Falling Man PDF/EPUB Þ Unknown Binding

Falling Man PDF/EPUB Þ Unknown Binding


  • Unknown Binding
  • Falling Man
  • Don DeLillo
  • English
  • 18 August 2018
  • 0330453173

10 thoughts on “Falling Man

  1. Peter Peter says:

    Don DeLillo s novel Falling Man hasunspecified pronouns than I care to read It s written in that postmodern style that calls for rapidly changing vignettes the reader bounces from one scene to another to another in just four pages, and as if to drive us mad, DeLillo hardly ever tells us who is speaking or acting The sections begin with sentences like He missed the kid or She missed those nights with friends when you talk about everything We re left in the dark, and the characters, Don DeLillo s novel Falling Man hasunspecified pronouns than I care to read It s written in that postmodern style that calls for rapidly changing vignettes the reader bounces from one scene to another to another in just four pages, and as if to drive us mad, DeLillo hardly ever tells us who is speaking or acting The sections begin with sentences like He missed the kid or She missed those nights with friends when you talk about everything We re left in the dark, and the characters, as a result, feel far, far away.Maybe this is the point Maybe This is, after all, a novel about a dysfunctional family father, mother, son and the impact of 9 11 on their lives The novel begins in the cloudy streets after the attack, and it jumps around through the preceding events and the aftermath until it finally returns to the husband s experience inside the towers when the planes hit The characters are already estranged from each other before they suffer this trauma, and the events that follow only further estrange them.And so, it seems, nobody really knows anybody, and hardly anyone really wants to talk to anyone else about anything, and DeLillo, it seems, wants us to feel this emptiness and helplessness Conversations between characters are abstract and oblique They repeat lines often, as if in a trance Their sentences fall short They all fade away from each other Sometimes they even talk about fading away from each other Maybe this is an accurate portrayal of the shock and confusion of what happened, but it doesn t make good reading The question it raises, though, is what DeLillo s intention is Reading this was maddening there s very little to grab onto If his goal is for us to experience the same aimless wandering as the people who walked away from the rubble, then he has succeeded We re confused, we don t know where we re going, but we keep turning the pages.Unfortunately, doing so is a burden I wanted again and again to abandon this book, but forced myself through it The ending, however, did offer some reward In the final pages DeLillo recreates what it was like to be in the towers when the planes struck It offered something solid and new, and it helped explain the frustrating mood of the rest of the novel Could DeLillo have started with the crash It might have explained the tone better in my mind, but he d have been left without a clear ending As it is, the attack does serve as a kind of climax.Even so, I realize that some of my distaste also came from being unwilling to let myself into the novel Already, I was skeptical of the sensationalism of the event 9 11 still reeks of press and politics, and making a film or writing a book about it seems like a path to an easy buck, even if it is Don DeLillo.As a treatment of 9 11, I appreciated Foer s Extremely Loud and Incredibly CloseIt gives us the distance from the attacks that time has allowed most readers It takes us away from the immediacy of being in the towers and in the rubble, which most of us will never quite be able to relate to, and explores how that experience has become a part of our lives rather than the entirety of our lives Do I recommend itNo Maybe for someone who wants to know what it feels like to be lost Would I teach itNo Lasting ImpressionReading this is like walking through fog There are shapes that look like people moving around you, but you never really know who they are


  2. Lisa Lisa says:

    I read Falling Man just after it appeared, and liked it well enough, thinking it pictured a moment in time, here today and gone tomorrow But time has gone on and on since this reflection on overfed, over anxious, over zealous humanity facing the concept of 9 11 and its aftermath was published And we are still falling, and falling and falling Our children are waiting for disaster on the news as a kind of entertainment in the way the little boy watched for planes in the sky in Falling Man We a I read Falling Man just after it appeared, and liked it well enough, thinking it pictured a moment in time, here today and gone tomorrow But time has gone on and on since this reflection on overfed, over anxious, over zealous humanity facing the concept of 9 11 and its aftermath was published And we are still falling, and falling and falling Our children are waiting for disaster on the news as a kind of entertainment in the way the little boy watched for planes in the sky in Falling Man We are falling, falling, waiting to crash, and we are not free free falling as the song goes, but bound for solid earth with our fragile bodies.We are stuck, stuck falling.This novel could be read as a perpetuum immobile on the human condition in the modern world


