The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh

The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh

The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh [PDF] ✅ The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh Author Marié Heese – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This novel is the true story of Hatshepsut, the female pharaoh who ruled over Egypt for two decades around BC The double crown referes to her reign over Upper and Lower Egypt, but also the dual natur This novel is Crown: Secret PDF/EPUB » the true story of Hatshepsut, the female pharaoh who ruled over Egypt for two decades aroundBC The double crown referes to her reign over Upper and Lower Egypt, but also the dual nature of her life as pharaoh and woman in The Double PDF \ one person.


About the Author: Marié Heese

MARI HEESE taught Crown: Secret PDF/EPUB » English and Drama at various schools and universities, ending up at Unisa, where she worked on the development of distance learning materials Since taking early retirement, Mari has free lanced as an educational consultant and workshop presenter She is especially well The Double PDF \ known as the author of Die uurwerk kantel, an adult novel, which was first published in and republished as a classic in This novel has been adapted for the radio and for the stage, and was voted one of the best books of Double Crown: Secret ePUB ☆ the th century by library readers in the Western Cape Some of her other published titles Die Pikkewouters van Amper Stamperland, The Box Kite Summer, Haiku for Africa She is married to Chris Heese They currently live in Stilbaai and the Little Karoo.



10 thoughts on “The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh

  1. Iset Iset says:

    Having just finished The Double Crown, the thought foremost on my mind is how detached I feel from the characters and the story I ve read books before where the ending was bittersweet because I felt bereft at leaving it behind, but here I had no such reaction The characters felt very distant, and Hatshepsut herself, aloof It s a strange sensation because Hatshepsut does a lot in the novel, and yet most of it falls under the umbrella of her kingly duties, so whilst I got a good impression of a Having just finished The Double Crown, the thought foremost on my mind is how detached I feel from the characters and the story I ve read books before where the ending was bittersweet because I felt bereft at leaving it behind, but here I had no such reaction The characters felt very distant, and Hatshepsut herself, aloof It s a strange sensation because Hatshepsut does a lot in the novel, and yet most of it falls under the umbrella of her kingly duties, so whilst I got a good impression of a woman of action, I had barely any impression of her personality, her quirks and preferences.Yet, I would find it difficult to call this a bad book The writing is too good for that It isn t always as good as I would have hoped for as my friend and fellow reviewer has noted, the prologue is particularly tantalising in the way it builds up arresting imagery, promisingin the story to come but whilst I felt it never delivered on that same level of creativity throughout the novel, it certainly stood at a consistent standard of quality that I can t find fault with.Rather, for me it was a sequence of narrative choices that brings the book down For one, the book is told with the intercutting of various timeframes Hatshepsut telling the story of her past, Hatshepsut s struggles in the present, and the scribe Mahu s notes after the fact It isn t inherently wrong to present a story in this way, and a straightforward chronological narrative is so common that it is often criticised as being boring and unadventurous But it just didn t work in my opinion in this novel I found it difficult to feel engaged with Hatshepsut s struggles in the present when I had no idea of what led up to it, what the stakes were and so forth Mahu s sections add little to what is already there, and if anything, I think that the choice to have Hatshepsut tell this story as a memoir probably created that sense of detachment I felt towards the character, since she presents herself with kingly distance and as always right.I was surprised also that Heese incorporated the disproven Heiress Theory in such a modern publication I ve seen it in older ancient Egypt novels, but not in recent ones such as this Her bibliography is an awkward collection peppered with other ancient Egypt novels some not even about Hatshepsut and very outdated textbooks, which may explain this.I was initially tempted to rate this 7 out of 10 because the writing is so consistently capable, but the inclusion of view spoiler Hatshepsut s mean spiritedness towards her younger daughter and the late Senenmut, and Thutmose III s attempted rape of Hatshepsut, hide spoiler convinced me to settle on a 6 out of 10 rating Not only are they historically inaccurate, but it smacks of lurid character assassination simply to spice up the story, something which seems unnecessary when the real history is so interesting, and over insulting to the real people one is writing about As author Laurel Corona advises historical novelists do not defame the dead.After recently reading all the Hatshepsut novels I could get my hands on, I am left with the conclusion that Pauline Gedge s Child of the Morning, which I first read years ago, is still the best Hatshepsut of them all.6 out of 10


