is referred in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark where Miss Jean Brodie reads the poem to her class Alice Munro refers to some of the lines of this ballad in her short story Save the Reaper Only the reapers reaping early and And by the moon the reaper weary It was also one of the few things I enjoyed in Avalon High where at the beginning of every chapter there is a stanza from thisIn music I am not so well versed but there is a lovely piano piece called La dame de Shalotte by Olivier MessiaenAlso do we not get a vibe of this poem in the Band Perry's song If I Die Young because I kind of doThis is such a beautiful poem and I cannot recommend it enough


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The Lady of Shalott[Reading] ➶ The Lady of Shalott ➬ Alfred Tennyson – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Lady of Shalott is the third book in Visions in Poetry an award winning series of classic poems illustrated by outstanding contemporary artists in stunning hardcover editions Tennyson's beautiful The Lady of Shalott is the third book in Visions in Poetry an award winning series of classic poems illustrated by outstanding contemporary artists in stunning hardcover editions Tennyson's beautiful and enigmatic poem of unreuited love set in Arthurian England has enthralled artists for well over a century With her luminous illustrations Genevive Ct weaves a refreshingly modern interpretation of this beloved poem one that will enchant readers of all ages' to 'This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have The Lady Epub / occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages poor pictures errant marks etc that were either part of the original artifact or were introduced by the scanning process We believe this work is culturally important and despite the imperfections have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process and hope you enjoy this valuable book.


About the Author: Alfred Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson invariably known as Alfred Lord Tennyson on all his books was born in Somersby Lincolnshire the fourth of the twelve children of George Tennyson clergyman and his wife Elizabeth In Tennyson was sent to Louth Grammar School which he disliked so intensely that from he was educated at home until at the age of he joined his two brothers at Trinity College Cambrid.


10 thoughts on “The Lady of Shalott

  1. Sean Barrs Sean Barrs says:

    This poem is one of the first I ever read and is a true pleasure to read aloud Go on give it a try But perhaps only do so when nobody else is in the house to save embarrassmentThe Lady of Shallot is a lonely figure; she is isolated form the world and stuck up in a tower She can only look out and admire the world that she cannot touch and cannot take part in The world is separated from her by the height of the tower and the river moat that surrounds it it constantly reminds her that she is completely and utterly alone in this world This is emphasised by the fact that the reader isn’t privy to her thoughts and emotions; she is a distant figure within the poem which makes her remoteness felt by the reader in the poem’s lovely lyrical tones It is no wonder then that when the glorious Sir Lancelot starts prancing about in a majestic manner that she is taken by him He represents the so called glory days of England; he is splendid and noble He is a mirror of the Arthurian myth and the wonders of Camelot The Lady has been completely seduced by the teasing reflections in her mirror and she can no longer resist the temptation to go to him She’s never seen such a wonderful man from the dimness of her tower window She tosses down her spinning and rushes to him She abandons her mirror and seclusion But she was cursed and ultimately caused her own death She knew she couldn’t leave the tower but did so anyway To my mind this is a reflection of the women of the Victorian age; they were restricted and confined like the Lady An attempt to break those restrictions would lead in destruction because society for women was oppressive and controlling Women apparently were supposed to know their place Perhaps the poem is a suggestion of what happens to women who try to break their chains I think this can be seen in both a positive and negative light Positive in that it’s a metaphor for women’s place in society intent of showing injustice and negative in that it shows what happens to women who disobey so to be shown as a warning Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A pale pale corpse she floated by Deadcold between the houses high Dead into tower'd Camelot Knight and burgher lord and dame To the planked wharfage came Below the stern they read her name The Lady of Shalott