  3. Lori Lori says:

    Never before have I returned days later to delete an entire review and rewrite it, even added a star, but that s the case with The Falling Man And it s because I m still absorbing it and wrestling with it even though I finished days ago I ve never read DeLillo before and have had an unusual experience with this book in that I find the subtextinteresting than the text.While reading I was questioning some of the decisions DeLillo made, especially one that I thought was a fail, the inclus Never before have I returned days later to delete an entire review and rewrite it, even added a star, but that s the case with The Falling Man And it s because I m still absorbing it and wrestling with it even though I finished days ago I ve never read DeLillo before and have had an unusual experience with this book in that I find the subtextinteresting than the text.While reading I was questioning some of the decisions DeLillo made, especially one that I thought was a fail, the inclusion of Hammad, but days later I realize it was actually a perfect choice, forcing upon us that he is as human as anyone else Main character Keith s poker game is a brilliant device to track Keith s life before and after he survives the towers Some of the members of the weekly poker game don t survive, another is badly injured Keith s new relationship with poker provides both an escape from reality and an honest forging of a new reality in whose confines he can feel safe again One could never capture 9 11 in a novel and if you re looking for that, there are documentaries and nonfiction books that come close As a novel, The Falling Man is breathtaking, difficult, full of symbolism, a book to be haunted by It s no easy read I love that days after closing this book I m still engaging with it and challenged by it


  4. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Struggled to truly get into this, and had it not been for my strict rule of finishing a book once I ve got pass the halfway point I would have likely abandoned it Falling man will be the last 21st century DeLillo novel I will read, and it also made me realise that Cosmopolis wasn t so bad afterall.His 14th novel is an exploration of America s recent history, namely 9 11 DeLillo deploys a set of intersecting narratives which begins on September 11, 2001, just as the Twin Towers are falling.It s Struggled to truly get into this, and had it not been for my strict rule of finishing a book once I ve got pass the halfway point I would have likely abandoned it Falling man will be the last 21st century DeLillo novel I will read, and it also made me realise that Cosmopolis wasn t so bad afterall.His 14th novel is an exploration of America s recent history, namely 9 11 DeLillo deploys a set of intersecting narratives which begins on September 11, 2001, just as the Twin Towers are falling.It starts with New York City office worker Keith Neudecker who survives the attack, returning to his ex wife Lianne, and their young son Justin, instead of his own apartment, and in short, almost cryptic fragments that move around in time, we learn of the couple s past difficulties and nominal reconciliation, in relation to Lianne s troubled closeness to her elegant mother Nina, memories of her father, volunteer work with a Alzheimer s patients support group, and the poker playing cronies with whom Keith has led a separate life with DeLillo connects these and numerous other segments, including the figures of an Iraqi true believer preparing himself for martyrdom, a jaded European who predicts America s impending downfall, and an eponymous performance artist whose daring suicidal plunges increasingly foreshadows and embodies the experience of free fall which the other characters are leaning towards Falling Man is compassionately written, and constructed with a harrowing momentum that did occasionally keep my nerves on edge, but it s disconnected style and characters that really didn t do anything for me, left me feeling empty after closing pages Falling Man for some could be seen as one of Delillo s better efforts in the last twenty years, but unfortunately for me it was just a chore to read


  5. Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen) Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen) says:

    1 Star Falling Man is an epic failure largely because Don Delillo tries to tell a story that is simply not his story to tell. Often lauded as the first 9 11 novel this story starts with our MC, Keith, literally on the streets of Manhattan after the second tower falls already a risky and weighted choice for a narrator But then halfway through, Keith s story is paralleled with Hammad s, a man revealed to be one of the hijackers And I get it okay I get the whole parallel between Keith s apath 1 Star Falling Man is an epic failure largely because Don Delillo tries to tell a story that is simply not his story to tell. Often lauded as the first 9 11 novel this story starts with our MC, Keith, literally on the streets of Manhattan after the second tower falls already a risky and weighted choice for a narrator But then halfway through, Keith s story is paralleled with Hammad s, a man revealed to be one of the hijackers And I get it okay I get the whole parallel between Keith s apathetic existence and loveless marriage and Hammad s intensely driven and dedicated existence I get what Delillo is trying to do, but it falls dangerously flat and over simplifies complicated people and a complicated tragedy None of the characters have very much substance, but portraying a terrorist as a singularly focused almost cartoon villain type felt especially lazy Part of this oversimplification is the fault of the needlessly vague post modern style The whole avoiding pronouns and descriptions has never been a tactic I ve enjoyed And the dialogue here was SO ridiculously on the nose and stilted ExampleYou thought Keith would get you there What did I want To feel dangerously alive This was a quality you associated with your father But that wasn t the case Does any part of that feel like a conversation between a mother and daughter Particularly a conversation that just starts out of the blue about the daughters failing marriage The narrative seems so focused on critiquing hollow American family life, that the characters never feel like anything real which makes the critique lose all credibility.I usually try to avoid speculating authorial intent because let s be real it s pretty much irrelevant but all of this feels really rushed and bland And I can t help but wonder if Delillo was in such a rush to get buzz for being the first 9 11 novel that no one stopped to consider if this was a story worth telling and if it did justice to the people involved