  2. Lisa Lisa says:

    Made up of twenty nine scrolls styled as the memoirs of Hatshepsut, Mari Heese s The Double Crown is an attempt to illuminate the life of Egypt s most famous female pharaoh Thinking that if Heese pulled it off, I would have a tremendous read on my hands, I spent about a year searching for a copy before the Kindle version was released this year Having read it, I feel disappointed Some people might feel that Heese pulled it off I don t I m not able to immerse myself in her Hatshepsut and Made up of twenty nine scrolls styled as the memoirs of Hatshepsut, Mari Heese s The Double Crown is an attempt to illuminate the life of Egypt s most famous female pharaoh Thinking that if Heese pulled it off, I would have a tremendous read on my hands, I spent about a year searching for a copy before the Kindle version was released this year Having read it, I feel disappointed Some people might feel that Heese pulled it off I don t I m not able to immerse myself in her Hatshepsut and her image of Ancient Egypt I don t believe in the characters and situations Heese creates It needed a leap of faith I just couldn t make.There s some good, though the prose is gorgeous The prologue just made me feel like I was entering into Ancient Egypt, a land of so much life I have sailed the Nile at sunset, floating on a sheet of living gold I have tasted the roasted liver of fat geese I have heard the haunting songs of the blind bard I have felt a child s soft arms, a dying woman s bony grip, a lover s warm caress I have inhaled the incense of the gods.Quickly, though, there s a few disappointments It became pretty clear that Heese s version of Thutmose III was one I was going to be at odds with I find it boring when Hatshepsut and Thutmose III are depicted as rival, slotted in the roles of hero and villain The current theories about their relationship suggest a complexity and depth that most Hatshepsut centric fiction seems to ignore, presenting a clear cut relationship that can be summed up, as Heese does, as she never liked him, nor does he like her.Okay, it might make aexciting plot and bring up possibilities of courtly intrigue and stuff, but I just find it repetitive, unoriginal and boring It means I m reading about the same relationship for the hundredth time and it s not even backed up by Egyptology any And I m fed up that it usually means areductive characterisation of Thutmose III that pays no attention to his noted depth for the love of god or Amun Re , Thutmose III was never just a brutish, war mongering soldier This sounds harsh, and I should point out that Heese s characterisation isn t a particularly bad case of villain Thutmose III, but it s just frustrating to see it come up for the hundredth time without adding anything new to the conversation It s just sad that the most intricate depiction of the Hatshepsut Thutmose relationship remains Pauline Gedge sChild of the Morningfrom over thirty years ago, when Egyptologists were happily telling us how much Hatshepsut and Thutmose hated each other.I had a few issues with the chronology of the book too During the earlier chapters scrolls it seemed as though Hatshepsut was darting between the distant past, the not so distant past and the present It s not a huge sin, mainly because I can imagine that writing your memoirs would encourage an introspection that connects the strands of the past to the future But I also struggled to work out the age differences between characters, or even just Hatshepsut s age most of the time At one stage, Hatshepsut does talk about being 28 when Thutmose III was 20, except I kept seeing him as a child in comparison to her probably because most of the theories on Hatshepsut suggest it The beautiful prose can t make up for a dearth of characterisation I mentioned above that Heese s characterisation of Thutmose isn t particularly bad, but it s mainly because everyone, even Hatshepsut, is held at a distance to the reader Everyone is a little vague, and while it could be a narrative choice to depict a Hatshepsut who would never reveal herself or anyone else, even in her secret writings, it doesn t work for me because we need to see Hatshepsut, at least, in all her intensity, for the novel to succeed I didn t know anyone enough to bring myself to care about them.Parts of Hatshepsut s character I just did not care for She dislikes her youngest daughter , Meryetre Hatshepsut, from birth, to the point where Neferure, a child herself, cares for her sister better than their mother later, too, Hatshepsut gloats about being thin while Meryetre is fat Ugh Then there s the love affair with Senenmut, which I actually liked because it wasn t all rainbows and perfect love, actually emphasising the struggle Hatshepsut faces between the knowledge that taking a lover may weaken her position, and her desire for affection and love view spoiler And then, it s revealed that Senenmut has a wife who has given birth to twin sons and Hatshepsut decides to have condemn the dead Senenmut into oblivion, to the point of hiring someone to destroy his body Wow hide spoiler Hatshepsut s writings are supplemented by commentary by Mahu, the scribe Hatshepsut entrusts with these scrolls A lot of his commentary felt unnecessary he either repeats his version of something Hatshepsut had already described, adding very little, or repeats some iteration of not good, not good, oh I wish I never dared to read these, but I can t stop now but I did think Mahu s insight worked well as an epilogue to Hatshepsut s memoirs To be honest, I found the most interesting part of the book is when Hatshepsut started doubting her right to rule and decision to keep Thutmose III from power But the book swiftly ends at that point, when it really could have started there.I was also pretty put out by the decision to depict Thutmose III view spoiler as attempting to rape Hatshepsut Rape is a serious issue and should not be used purely to show that Thutmose III is awful and Hatshepsut is awesome because she knocks him, the great warrior, out Which is pretty much all Heese uses the attempted rape scene for hide spoiler In all fairness, a lot of my issues with The Double Crown comes down to my familiarity with Hatshepsut narratives, both fiction and non fiction It s a fantastic idea that Heese had and she has enough skill to make me believe at the start that I am entering Ancient Egypt but it s a pity that her skill didn t extend to creating a Hatshepsut that felt real and alive and ultimately human


