Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway,

Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway,



10 thoughts on “Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland & Iceland

  1. christina christina says:

    I hate to say that these were really disappointing There was literally only ONE story about vikings in this whole book Also worth noting, is that these tales are heavily influenced by early christian views of the Scandinavian countries, rather than the pantheon of norse gods and goddesses Recorded between the 1400 1900s, a lot of the tales reward the male characters for scheming, tricking and murdering their way to riches or crowns While their female counterparts were punished for not bein I hate to say that these were really disappointing There was literally only ONE story about vikings in this whole book Also worth noting, is that these tales are heavily influenced by early christian views of the Scandinavian countries, rather than the pantheon of norse gods and goddesses Recorded between the 1400 1900s, a lot of the tales reward the male characters for scheming, tricking and murdering their way to riches or crowns While their female counterparts were punished for not being submissive or acting in their own best interests, which was obviously not entertaining to me as a reader.Here were some of my favorites from each section note there are not many Section 1, Tales from Norway The Lad and the North WindEast of the Sun and West of the MoonMaster TobaccoSection 2, Tales from Sweden The WerwolfSection 3, Tales from Denmark The Troll s HammerToller s NeighborsThe Girl Clad in MouseskinSection 4, Tales from Finland The Mouse BrideAntti and the Wizard s ProphecyJurma and the Sea GodLiisa and the PrinceSection 5, Tales from Iceland The Grateful ElfwomanHildur, the Queen of the Elves


  2. Claire Claire says:

    Finland wins for best fairy tales


  3. Sara Sara says:

    This book collects many folk and fairy tales from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland The stories are pulled from the oral tradition and thus vary greatly in length and level of complexity Some are just a quick paragraph with a moral, while others areof a short story length and feature fantastic descriptions, legendary characters, and so on The stories retain an authentic feeling voice I can just picture an 18th century goatherd telling these tales to a visiting folklorist I This book collects many folk and fairy tales from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland The stories are pulled from the oral tradition and thus vary greatly in length and level of complexity Some are just a quick paragraph with a moral, while others areof a short story length and feature fantastic descriptions, legendary characters, and so on The stories retain an authentic feeling voice I can just picture an 18th century goatherd telling these tales to a visiting folklorist I was particularly interested in learning about Icelandic folklore, which often seem to feature troublesome elf human interactions at Christmastime I read some of the tales from other countries too There s a wide variety, telling of trolls, elves, witches, wish granting beings, princesses, andSome elements will be familiar to readers of fairy tales from other places, while others hint at particularly Scandinavian beasts, landscapes, and characters


  4. no_more_color no_more_color says:

    Oh, thousands of times have we played on the shore,And caught little fishes dost mind it noWe raced with the surf as it rolled at our feet,And the lurking old Merman we always did cheat Yes, much shalt thou think of at my lullaby,Whilst the billows do rock and the breezes do sigh.Who sits now and weeps o er thy cheeks It is sheWho gave thee her soul, and whose soul lived in thee But once as an eider duck homeward I cameThou didst lie neath a rock, with thy rifle didst aim In my brea Oh, thousands of times have we played on the shore,And caught little fishes dost mind it noWe raced with the surf as it rolled at our feet,And the lurking old Merman we always did cheat Yes, much shalt thou think of at my lullaby,Whilst the billows do rock and the breezes do sigh.Who sits now and weeps o er thy cheeks It is sheWho gave thee her soul, and whose soul lived in thee But once as an eider duck homeward I cameThou didst lie neath a rock, with thy rifle didst aim In my breast thou didst strike me the blood thou dost seeIs the mark that I bear, oh beloved one, of thee This excerpt from the Finnish tale Finn Blood captures the spirit of the entire collection, but these stories are important for another reason my favorite video games derive many of their plot lines from them