  6. Rebecca McNutt Rebecca McNutt says:

    The story of a dysfunctional family brought together by death and loss, Falling Man is emotional and gripping, and ultimately very inspirational.


  7. K.D. Absolutely K.D. Absolutely says:

    You pick up a book You read the blurbs Those in front, at the back and perhaps those in the first few pages Then you form an impression Maybe this book is good Maybe this is about this and about that Then you pay for the book and start reading at home.We all know about The Falling Man On September 11, 2001, a man was photograph falling, or some people say flying, from the north tower He appeared to have, in his last instants of life, embraced his fate He departed from this earth like an You pick up a book You read the blurbs Those in front, at the back and perhaps those in the first few pages Then you form an impression Maybe this book is good Maybe this is about this and about that Then you pay for the book and start reading at home.We all know about The Falling Man On September 11, 2001, a man was photograph falling, or some people say flying, from the north tower He appeared to have, in his last instants of life, embraced his fate He departed from this earth like an downward arrow Five years after the attack, he was identified as Jonathan Briley, a a 43 year old employee of the Windows on the World restaurant This 2007 novel, Falling Man by the master storyteller Don DeLillo, is not about him.That may disappoint some people I, too, was disappointed I was already on the page 30 of this 246 page book waiting for that character to show up The main male protagonist, Keith who works in the poker house in one of the towers, is seen in the opening scene walking bleeding and scared and confused aimlessly around the North Tower before it collapsed So, where is the falling man There is a falling man in the story but he was used by Mr DeLillo as a symbol and not an active character That falling man works in a circus or doing bungee jumps along the streets of New York.I also thought that Mr DeLillo would dwell on another dysfunctional American family Keith, Lianne and Justin as described in the blurbs That was another disappointment This is no Home by Marilynne Robinson, nor Cost by Roxana Robinson, nor any other Robinsons, not even funny like the movie Meet the Robinsons And that is where the magic of DeLillo s writing is anchored upon being unpredictable He brings you to a place you are not expecting to go or to accept a reasoning that you are not expecting or not ready to believe He seems to know what you are thinking as a reader and he hates to be double guessed.As usual, writing is flawless The characters, at times, felt like caricatures but I guess that it is the intention Mr DeLillo does not what the readers to focus on the family members The story is about somethings bigger and looming above all of us global terrorism, racial and religious beliefs and even the purpose of one s life I learned something new though gruesome organic shrapnels human flesh that got driven into the skin of the survivor it only shows up months later after the bombing.HEAVEN FORBID THAT YOU DIE WITHOUT READING THIS