  3. Loraine Loraine says:

    Interesting But translation should have been done by a professional


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10 thoughts on “The Double Crown: Secret Writings of the Female Pharaoh

  1. Iset Iset says:

    Having just finished The Double Crown, the thought foremost on my mind is how detached I feel from the characters and the story I ve read books before where the ending was bittersweet because I felt bereft at leaving it behind, but here I had no such reaction The characters felt very distant, and Hatshepsut herself, aloof It s a strange sensation because Hatshepsut does a lot in the novel, and yet most of it falls under the umbrella of her kingly duties, so whilst I got a good impression of a Having just finished The Double Crown, the thought foremost on my mind is how detached I feel from the characters and the story I ve read books before where the ending was bittersweet because I felt bereft at leaving it behind, but here I had no such reaction The characters felt very distant, and Hatshepsut herself, aloof It s a strange sensation because Hatshepsut does a lot in the novel, and yet most of it falls under the umbrella of her kingly duties, so whilst I got a good impression of a woman of action, I had barely any impression of her personality, her quirks and preferences.Yet, I would find it difficult to call this a bad book The writing is too good for that It isn t always as good as I would have hoped for as my friend and fellow reviewer has noted, the prologue is particularly tantalising in the way it builds up arresting imagery, promisingin the story to come but whilst I felt it never delivered on that same level of creativity throughout the novel, it certainly stood at a consistent standard of quality that I can t find fault with.Rather, for me it was a sequence of narrative choices that brings the book down For one, the book is told with the intercutting of various timeframes Hatshepsut telling the story of her past, Hatshepsut s struggles in the present, and the scribe Mahu s notes after the fact It isn t inherently wrong to present a story in this way, and a straightforward chronological narrative is so common that it is often criticised as being boring and unadventurous But it just didn t work in my opinion in this novel I found it difficult to feel engaged with Hatshepsut s struggles in the present when I had no idea of what led up to it, what the stakes were and so forth Mahu s sections add little to what is already there, and if anything, I think that the choice to have Hatshepsut tell this story as a memoir probably created that sense of detachment I felt towards the character, since she presents herself with kingly distance and as always right.I was surprised also that Heese incorporated the disproven Heiress Theory in such a modern publication I ve seen it in older ancient Egypt novels, but not in recent ones such as this Her bibliography is an awkward collection peppered with other ancient Egypt novels some not even about Hatshepsut and very outdated textbooks, which may explain this.I was initially tempted to rate this 7 out of 10 because the writing is so consistently capable, but the inclusion of view spoiler Hatshepsut s mean spiritedness towards her younger daughter and the late Senenmut, and Thutmose III s attempted rape of Hatshepsut, hide spoiler convinced me to settle on a 6 out of 10 rating Not only are they historically inaccurate, but it smacks of lurid character assassination simply to spice up the story, something which seems unnecessary when the real history is so interesting, and over insulting to the real people one is writing about As author Laurel Corona advises historical novelists do not defame the dead.After recently reading all the Hatshepsut novels I could get my hands on, I am left with the conclusion that Pauline Gedge s Child of the Morning, which I first read years ago, is still the best Hatshepsut of them all.6 out of 10