  2. Lynne King Lynne King says:

    Update Covid 19 14 April 2020”In a way I was pleased that last night President Macron decided to extend the lockdown for an additional four weeks If it will save lives that is the main thing but the other disturbing fact is how many people at the end of this long journey are going to cope both financially and mentally?So in my temporary period of gloom I thought of this beautiful poem but so apt today Scroll down and you will see it in the text hereThis suits my current frame of mind beautifullyAn absolutely splendid work That's all I need to sayI read it years ago but now it seems to have had of a profound impact on me for some obscure reasonIt's short but one can really savour all the nuancesI especially likedShe left the web she left the loomShe made three paces through the roomShe saw the water lily bloomShe saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to CamelotOut flew the web and floated wide;The mirror crack'd from side to side;The curse is come upon me cried The Lady of Shalott”Exuisite

  3. Jonathan Terrington Jonathan Terrington says:

    Alongside Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven Alfred Tennyson's The Lady of Shalott stands as one of the fascinating works of poetry from the 1800s Aesthetically it is a work of great and simply beauty therefore providing evidence that language in a poetic simplicity can provide some of the greatest and most beautiful ideas and images After all in the Bible the splendour of light was released with 'Let there be light'The poem appears simple on the outside with a nice flowing rhythm reinforced by the repetitious aaaabcccb structure and the use of the word Shalott to close almost each stanza Yet the poem is far complex than its language may suggest There are hints of various critiues and subversions of traditional love narratives buried in Tennyson's work and as such The Lady of Shalott becomes another fantasy tale that reflects on realityThe narrative essentially describing how one Lady of Shalott trapped in a tower is forced to view the world of Camelot through a mirror lest she succumb to a curse Eventually she does turn from the mirror to look down at the glittering gem covered Lancelot the poem's ultimate symbol of masculinity and virility As a result her mirror and artistry break signs that her curse has fallen upon her As a result she leaves her tower in a boat and floats down to Camelot only to arrive dead and drained of blood Where only Lancelot is considerate enough to look upon her and comment that She has a lovely face;God in his mercy lend her graceThe Lady of ShalottMany critics have suggested that The Lady of the poem is the perfect symbol for how Victorian women were expected to behave therefore making of this poem a feminist critiue The sense pervades the poem that when the Lady looks down at her possible lover the beautified Lancelot it is because she is a woman and therefore supposedly given into the irrational The very idea that this woman has to be kept hidden in a tower concealed away from society and perhaps from exploring her sexuality is in itself a uniue critiue Therefore it is possible that Tennyson intended the poem to criticise the idea that women were meant to be seen and not heard; objects of beauty but not of necessarily logical capacity The fact that Tennyson was Poet Laureate for the ueen leads one to consider the strong indications that this poem was intended to be political in natureAnother angle to observe this poem from is the perspective of the poem as a subversion of the classic fairytale knight uest Considering the way in which Tennyson uses Arthurian myth and legend in the poem this again seems like another way in which Tennyson perhaps criticises romantic love in relation to male and female dynamics There is the sense that Tennyson condemns the romantic idea of the gallant chivalrous knight rescuing the damsel in distress for in his narrative the knights do not come to rescue the damsel and instead the damsel must leave her tower for the knight resulting in her death This could be seen as an indication that Tennyson believes that there are no happy ever afters and that chivalry is a naive idea of the past particular when one connects the poem to the reality of the industrialised age Tennyson lived in Or one could read it as a condemnation of women being forced to become independent and rely upon their own strength that essentially without a knight to rescue them a woman will die from a curse One of the motifs in the poem is the use of ethereal dreamlike constructs Mirrors and shadows in particular feature heavily in the poem from the mirror the Lady is forced to observe the world through A mirror which could be seen as a symbol for the social constraints obscuring that which can be truly seen Then again how the Lady weaves what she sees in the mirror into a web of tapestry could be viewed as a criticism of how the artist performs their work A particularly poignant idea when connected to the nature of Tennyson being Poet Laureate 'I am half sick of shadows' saidThe Lady of ShalottWhatever way you choose to read this poem it is a fascinating work as is most of Tennyson's work And in some senses it is a danger to read too much into the poem for fear of ignoring the sheer aesthetic beauty of it Indeed Tennyson is a poet who understands how to capture musicality with words and as such his work should be read by anyone interested in literature