  8. Bart Bart says:

    Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Falling Man, a sparse work that is better than The Body Artist and much much better than Cosmopolis, does about as much as it can hope to do Don DeLillo s powers simply aren t up to the task of making a new statement about a national tragedy like 9 11 He is an assembler of words and sentences and paragraphs and at times chapters, but he is not a thinker What, then, has made him considered such an important voice in American letters Being clever, th Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Falling Man, a sparse work that is better than The Body Artist and much much better than Cosmopolis, does about as much as it can hope to do Don DeLillo s powers simply aren t up to the task of making a new statement about a national tragedy like 9 11 He is an assembler of words and sentences and paragraphs and at times chapters, but he is not a thinker What, then, has made him considered such an important voice in American letters Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Americana and White Noise, muchthan the oddly over praised Libra and Underworld, are when DeLillo is at his very best When he is able to write interesting sentences about unimportant things, when he is able to lend unserious topics the full focus of his rich prose, in other words, DeLillo is doing what he was called to do.But when he tries to use character less personages to show us how important 9 11 was to New York s literary set, frankly, he s way beyond his talent s reach Fundamentally, DeLillo is unable to lend gravity to a grave happening because such gravity would require characters that, in some way, resemble human beings.DeLillo doesn t seem to know any persons in real life, and so he assembles collections of phrases and limbs and quirky qualities like a character who speaks only in monosyllabic words and then subjects them to detailed scenery DeLillo s characters belong to science fictionthan literary fiction and in this way DeLillo seems to have become a lightweight Thomas Pynchon which is fine Pynchon can t be taken inthan small doses.Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it.In the last 10 pages of this 246 page book, there s a sentence that goes like this She was arguing with herself but it wasn t argument, just the noise the brain makes.This sentencethan any other may act as metaphor for DeLillo s recent works Standing alone in its own paragraph, this sentence seems to say something important But once a reader stops and looks at it from 360 degrees what any artist should want , the reader realizes there s nothing there at all.Better put, DeLillo is telling us a story but it isn t a story, just the noise a writer makes.When this unseriousness is married to DeLillo s usual tricks of repeating one clever phrase in stand alone paragraphs throughout a chapter, what is left is a meaningless work by an artist whose fundamental lack of gravity has finally outrun his ample talent.Being annoying, that s how DeLillo did it


  9. Ben Ben says:

    The thing with DeLillo is the what The conversations The sentence fragments The writing style.Of any list of candidates to write about the horrors of 9 11, DeLillo must have shown up Underworld of course has the famous photo of the towers by Andre Kertesz Falling Man has another photo on its cover by Katie Day Weisberger It is taken from the sky, where one sees a cyclopean vista of clouds but for the two towers peeking out, dwarfed It s as breathtaking and emotive as the first, but with The thing with DeLillo is the what The conversations The sentence fragments The writing style.Of any list of candidates to write about the horrors of 9 11, DeLillo must have shown up Underworld of course has the famous photo of the towers by Andre Kertesz Falling Man has another photo on its cover by Katie Day Weisberger It is taken from the sky, where one sees a cyclopean vista of clouds but for the two towers peeking out, dwarfed It s as breathtaking and emotive as the first, but with our renewed perspective in the post 9 11 world His novel The Names focuses on a blind search for terrorists, or a group of politically motivated abductors in Mao II Likewise, Libra places the reader into Lee Harvey Oswald s mindset Adding in his New York experiences places DeLillo into the cast of authors who come to this subject matter with some creative authority Falling Man seems at first to follow some regular DeLillo fare a couple Lianne and Keith who had gone through a separation, and the clipped visuals of freeze frame action But as the novel bears down on the reader, they show greater depth and deeper pain It s not about the day after It follows them for what feels like the rest of their lives with 9 11 wrapped around their torsos It captures the chronic trauma of it, and it leaves behind an emotional rift for an engaged reader We ve all got jobs that we d have to get back to even after a tragic event pacing around carpeted cubicles or sitting behind desks and carrels For me, through the din I could hear the rattling in his characters souls DeLillo doesn t break his own conventions or introduce brand new style switches in the literature, but he ll jerk your stride and remind you of what some of us must live with


  10. Kevin Shepherd Kevin Shepherd says:

    Aftermath DeLillo s Falling Man isn t about 9 11, it s about the aftermath It s not about initial trauma, but rather the subsequent unsettlement, an accounting of disheveled people living disheveled lives I m unsure how to rate this book On one hand, the author authentically conveys the shock and psychological disassociation that accompanies catastrophe But on the other hand, it sometimes feels contrived, something that borders on exploitation Is DeLillo opportunistic I don t think so, at Aftermath DeLillo s Falling Man isn t about 9 11, it s about the aftermath It s not about initial trauma, but rather the subsequent unsettlement, an accounting of disheveled people living disheveled lives I m unsure how to rate this book On one hand, the author authentically conveys the shock and psychological disassociation that accompanies catastrophe But on the other hand, it sometimes feels contrived, something that borders on exploitation Is DeLillo opportunistic I don t think so, at least not intentionally, but the prospect left me feeling a little uneasy and disconcerted


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Falling Man❰PDF❯ ✩ Falling Man Author Don DeLillo – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Begins in the smoke and ash of the burning towers and follows the aftermath in the intimate lives of a few individuals This novel traces the way the events of September reconfigured our emotional lan Begins in the smoke and ash of the burning towers and follows the aftermath in the intimate lives of a few individuals This novel traces the way the events of Septemberreconfigured our emotional landscape, our memory, and our perception of the world.