  2. Lisa Lisa says:

    Made up of twenty nine scrolls styled as the memoirs of Hatshepsut, Mari Heese s The Double Crown is an attempt to illuminate the life of Egypt s most famous female pharaoh Thinking that if Heese pulled it off, I would have a tremendous read on my hands, I spent about a year searching for a copy before the Kindle version was released this year Having read it, I feel disappointed Some people might feel that Heese pulled it off I don t I m not able to immerse myself in her Hatshepsut and Made up of twenty nine scrolls styled as the memoirs of Hatshepsut, Mari Heese s The Double Crown is an attempt to illuminate the life of Egypt s most famous female pharaoh Thinking that if Heese pulled it off, I would have a tremendous read on my hands, I spent about a year searching for a copy before the Kindle version was released this year Having read it, I feel disappointed Some people might feel that Heese pulled it off I don t I m not able to immerse myself in her Hatshepsut and her image of Ancient Egypt I don t believe in the characters and situations Heese creates It needed a leap of faith I just couldn t make.There s some good, though the prose is gorgeous The prologue just made me feel like I was entering into Ancient Egypt, a land of so much life I have sailed the Nile at sunset, floating on a sheet of living gold I have tasted the roasted liver of fat geese I have heard the haunting songs of the blind bard I have felt a child s soft arms, a dying woman s bony grip, a lover s warm caress I have inhaled the incense of the gods.Quickly, though, there s a few disappointments It became pretty clear that Heese s version of Thutmose III was one I was going to be at odds with I find it boring when Hatshepsut and Thutmose III are depicted as rival, slotted in the roles of hero and villain The current theories about their relationship suggest a complexity and depth that most Hatshepsut centric fiction seems to ignore, presenting a clear cut relationship that can be summed up, as Heese does, as she never liked him, nor does he like her.Okay, it might make aexciting plot and bring up possibilities of courtly intrigue and stuff, but I just find it repetitive, unoriginal and boring It means I m reading about the same relationship for the hundredth time and it s not even backed up by Egyptology any And I m fed up that it usually means areductive characterisation of Thutmose III that pays no attention to his noted depth for the love of god or Amun Re , Thutmose III was never just a brutish, war mongering soldier This sounds harsh, and I should point out that Heese s characterisation isn t a particularly bad case of villain Thutmose III, but it s just frustrating to see it come up for the hundredth time without adding anything new to the conversation It s just sad that the most intricate depiction of the Hatshepsut Thutmose relationship remains Pauline Gedge sChild of the Morningfrom over thirty years ago, when Egyptologists were happily telling us how much Hatshepsut and Thutmose hated each other.I had a few issues with the chronology of the book too During the earlier chapters scrolls it seemed as though Hatshepsut was darting between the distant past, the not so distant past and the present It s not a huge sin, mainly because I can imagine that writing your memoirs would encourage an introspection that connects the strands of the past to the future But I also struggled to work out the age differences between characters, or even just Hatshepsut s age most of the time At one stage, Hatshepsut does talk about being 28 when Thutmose III was 20, except I kept seeing him as a child in comparison to her probably because most of the theories on Hatshepsut suggest it The beautiful prose can t make up for a dearth of characterisation I mentioned above that Heese s characterisation of Thutmose isn t particularly bad, but it s mainly because everyone, even Hatshepsut, is held at a distance to the reader Everyone is a little vague, and while it could be a narrative choice to depict a Hatshepsut who would never reveal herself or anyone else, even in her secret writings, it doesn t work for me because we need to see Hatshepsut, at least, in all her intensity, for the novel to succeed I didn t know anyone enough to bring myself to care about them.Parts of Hatshepsut s character I just did not care for She dislikes her youngest daughter , Meryetre Hatshepsut, from birth, to the point where Neferure, a child herself, cares for her sister better than their mother later, too, Hatshepsut gloats about being thin while Meryetre is fat Ugh Then there s the love affair with Senenmut, which I actually liked because it wasn t all rainbows and perfect love, actually emphasising the struggle Hatshepsut faces between the knowledge that taking a lover may weaken her position, and her desire for affection and love view spoiler And then, it s revealed that Senenmut has a wife who has given birth to twin sons and Hatshepsut decides to have condemn the dead Senenmut into oblivion, to the point of hiring someone to destroy his body Wow hide spoiler Hatshepsut s writings are supplemented by commentary by Mahu, the scribe Hatshepsut entrusts with these scrolls A lot of his commentary felt unnecessary he either repeats his version of something Hatshepsut had already described, adding very little, or repeats some iteration of not good, not good, oh I wish I never dared to read these, but I can t stop now but I did think Mahu s insight worked well as an epilogue to Hatshepsut s memoirs To be honest, I found the most interesting part of the book is when Hatshepsut started doubting her right to rule and decision to keep Thutmose III from power But the book swiftly ends at that point, when it really could have started there.I was also pretty put out by the decision to depict Thutmose III view spoiler as attempting to rape Hatshepsut Rape is a serious issue and should not be used purely to show that Thutmose III is awful and Hatshepsut is awesome because she knocks him, the great warrior, out Which is pretty much all Heese uses the attempted rape scene for hide spoiler In all fairness, a lot of my issues with The Double Crown comes down to my familiarity with Hatshepsut narratives, both fiction and non fiction It s a fantastic idea that Heese had and she has enough skill to make me believe at the start that I am entering Ancient Egypt but it s a pity that her skill didn t extend to creating a Hatshepsut that felt real and alive and ultimately human

  3. Loraine Loraine says:

    Interesting But translation should have been done by a professional

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