  4. Helga Helga says:

    She left the web she left the loom She made three paces thro' the room She saw the water flower bloom She saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to Camelot Out flew the web and floated wide; The mirror crack'd from side to side; 'The curse is come upon me' cried The Lady of ShalottThe Lady of Shalott is a sad and haunting poem about a noblewoman imprisoned in a tower who is cursed and sees the real world only through a mirror

  5. Duane Duane says:

    Many people I dare say most will claim to not like poetry but this is one of those poems that I believe everyone can read and enjoy The enchantment of the rhythm and rhyme of Tennyson's words the hint of romance and the allusion to magic all combine to make this poem a memorable pleasureTennyson actually wrote two versions of this poem ten years apart 1832 1842 The later one is one verse shorter than the first both very similar both very good

  6. Manny Manny says:

    There's a nice moment in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie which references this poem They're reading it in class and they've just reached the lineAnd round about the prow she wrote 'The Lady of Shalott'The schoolgirl daydreaming and only half paying attention imagines herself talking with Tennyson's eponymous heroineWhat did you write it with? she asksI found a pot of paint on the bank replies the Lady It had probably been left there by one of the Unemployed

  7. Kelly Kelly says:

    My favorite poem Even after all these years it still gets to me It is long but worth it I feel I beg of you to read past the Romantic descriptions of nature and the older English to what's really in thereOn either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye That clothe the wold and meet the sky; And through the field the road run by To many tower'd Camelot; And up and down the people go Gazing where the lilies blow Round an island there below The island of Shalott Willows whiten aspens uiver Little breezes dusk and shiver Through the wave that runs for ever By the island in the river Flowing down to Camelot Four grey walls and four grey towers Overlook a space of flowers And the silent isle imbowers The Lady of Shalott By the margin willow veil'dSlide the heavy barges trail'd By slow horses; and unhail'd The shallop flitteth silken sail'dSkimming down to Camelot But who hath seen her wave her hand? Or at the casement seen her stand? Or is she known in all the land The Lady of Shalott? Only reapers reaping early In among the bearded barley Hear a song that echoes cheerly From the river winding clearly; Down to tower'd Camelot; And by the moon the reaper weary Piling sheaves in uplands airy Listening whispers 'Tis the fairy The Lady of Shalott There she weaves by night and day A magic web with colours gay She has heard a whisper say A curse is on her if she stay To look down to Camelot She knows not what the curse may be And so she weaveth steadily And little other care hath she The Lady of Shalott And moving through a mirror clear That hangs before her all the year Shadows of the world appear There she sees the highway near Winding down to Camelot; There the river eddy whirls And there the surly village churls And the red cloaks of market girls Pass onward from Shalott Sometimes a troop of damsels glad An abbot on an ambling pad Sometimes a curly shepherd lad Or long hair'd page in crimson clad Goes by to tower'd Camelot; And sometimes through the mirror blue The knights come riding two and two She hath no loyal Knight and true The Lady of Shalott But in her web she still delights To weave the mirror's magic sights For often through the silent nights A funeral with plumes and lights And music went to Camelot; Or when the Moon was overhead Came two young lovers lately wed I am half sick of shadows said The Lady of Shalott A bow shot from her bower eaves He rode between the barley sheaves The sun came dazzling thro' the leaves And flamed upon the brazen greaves Of bold Sir Lancelot A red cross knight for ever kneel'd To a lady in his shield That sparkled on the yellow field Beside remote Shalott The gemmy bridle glitter'd free Like to some branch of stars we see Hung in the golden Galaxy The bridle bells rang merrily As he rode down to Camelot And from his blazon'd baldric slung A mighty silver bugle hung And as he rode his armor rung Beside remote Shalott All in the blue unclouded weather Thick jewell'd shone the saddle leather The helmet and the helmet feather Burn'd like one burning flame together As he rode down to Camelot As often thro' the purple night Below the starry clusters bright Some bearded meteor burning bright Moves over still Shalott His broad clear brow in sunlight glow'd; On burnish'd hooves his war horse trode; From underneath his helmet flow'd His coal black curls as on he rode As he rode down to Camelot From the bank and from the river He flashed into the crystal mirror Tirra lirra by the river Sang Sir Lancelot She left the web she left the loom She made three paces through the room She saw the water lily bloom She saw the helmet and the plume She look'd down to Camelot Out flew the web and floated wide; The mirror crack'd from side to side; The curse is come upon me cried The Lady of Shalott In the stormy east wind straining The pale yellow woods were waning The broad stream in his banks complaining Heavily the low sky raining Over tower'd Camelot; Down she came and found a boat Beneath a willow left afloat And around about the prow she wrote The Lady of Shalott And down the river's dim expanse Like some bold seer in a trance Seeing all his own mischance With a glassy countenance Did she look to Camelot And at the closing of the day She loosed the chain and down she lay; The broad stream bore her far away The Lady of Shalott Lying robed in snowy white That loosely flew to left and right The leaves upon her falling light Thro' the noises of the night She floated down to Camelot And as the boat head wound along The willowy hills and fields among They heard her singing her last song The Lady of Shalott Heard a carol mournful holy Chanted loudly chanted lowly Till her blood was frozen slowly And her eyes were darkened wholly Turn'd to tower'd Camelot For ere she reach'd upon the tide The first house by the water side Singing in her song she died The Lady of Shalott Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A gleaming shape she floated by Dead pale between the houses high Silent into Camelot Out upon the wharfs they came Knight and Burgher Lord and Dame And around the prow they read her name The Lady of Shalott Who is this? And what is here? And in the lighted palace near Died the sound of royal cheer; And they crossed themselves for fear All the Knights at Camelot; But Lancelot mused a little space He said She has a lovely face; God in his mercy lent her grace The Lady of ShalottMy favorite verse is this oneBut in her web she still delights To weave the mirror's magic sights For often through the silent nights A funeral with plumes and lights And music went to Camelot; Or when the Moon was overhead Came two young lovers lately wed I am half sick of shadows said The Lady of Shalott

  8. James James says:

    This is the only Tennyson that I have ever read and I really enjoyed it I would definitely be interested in reading Tennyson any recommendations would be very welcome

  9. Fred Fred says:

    I had to read this book today for work purposes Oh my God I loved it so muchI would recommend knowing the plot BEFORE reading it That really helps with Tennyson or any form of ballad I thinkIn the space of about a day I fell in love with a poem Who knew what joys work could bringI initially gave this five stars because I loved the experience but as a poem it can get uite forgettable after a while and I was having doubts so I took this down to four stars

  10. Liz Janet Liz Janet says:

    This story is loosely based on the tale of Elaine of Astolat and of her love for Lancelot which in this poem brings upon her a curse that leaves her dead Arthurian legends defined my childhood so it is only basic that such a poem would mark me The Lady cannot look upon the people so she stares through a mirror at the road and sees Lancelot and falls in love with him her desire to go after him but most importantly break free dooms her Under tower and balcony By garden wall and gallery A pale pale corpse she floated by Deadcold between the houses high Dead into tower'd Camelot Knight and burgher lord and dame To the planked wharfage came Below the stern they read her name The Lady of Shalott This poem has been so influential in society that just for simple reference In other literature it is referred in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark where Miss Jean Brodie reads the poem to her class Alice Munro refers to some of the lines of this ballad in her short story Save the Reaper Only the reapers reaping early and And by the moon the reaper weary It was also one of the few things I enjoyed in Avalon High where at the beginning of every chapter there is a stanza from thisIn music I am not so well versed but there is a lovely piano piece called La dame de Shalotte by Olivier MessiaenAlso do we not get a vibe of this poem in the Band Perry's song If I Die Young because I kind of doThis is such a beautiful poem and I cannot recommend it enough

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