About the Author: Don DeLillo

Don DeLillo is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late th and early st centuries He currently lives outside of New York CityAmong the most influential American writers of the past decades, DeLillo has received, among author awards, a National Book Award White Noise, , a PEN Faulkner Award Mao II, , and an American Book Award Underworld, DeLillo s sixteenth novel, Point Omega, was published in February, .


10 thoughts on “Falling Man

  1. Peter Peter says:

    Don DeLillo s novel Falling Man hasunspecified pronouns than I care to read It s written in that postmodern style that calls for rapidly changing vignettes the reader bounces from one scene to another to another in just four pages, and as if to drive us mad, DeLillo hardly ever tells us who is speaking or acting The sections begin with sentences like He missed the kid or She missed those nights with friends when you talk about everything We re left in the dark, and the characters, Don DeLillo s novel Falling Man hasunspecified pronouns than I care to read It s written in that postmodern style that calls for rapidly changing vignettes the reader bounces from one scene to another to another in just four pages, and as if to drive us mad, DeLillo hardly ever tells us who is speaking or acting The sections begin with sentences like He missed the kid or She missed those nights with friends when you talk about everything We re left in the dark, and the characters, as a result, feel far, far away.Maybe this is the point Maybe This is, after all, a novel about a dysfunctional family father, mother, son and the impact of 9 11 on their lives The novel begins in the cloudy streets after the attack, and it jumps around through the preceding events and the aftermath until it finally returns to the husband s experience inside the towers when the planes hit The characters are already estranged from each other before they suffer this trauma, and the events that follow only further estrange them.And so, it seems, nobody really knows anybody, and hardly anyone really wants to talk to anyone else about anything, and DeLillo, it seems, wants us to feel this emptiness and helplessness Conversations between characters are abstract and oblique They repeat lines often, as if in a trance Their sentences fall short They all fade away from each other Sometimes they even talk about fading away from each other Maybe this is an accurate portrayal of the shock and confusion of what happened, but it doesn t make good reading The question it raises, though, is what DeLillo s intention is Reading this was maddening there s very little to grab onto If his goal is for us to experience the same aimless wandering as the people who walked away from the rubble, then he has succeeded We re confused, we don t know where we re going, but we keep turning the pages.Unfortunately, doing so is a burden I wanted again and again to abandon this book, but forced myself through it The ending, however, did offer some reward In the final pages DeLillo recreates what it was like to be in the towers when the planes struck It offered something solid and new, and it helped explain the frustrating mood of the rest of the novel Could DeLillo have started with the crash It might have explained the tone better in my mind, but he d have been left without a clear ending As it is, the attack does serve as a kind of climax.Even so, I realize that some of my distaste also came from being unwilling to let myself into the novel Already, I was skeptical of the sensationalism of the event 9 11 still reeks of press and politics, and making a film or writing a book about it seems like a path to an easy buck, even if it is Don DeLillo.As a treatment of 9 11, I appreciated Foer s Extremely Loud and Incredibly CloseIt gives us the distance from the attacks that time has allowed most readers It takes us away from the immediacy of being in the towers and in the rubble, which most of us will never quite be able to relate to, and explores how that experience has become a part of our lives rather than the entirety of our lives Do I recommend itNo Maybe for someone who wants to know what it feels like to be lost Would I teach itNo Lasting ImpressionReading this is like walking through fog There are shapes that look like people moving around you, but you never really know who they are

  2. Lisa Lisa says:

    I read Falling Man just after it appeared, and liked it well enough, thinking it pictured a moment in time, here today and gone tomorrow But time has gone on and on since this reflection on overfed, over anxious, over zealous humanity facing the concept of 9 11 and its aftermath was published And we are still falling, and falling and falling Our children are waiting for disaster on the news as a kind of entertainment in the way the little boy watched for planes in the sky in Falling Man We a I read Falling Man just after it appeared, and liked it well enough, thinking it pictured a moment in time, here today and gone tomorrow But time has gone on and on since this reflection on overfed, over anxious, over zealous humanity facing the concept of 9 11 and its aftermath was published And we are still falling, and falling and falling Our children are waiting for disaster on the news as a kind of entertainment in the way the little boy watched for planes in the sky in Falling Man We are falling, falling, waiting to crash, and we are not free free falling as the song goes, but bound for solid earth with our fragile bodies.We are stuck, stuck falling.This novel could be read as a perpetuum immobile on the human condition in the modern world