  5. Kira Brighton Kira Brighton says:

    I enjoyed reading all these different folk and fairytales, and comparing them was quite interesting For example, in all these Scandinavian tales, it s not love that transforms a creature back into a prince, it s murder Specifically, cutting his head off How weird is that Also, they have a thing about swan selkies.In the tales from Norway, my favorites were East of the Sun and West of the Moon, The Honest Penny, and Boots and the Beasts From Sweden, What Shall Baby s Name Be was def I enjoyed reading all these different folk and fairytales, and comparing them was quite interesting For example, in all these Scandinavian tales, it s not love that transforms a creature back into a prince, it s murder Specifically, cutting his head off How weird is that Also, they have a thing about swan selkies.In the tales from Norway, my favorites were East of the Sun and West of the Moon, The Honest Penny, and Boots and the Beasts From Sweden, What Shall Baby s Name Be was definitely calling me out, while I enjoyed The Ten Fairy Servants and The Werwolf best Denmark had a whole section of stories from my boy Hans Christian Andersen, whom I love, with favorites like The Wild Swans, The Elf of the Rose, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, and The Marsh King s Daughter From Finland, I best liked Vaino and the Swan Princess, The Mouse Bride, and Jurma and the Sea God Finally, Iceland s tales struck me as the most simplistic, but I quite liked Hildur, the Queen of the Elves


  6. Lock Lock says:

    Great stories, and while the introduction describes Christianity as the early and prime faith of Scandinavia, some do retain elements of the pre Christian folk spirituality Its a pretty extensive collection The organization is by country, which allows interesting characterization of the various cultures of the region.


  7. Robert Costic Robert Costic says:

    This makes a good reference book but I don t see it as something to read cover to cover There are a huge number of tales, and with the exception of a few by Andersen they are told in the vernacular, which can grow tiring after a while.


  8. lisa lisa says:

    This was ok, very dense, and an excellent reference book that I can t bear to let the library get rid of, even though our only copy is falling to pieces, but I think I wanted to readabout the mythology of Scandinavia, so this book fell short.


  9. Bridgett Bridgett says:

    Vast collection of tales from all over Scandinavia.


  10. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A wonderful collection of folk and fairy tales you can see the roots of what inspired Tolkien and what continues to inspire Gaiman.


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Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland & Iceland ❰Read❯ ➳ Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland & Iceland Author Anonymous – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk A collection of folk literature from five countries, with illustrations by native artists A collection of folk literature from five countries, & Fairy Kindle Ó with illustrations by native artists.

10 thoughts on “Scandinavian Folk & Fairy Tales: Tales From Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland & Iceland

  1. christina christina says:

    I hate to say that these were really disappointing There was literally only ONE story about vikings in this whole book Also worth noting, is that these tales are heavily influenced by early christian views of the Scandinavian countries, rather than the pantheon of norse gods and goddesses Recorded between the 1400 1900s, a lot of the tales reward the male characters for scheming, tricking and murdering their way to riches or crowns While their female counterparts were punished for not bein I hate to say that these were really disappointing There was literally only ONE story about vikings in this whole book Also worth noting, is that these tales are heavily influenced by early christian views of the Scandinavian countries, rather than the pantheon of norse gods and goddesses Recorded between the 1400 1900s, a lot of the tales reward the male characters for scheming, tricking and murdering their way to riches or crowns While their female counterparts were punished for not being submissive or acting in their own best interests, which was obviously not entertaining to me as a reader.Here were some of my favorites from each section note there are not many Section 1, Tales from Norway The Lad and the North WindEast of the Sun and West of the MoonMaster TobaccoSection 2, Tales from Sweden The WerwolfSection 3, Tales from Denmark The Troll s HammerToller s NeighborsThe Girl Clad in MouseskinSection 4, Tales from Finland The Mouse BrideAntti and the Wizard s ProphecyJurma and the Sea GodLiisa and the PrinceSection 5, Tales from Iceland The Grateful ElfwomanHildur, the Queen of the Elves