  3. Lori Lori says:

    Never before have I returned days later to delete an entire review and rewrite it, even added a star, but that s the case with The Falling Man And it s because I m still absorbing it and wrestling with it even though I finished days ago I ve never read DeLillo before and have had an unusual experience with this book in that I find the subtextinteresting than the text.While reading I was questioning some of the decisions DeLillo made, especially one that I thought was a fail, the inclus Never before have I returned days later to delete an entire review and rewrite it, even added a star, but that s the case with The Falling Man And it s because I m still absorbing it and wrestling with it even though I finished days ago I ve never read DeLillo before and have had an unusual experience with this book in that I find the subtextinteresting than the text.While reading I was questioning some of the decisions DeLillo made, especially one that I thought was a fail, the inclusion of Hammad, but days later I realize it was actually a perfect choice, forcing upon us that he is as human as anyone else Main character Keith s poker game is a brilliant device to track Keith s life before and after he survives the towers Some of the members of the weekly poker game don t survive, another is badly injured Keith s new relationship with poker provides both an escape from reality and an honest forging of a new reality in whose confines he can feel safe again One could never capture 9 11 in a novel and if you re looking for that, there are documentaries and nonfiction books that come close As a novel, The Falling Man is breathtaking, difficult, full of symbolism, a book to be haunted by It s no easy read I love that days after closing this book I m still engaging with it and challenged by it

  4. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Struggled to truly get into this, and had it not been for my strict rule of finishing a book once I ve got pass the halfway point I would have likely abandoned it Falling man will be the last 21st century DeLillo novel I will read, and it also made me realise that Cosmopolis wasn t so bad afterall.His 14th novel is an exploration of America s recent history, namely 9 11 DeLillo deploys a set of intersecting narratives which begins on September 11, 2001, just as the Twin Towers are falling.It s Struggled to truly get into this, and had it not been for my strict rule of finishing a book once I ve got pass the halfway point I would have likely abandoned it Falling man will be the last 21st century DeLillo novel I will read, and it also made me realise that Cosmopolis wasn t so bad afterall.His 14th novel is an exploration of America s recent history, namely 9 11 DeLillo deploys a set of intersecting narratives which begins on September 11, 2001, just as the Twin Towers are falling.It starts with New York City office worker Keith Neudecker who survives the attack, returning to his ex wife Lianne, and their young son Justin, instead of his own apartment, and in short, almost cryptic fragments that move around in time, we learn of the couple s past difficulties and nominal reconciliation, in relation to Lianne s troubled closeness to her elegant mother Nina, memories of her father, volunteer work with a Alzheimer s patients support group, and the poker playing cronies with whom Keith has led a separate life with DeLillo connects these and numerous other segments, including the figures of an Iraqi true believer preparing himself for martyrdom, a jaded European who predicts America s impending downfall, and an eponymous performance artist whose daring suicidal plunges increasingly foreshadows and embodies the experience of free fall which the other characters are leaning towards Falling Man is compassionately written, and constructed with a harrowing momentum that did occasionally keep my nerves on edge, but it s disconnected style and characters that really didn t do anything for me, left me feeling empty after closing pages Falling Man for some could be seen as one of Delillo s better efforts in the last twenty years, but unfortunately for me it was just a chore to read

  5. Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen) Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen) says:

    1 Star Falling Man is an epic failure largely because Don Delillo tries to tell a story that is simply not his story to tell. Often lauded as the first 9 11 novel this story starts with our MC, Keith, literally on the streets of Manhattan after the second tower falls already a risky and weighted choice for a narrator But then halfway through, Keith s story is paralleled with Hammad s, a man revealed to be one of the hijackers And I get it okay I get the whole parallel between Keith s apath 1 Star Falling Man is an epic failure largely because Don Delillo tries to tell a story that is simply not his story to tell. Often lauded as the first 9 11 novel this story starts with our MC, Keith, literally on the streets of Manhattan after the second tower falls already a risky and weighted choice for a narrator But then halfway through, Keith s story is paralleled with Hammad s, a man revealed to be one of the hijackers And I get it okay I get the whole parallel between Keith s apathetic existence and loveless marriage and Hammad s intensely driven and dedicated existence I get what Delillo is trying to do, but it falls dangerously flat and over simplifies complicated people and a complicated tragedy None of the characters have very much substance, but portraying a terrorist as a singularly focused almost cartoon villain type felt especially lazy Part of this oversimplification is the fault of the needlessly vague post modern style The whole avoiding pronouns and descriptions has never been a tactic I ve enjoyed And the dialogue here was SO ridiculously on the nose and stilted ExampleYou thought Keith would get you there What did I want To feel dangerously alive This was a quality you associated with your father But that wasn t the case Does any part of that feel like a conversation between a mother and daughter Particularly a conversation that just starts out of the blue about the daughters failing marriage The narrative seems so focused on critiquing hollow American family life, that the characters never feel like anything real which makes the critique lose all credibility.I usually try to avoid speculating authorial intent because let s be real it s pretty much irrelevant but all of this feels really rushed and bland And I can t help but wonder if Delillo was in such a rush to get buzz for being the first 9 11 novel that no one stopped to consider if this was a story worth telling and if it did justice to the people involved

  6. Rebecca McNutt Rebecca McNutt says:

    The story of a dysfunctional family brought together by death and loss, Falling Man is emotional and gripping, and ultimately very inspirational.

  7. K.D. Absolutely K.D. Absolutely says:

    You pick up a book You read the blurbs Those in front, at the back and perhaps those in the first few pages Then you form an impression Maybe this book is good Maybe this is about this and about that Then you pay for the book and start reading at home.We all know about The Falling Man On September 11, 2001, a man was photograph falling, or some people say flying, from the north tower He appeared to have, in his last instants of life, embraced his fate He departed from this earth like an You pick up a book You read the blurbs Those in front, at the back and perhaps those in the first few pages Then you form an impression Maybe this book is good Maybe this is about this and about that Then you pay for the book and start reading at home.We all know about The Falling Man On September 11, 2001, a man was photograph falling, or some people say flying, from the north tower He appeared to have, in his last instants of life, embraced his fate He departed from this earth like an downward arrow Five years after the attack, he was identified as Jonathan Briley, a a 43 year old employee of the Windows on the World restaurant This 2007 novel, Falling Man by the master storyteller Don DeLillo, is not about him.That may disappoint some people I, too, was disappointed I was already on the page 30 of this 246 page book waiting for that character to show up The main male protagonist, Keith who works in the poker house in one of the towers, is seen in the opening scene walking bleeding and scared and confused aimlessly around the North Tower before it collapsed So, where is the falling man There is a falling man in the story but he was used by Mr DeLillo as a symbol and not an active character That falling man works in a circus or doing bungee jumps along the streets of New York.I also thought that Mr DeLillo would dwell on another dysfunctional American family Keith, Lianne and Justin as described in the blurbs That was another disappointment This is no Home by Marilynne Robinson, nor Cost by Roxana Robinson, nor any other Robinsons, not even funny like the movie Meet the Robinsons And that is where the magic of DeLillo s writing is anchored upon being unpredictable He brings you to a place you are not expecting to go or to accept a reasoning that you are not expecting or not ready to believe He seems to know what you are thinking as a reader and he hates to be double guessed.As usual, writing is flawless The characters, at times, felt like caricatures but I guess that it is the intention Mr DeLillo does not what the readers to focus on the family members The story is about somethings bigger and looming above all of us global terrorism, racial and religious beliefs and even the purpose of one s life I learned something new though gruesome organic shrapnels human flesh that got driven into the skin of the survivor it only shows up months later after the bombing.HEAVEN FORBID THAT YOU DIE WITHOUT READING THIS

  8. Bart Bart says:

    Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Falling Man, a sparse work that is better than The Body Artist and much much better than Cosmopolis, does about as much as it can hope to do Don DeLillo s powers simply aren t up to the task of making a new statement about a national tragedy like 9 11 He is an assembler of words and sentences and paragraphs and at times chapters, but he is not a thinker What, then, has made him considered such an important voice in American letters Being clever, th Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Falling Man, a sparse work that is better than The Body Artist and much much better than Cosmopolis, does about as much as it can hope to do Don DeLillo s powers simply aren t up to the task of making a new statement about a national tragedy like 9 11 He is an assembler of words and sentences and paragraphs and at times chapters, but he is not a thinker What, then, has made him considered such an important voice in American letters Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it Americana and White Noise, muchthan the oddly over praised Libra and Underworld, are when DeLillo is at his very best When he is able to write interesting sentences about unimportant things, when he is able to lend unserious topics the full focus of his rich prose, in other words, DeLillo is doing what he was called to do.But when he tries to use character less personages to show us how important 9 11 was to New York s literary set, frankly, he s way beyond his talent s reach Fundamentally, DeLillo is unable to lend gravity to a grave happening because such gravity would require characters that, in some way, resemble human beings.DeLillo doesn t seem to know any persons in real life, and so he assembles collections of phrases and limbs and quirky qualities like a character who speaks only in monosyllabic words and then subjects them to detailed scenery DeLillo s characters belong to science fictionthan literary fiction and in this way DeLillo seems to have become a lightweight Thomas Pynchon which is fine Pynchon can t be taken inthan small doses.Being clever, that s how DeLillo does it.In the last 10 pages of this 246 page book, there s a sentence that goes like this She was arguing with herself but it wasn t argument, just the noise the brain makes.This sentencethan any other may act as metaphor for DeLillo s recent works Standing alone in its own paragraph, this sentence seems to say something important But once a reader stops and looks at it from 360 degrees what any artist should want , the reader realizes there s nothing there at all.Better put, DeLillo is telling us a story but it isn t a story, just the noise a writer makes.When this unseriousness is married to DeLillo s usual tricks of repeating one clever phrase in stand alone paragraphs throughout a chapter, what is left is a meaningless work by an artist whose fundamental lack of gravity has finally outrun his ample talent.Being annoying, that s how DeLillo did it

  9. Ben Ben says:

    The thing with DeLillo is the what The conversations The sentence fragments The writing style.Of any list of candidates to write about the horrors of 9 11, DeLillo must have shown up Underworld of course has the famous photo of the towers by Andre Kertesz Falling Man has another photo on its cover by Katie Day Weisberger It is taken from the sky, where one sees a cyclopean vista of clouds but for the two towers peeking out, dwarfed It s as breathtaking and emotive as the first, but with The thing with DeLillo is the what The conversations The sentence fragments The writing style.Of any list of candidates to write about the horrors of 9 11, DeLillo must have shown up Underworld of course has the famous photo of the towers by Andre Kertesz Falling Man has another photo on its cover by Katie Day Weisberger It is taken from the sky, where one sees a cyclopean vista of clouds but for the two towers peeking out, dwarfed It s as breathtaking and emotive as the first, but with our renewed perspective in the post 9 11 world His novel The Names focuses on a blind search for terrorists, or a group of politically motivated abductors in Mao II Likewise, Libra places the reader into Lee Harvey Oswald s mindset Adding in his New York experiences places DeLillo into the cast of authors who come to this subject matter with some creative authority Falling Man seems at first to follow some regular DeLillo fare a couple Lianne and Keith who had gone through a separation, and the clipped visuals of freeze frame action But as the novel bears down on the reader, they show greater depth and deeper pain It s not about the day after It follows them for what feels like the rest of their lives with 9 11 wrapped around their torsos It captures the chronic trauma of it, and it leaves behind an emotional rift for an engaged reader We ve all got jobs that we d have to get back to even after a tragic event pacing around carpeted cubicles or sitting behind desks and carrels For me, through the din I could hear the rattling in his characters souls DeLillo doesn t break his own conventions or introduce brand new style switches in the literature, but he ll jerk your stride and remind you of what some of us must live with

  10. Kevin Shepherd Kevin Shepherd says:

    Aftermath DeLillo s Falling Man isn t about 9 11, it s about the aftermath It s not about initial trauma, but rather the subsequent unsettlement, an accounting of disheveled people living disheveled lives I m unsure how to rate this book On one hand, the author authentically conveys the shock and psychological disassociation that accompanies catastrophe But on the other hand, it sometimes feels contrived, something that borders on exploitation Is DeLillo opportunistic I don t think so, at Aftermath DeLillo s Falling Man isn t about 9 11, it s about the aftermath It s not about initial trauma, but rather the subsequent unsettlement, an accounting of disheveled people living disheveled lives I m unsure how to rate this book On one hand, the author authentically conveys the shock and psychological disassociation that accompanies catastrophe But on the other hand, it sometimes feels contrived, something that borders on exploitation Is DeLillo opportunistic I don t think so, at least not intentionally, but the prospect left me feeling a little uneasy and disconcerted

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