  2. Claire Claire says:

    Finland wins for best fairy tales

  3. Sara Sara says:

    This book collects many folk and fairy tales from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland The stories are pulled from the oral tradition and thus vary greatly in length and level of complexity Some are just a quick paragraph with a moral, while others areof a short story length and feature fantastic descriptions, legendary characters, and so on The stories retain an authentic feeling voice I can just picture an 18th century goatherd telling these tales to a visiting folklorist I This book collects many folk and fairy tales from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland The stories are pulled from the oral tradition and thus vary greatly in length and level of complexity Some are just a quick paragraph with a moral, while others areof a short story length and feature fantastic descriptions, legendary characters, and so on The stories retain an authentic feeling voice I can just picture an 18th century goatherd telling these tales to a visiting folklorist I was particularly interested in learning about Icelandic folklore, which often seem to feature troublesome elf human interactions at Christmastime I read some of the tales from other countries too There s a wide variety, telling of trolls, elves, witches, wish granting beings, princesses, andSome elements will be familiar to readers of fairy tales from other places, while others hint at particularly Scandinavian beasts, landscapes, and characters

  4. no_more_color no_more_color says:

    Oh, thousands of times have we played on the shore,And caught little fishes dost mind it noWe raced with the surf as it rolled at our feet,And the lurking old Merman we always did cheat Yes, much shalt thou think of at my lullaby,Whilst the billows do rock and the breezes do sigh.Who sits now and weeps o er thy cheeks It is sheWho gave thee her soul, and whose soul lived in thee But once as an eider duck homeward I cameThou didst lie neath a rock, with thy rifle didst aim In my brea Oh, thousands of times have we played on the shore,And caught little fishes dost mind it noWe raced with the surf as it rolled at our feet,And the lurking old Merman we always did cheat Yes, much shalt thou think of at my lullaby,Whilst the billows do rock and the breezes do sigh.Who sits now and weeps o er thy cheeks It is sheWho gave thee her soul, and whose soul lived in thee But once as an eider duck homeward I cameThou didst lie neath a rock, with thy rifle didst aim In my breast thou didst strike me the blood thou dost seeIs the mark that I bear, oh beloved one, of thee This excerpt from the Finnish tale Finn Blood captures the spirit of the entire collection, but these stories are important for another reason my favorite video games derive many of their plot lines from them

  5. Kira Brighton Kira Brighton says:

    I enjoyed reading all these different folk and fairytales, and comparing them was quite interesting For example, in all these Scandinavian tales, it s not love that transforms a creature back into a prince, it s murder Specifically, cutting his head off How weird is that Also, they have a thing about swan selkies.In the tales from Norway, my favorites were East of the Sun and West of the Moon, The Honest Penny, and Boots and the Beasts From Sweden, What Shall Baby s Name Be was def I enjoyed reading all these different folk and fairytales, and comparing them was quite interesting For example, in all these Scandinavian tales, it s not love that transforms a creature back into a prince, it s murder Specifically, cutting his head off How weird is that Also, they have a thing about swan selkies.In the tales from Norway, my favorites were East of the Sun and West of the Moon, The Honest Penny, and Boots and the Beasts From Sweden, What Shall Baby s Name Be was definitely calling me out, while I enjoyed The Ten Fairy Servants and The Werwolf best Denmark had a whole section of stories from my boy Hans Christian Andersen, whom I love, with favorites like The Wild Swans, The Elf of the Rose, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, and The Marsh King s Daughter From Finland, I best liked Vaino and the Swan Princess, The Mouse Bride, and Jurma and the Sea God Finally, Iceland s tales struck me as the most simplistic, but I quite liked Hildur, the Queen of the Elves

  6. Lock Lock says:

    Great stories, and while the introduction describes Christianity as the early and prime faith of Scandinavia, some do retain elements of the pre Christian folk spirituality Its a pretty extensive collection The organization is by country, which allows interesting characterization of the various cultures of the region.

  7. Robert Costic Robert Costic says:

    This makes a good reference book but I don t see it as something to read cover to cover There are a huge number of tales, and with the exception of a few by Andersen they are told in the vernacular, which can grow tiring after a while.

  8. lisa lisa says:

    This was ok, very dense, and an excellent reference book that I can t bear to let the library get rid of, even though our only copy is falling to pieces, but I think I wanted to readabout the mythology of Scandinavia, so this book fell short.

  9. Bridgett Bridgett says:

    Vast collection of tales from all over Scandinavia.

  10. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A wonderful collection of folk and fairy tales you can see the roots of what inspired Tolkien and what continues to inspire Gaiman.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *